Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Given the following interfaces/classes:

public interface IRequest<TResponse> { }

public interface IHandler<TRequest, TResponse>
    where TRequest : IRequest<TResponse>
{
    TResponse Handle(TRequest request);
}

public class HandlingService
{
    public TResponse Handle<TRequest, TResponse>(TRequest request)
        where TRequest : IRequest<TResponse>
    {
        var handler = container.GetInstance<IHandler<TRequest, TResponse>>();
        return handler.Handle(request);
    }
}

public class CustomerResponse
{
    public Customer Customer { get; set; }
}

public class GetCustomerByIdRequest : IRequest<CustomerResponse>
{
    public int CustomerId { get; set; }
}

Why can't the compiler infer the correct types, if I try and write something like the following:

var service = new HandlingService();
var request = new GetCustomerByIdRequest { CustomerId = 1234 };
var response = service.Handle(request);  // Shouldn't this know that response is going to be CustomerResponse?

I just get the 'type arguments cannot be inferred' message. Is this a limitation with generic type inference in general, or is there a way to make this work?

share|improve this question
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You have the constraint TRequest : IRequest<TResponse>, but that doesn't mean that TResponse can be automatically inferred from TRequest. Consider that classes can implement multiple interfaces and TRequest may implement several IRequest<TResponse> types; you may not be doing this in your own design, but it would be pretty complicated for the compiler to have to trudge through the entire class hierarchy to infer that particular parameter.

Long story short, the Handle method takes two generic type parameters (TRequest and TResponse) and you're only giving it one that it can actually use. Inferrence only happens on the actual type arguments, not the types that they inherit or implement.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Aaronaught, I hadn't considered multiple interface implementations, makes a lot of sense. However that makes me think that this should make it work: IRequest<CustomerResponse> request = new GetCustomerByIdRequest {CustomerId = 1234}; but it doesn't. Surely with the explicit interface declaration there's no ambiguity over TResponse? –  Jon M Jun 7 '10 at 14:36
    
@Jon: I can see why you would think that, but no, that doesn't quite work either. Passing an abstract IRequest<TResponse> only guarantees that the constraint is satisfied for a specific TResponse; it doesn't help to infer what the actual TResponse type is (which must be known before the constraint is evaluated). In fact, I don't believe that the compiler looks at type constraints at all when doing type inference; it tries to infer the types first, then ensures that the inferred types meet the constraints. That's why you can't overload generic methods that differ only by constraints. –  Aaronaught Jun 7 '10 at 14:55
add comment

I think this depends on the usage...

In this case, something (you don't list it above) is calling service.Handle(request);

If the consuming class does not include the generic type in it's own declaration, I think you will run into this problem.

For example... (this won't work)

public class MyClass
{
     var service = new HandlingService();
     var request = new GetCustomerByIdRequest { CustomerId = 1234 };
     var response = service.Handle(request);
}

This should work... (the class needs to know what TResponse is)

public class MyClass<TResponse> where TResponse : YOURTYPE
{
     var service = new HandlingService();
     var request = new GetCustomerByIdRequest { CustomerId = 1234 };
     var response = service.Handle(request);
}
share|improve this answer
    
I can't see how this would work, TResponse in the context of MyClass<TResponse> has no relation to the inferred type parameters of service.Handle, surely? –  Jon M Jun 7 '10 at 15:27
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.