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((string)dt.Rows[i][1]).Replace("'", "\\'")

I want the result that if any string have quote it change it into slash quote, e.g. John's -> John\'s

but the above replace function is not working fine. it results like John\\'s

but if we change the code to

((string)dt.Rows[i][1]).Replace("'", "\'")

it gives the Result like John's

does change it anyway.

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3  
Sounds like as if you want to sanitize a SQL string. If this is true, then please realize that there are much better ways than manually replacing the quotes. Prepared statements for example. –  BalusC Jun 7 '10 at 14:03
1  
@John Rash - I'm not sure your edit helped here, as far as I can tell you have corrected Azhar's code by changing "\'" to "\\'", so your edit kind of answered the question:-) –  Steve Haigh Jun 10 '10 at 21:16
1  
@Steve - I did not add anything I only modified the formatting, look at the original source –  John Rasch Jun 10 '10 at 21:41
    
@John - weird, you are right, looking at the source you clearly didn't modify this but the visual diff seems to show string.Replace("'", "\'"); changing to string.Replace("'", "\\'"); Apolgies for the confusion. –  Steve Haigh Jun 11 '10 at 11:14

7 Answers 7

up vote 14 down vote accepted

Because the backslash is the escape character, you need to tell it you want to treat it like a literal string. You do this by prepending an @ to the string:

((string)dt.Rows[i][1]).Replace("'", @"\'") 
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1  
The @ approach is faster when there are many things to escape and if you ever copy and paste into a different .NET language you will be happy to need only to change the @ rather than all the \\ –  Kate Gregory Jun 7 '10 at 14:51

Try a double backslash.

\\

Just one backslash is an escape; two is an actual backslash.

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Use "\\'" or @"\'" for the replacement string. The backslash is the escape character in C# string literals. See the explanation of string literals in C#: \' in a string literal results in just a single quote. The reason this escape sequence exists, is because single quotes would require escaping if you were using a char literal ('\'').

The @ indicates that you're using verbatim string syntax, which allows for multi-line strings and eliminates the need to escape characters, apart from double quote, which you would escape with double double quotes (Visual Basic style).

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Can you clarify please? Are you saying that

((string)dt.Rows[i][1]).Replace("'", "\\'") 

does not replace a ' with \' ?

Because I just tried it and it works fine. I.e. this

            string one = "blah'";
            string two = one.Replace("'", "\\'");

            Console.WriteLine(two);

Prints blah\'

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Replace("'", "\'") use double slash

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You could use something like this:

private static string replace(String input)
{
   return Regex.Replace(input, "('|\")", "\\'");
}

static void Main(string[] args)
{
   String value1 = "John Steve's";
   String value2 = "John Steve\"s";

   Console.WriteLine(replace(value1));
   Console.WriteLine(replace(value2));
 }

Results:

John Steve\'s

John Steve\'s

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If you want to prepare an SQL query, I think the best method is to replace a single ' for ''. For instance, if you wanto to search John O'Connor, this would work (at least in SQL Server, Access, Oracle, ...).

select ... from users where username = 'Jonh O''Connor'

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If you want to prepare a SQL query like that, don't. –  Thorarin Jun 7 '10 at 17:27

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