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Question: Is exception handling in Java actually slow?

Conventional wisdom, as well as a lot of Google results, says that exceptional logic shouldn't be used for normal program flow in Java. Two reasons are usually given, 1) its really slow - even an order of magnitude slower than regular code (the reasons given vary), and 2) its messy because people expect only errors to be handled in exceptional code. This question is about #1.

As an example, this page describes Java exception handling as "very slow" and relates the slowness to the creation of the exception message string - "this string is then used in creating the exception object that is thrown. This is not fast." The article Effective Exception Handling in Java says that "the reason for this is due to the object creation aspect of exception handling, which thereby makes throwing exceptions inherently slow". Another reason out there is that the stack trace generation is what slows it down.

My testing (using Java 1.6.0_07, Java HotSpot 10.0, on 32 bit Linux), indicates that exception handling is no slower than regular code. I tried running a method in a loop that executes some code. At the end of the method, I use a boolean to indicate whether to return or throw. This way the actual processing is the same. I tried running the methods in different orders and averaging my test times, thinking it may have been the JVM warming up. In all my tests, the throw was at least as fast as the return, if not faster (up to 3.1% faster). I am completely open to the possibility that my tests were wrong, but I haven't seen anything out there in the way of code sample, test comparisons, or results in the last year or two that show exception handling in Java to actually be slow.

What lead me down this path was an API I needed to use that threw exceptions as part of normal control logic. I wanted to correct them in their usage, but now I may not be able to. Will I instead have to praise them on their forward thinking?

In the paper Efficient Java exception handling in just-in-time compilation, the authors suggest that the presence of exception handlers alone, even if no exceptions are thrown, is enough to prevent the JIT compiler from optimizing the code properly, thus slowing it down. I haven't tested this theory yet.

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1  
I know you were't asking about 2), but you really should recognize that using an exception for program flow is no better than using GOTOs. Some people defend gotos, some people would defend what you are talking about, but if you ask someone who has implemented and maintained either for a period of time, they will tell you that both are poor hard to maintain design practices (and will probably curse the name of the person who thought they were smart enough to make the decision to use them). –  Bill K Dec 18 '09 at 19:39
27  
Bill, claiming that using exceptions for program flow is no better than using GOTOs is no better than claiming that using conditionals and loops for program flow is no better than using GOTOs. It's a red herring. Explain yourself. Exceptions can and are used effectively for program flow in other languages. Idiomatic Python code uses exceptions regularly, for instance. I can and have maintained code that uses exceptions in this way (not Java though), and I don't think there's anything inherently wrong with it. –  mmalone Sep 1 '10 at 18:23
    
@John your second link is broken –  Pacerier Nov 6 '11 at 16:42
3  
Note that some web frameworks use Exceptions as a convenient way to redirect - e.g. Wicket's RestartResponseException. It happens just few times per request, usually not, and I can hardly imagine more convenient way in a Java-oriented component framework. –  Ondra Žižka Jul 21 '13 at 11:37

16 Answers 16

up vote 157 down vote accepted

It depends how exceptions are implemented. The simplest way is using setjmp and longjmp. That means all registers of the CPU are written to the stack (which already takes some time) and possibly some other data needs to be created... all this already happens in the try statement. The throw statement needs to unwind the stack and restore the values of all registers (and possible other values in the VM). So try and throw are equally slow, and that is pretty slow, however if no exception is thrown, exiting the try block takes no time whatsoever in most cases (as everything is put on the stack which cleans up automatically if the method exists).

Sun and others recognized, that this is possibly suboptimal and of course VMs get faster and faster over the time. There is another way to implement exceptions, which makes try itself lightning fast (actually nothing happens for try at all in general - everything that needs to happen is already done when the class is loaded by the VM) and it makes throw not quite as slow. I don't know which JVM uses this new, better technique...

...but are you writing in Java so your code later on only runs on one JVM on one specific system? Since if it may ever run on any other platform or any other JVM version (possibly of any other vendor), who says they also use the fast implementation? The fast one is more complicated than the slow one and not easily possible on all systems. You want to stay portable? Then don't rely on exceptions being fast.

It also makes a big difference what you do within a try block. If you open a try block and never call any method from within this try block, the try block will be ultra fast, as the JIT can then actually treat a throw like a simple goto. It neither needs to save stack-state nor does it need to unwind the stack if an exception is thrown (it only needs to jump to the catch handlers). However, this is not what you usually do. Usually you open a try block and then call a method that might throw an exception, right? And even if you just use the try block within your method, what kind of method will this be, that does not call any other method? Will it just calculate a number? Then what for do you need exceptions? There are much more elegant ways to regulate program flow. For pretty much anything else but simple math, you will have to call an external method and this already destroys the advantage of a local try block.

See the following test code:

public class Test {
    int value;


    public int getValue() {
    	return value;
    }

    public void reset() {
    	value = 0;
    }

    // Calculates without exception
    public void method1(int i) {
    	value = ((value + i) / i) << 1;
    	// Will never be true
    	if ((i & 0xFFFFFFF) == 1000000000) {
    		System.out.println("You'll never see this!");
    	}
    }

    // Could in theory throw one, but never will
    public void method2(int i) throws Exception {
    	value = ((value + i) / i) << 1;
    	// Will never be true
    	if ((i & 0xFFFFFFF) == 1000000000) {
    		throw new Exception();
    	}
    }

    // This one will regularly throw one
    public void method3(int i) throws Exception {
    	value = ((value + i) / i) << 1;
    	// i & 1 is equally fast to calculate as i & 0xFFFFFFF; it is both
    	// an AND operation between two integers. The size of the number plays
    	// no role. AND on 32 BIT always ANDs all 32 bits
    	if ((i & 0x1) == 1) {
    		throw new Exception();
    	}
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
    	int i;
    	long l;
    	Test t = new Test();

    	l = System.currentTimeMillis();
    	t.reset();
    	for (i = 1; i < 100000000; i++) {
    		t.method1(i);
    	}
    	l = System.currentTimeMillis() - l;
    	System.out.println(
    		"method1 took " + l + " ms, result was " + t.getValue()
    	);

    	l = System.currentTimeMillis();
    	t.reset();
    	for (i = 1; i < 100000000; i++) {
    		try {
    			t.method2(i);
    		} catch (Exception e) {
    			System.out.println("You'll never see this!");
    		}
    	}
    	l = System.currentTimeMillis() - l;
    	System.out.println(
    		"method2 took " + l + " ms, result was " + t.getValue()
    	);

    	l = System.currentTimeMillis();
    	t.reset();
    	for (i = 1; i < 100000000; i++) {
    		try {
    			t.method3(i);
    		} catch (Exception e) {
    			// Do nothing here, as we will get here
    		}
    	}
    	l = System.currentTimeMillis() - l;
    	System.out.println(
    		"method3 took " + l + " ms, result was " + t.getValue()
    	);
    }
}

Result:

method1 took 972 ms, result was 2
method2 took 1003 ms, result was 2
method3 took 66716 ms, result was 2

As you can see, already the try block made the whole thing run slower. The catch block killed everything and made it 66 times slower!

As I said, the result will not be that bad if you put try/catch and throw all within the same method (method3), but this is a special JIT optimization I would not rely upon. And even when using this optimization, the throw is still pretty slow. So I don't know what you are trying to do here, but there is definitely a better way of doing it than using try/catch/throw.

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1  
Thanks, I guess I hadn't gone that deep into the stack for my exception tests. This is exactly what I was looking for. –  John Ellinwood Mar 1 '09 at 17:32
    
great question and response, thanks John & Mecki! I inherited a code that does try-catch to any method (including setter/getter that simply return the value of a property) and was checking some more details on performance implications of such. The question and answer gave me full details on it ;). Best, stef. –  Stef Aug 30 '11 at 0:46
    
@Mecki How is that your peformance is affected so high when JDK Hotspot should be caching these exceptions. javaspecialists.eu/archive/Issue187.html Did you disable this option to run your tests? –  Amir Raminfar Sep 20 '11 at 18:19
1  
Great answer but I'd just like to add that as far as I know, System.nanoTime() should be used for measuring performance, not System.currentTimeMillis(). –  Simon André Forsberg May 19 '13 at 13:15
2  
@SimonAndréForsberg nanoTime() requires Java 1.5 and I had only Java 1.4 available on the system I used for writing the code above. Also it doesn't play a huge role in practice. The only difference between the two is that one is nanosecond the other one milliseconds and that nanoTime is not influenced by clock manipulations (which are irrelevant, unless you or system process modifies the system clock exactly the moment the test code is running). Generally you are right, though, nanoTime is of course the better choice. –  Mecki May 22 '13 at 14:46

FYI, I extended the experiment that Mecki did:

method1 took 1733 ms, result was 2
method2 took 1248 ms, result was 2
method3 took 83997 ms, result was 2
method4 took 1692 ms, result was 2
method5 took 60946 ms, result was 2
method6 took 25746 ms, result was 2

The first 3 are the same as Mecki's (my laptop is obviously slower).

method4 is identical to method3 except that it creates a new Integer(1) rather than doing throw new Exception().

method5 is like method3 except that it creates the new Exception() without throwing it.

method6 is like method3 except that it throws a pre-created exception (an instance variable) rather than creating a new one.

In Java much of the expense of throwing an exception is the time spent gathering the stack trace, which occurs when the exception object is created. The actual cost of throwing the exception, while large, is considerably less than the cost of creating the exception.

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9  
+1 Your answer addresses the core issue - the time taken to unwind the and trace the stack, and secondarily the throwing of the error. I would have selected this as the final answer. –  Nick Wiggill Aug 17 '12 at 12:55

My answer unfortunately is just too long to post here. So let me summarize here and refer you to http://blog.fuwjax.org/2011/04/how-slow-are-java-exceptions/ for the gritty details.

The real question here is not "How slow are 'failures reported as exceptions' compared to 'code that never fails'?" as the accepted response might have you believe. Instead the question should be "How slow are 'failures reported as exceptions' compared to failures reported other ways?" Generally the two other ways of reporting failures are either with sentinel values or with result objects.

Sentinel values are an attempt to return one class in the case of success and another in the case of failure. You can think of it almost as returning an exception instead of throwing one. This requires a shared parent class with the success object, and then doing an "instanceof" check and a couple casts to get the success or failure information.

It turns out that at the risk of type safety, Sentinel values are faster than exceptions, but only by a factor of roughly 2x. Now, that may seem like a lot, but that 2x only covers the cost of the implementation difference. In practice the factor is much lower since our methods that might fail are much more interesting than a few arithmetic operators as in the sample code elsewhere in this page.

Result Objects on the other hand do not sacrifice type safety at all. They wrap the success and failure information in a single class. So instead of "instanceof" they provide an "isSuccess()" and getters for both the success and failure objects. However, result objects are roughly 2x slower than using exceptions. It turns out that creating a new object every time is much more expensive than throwing an exception sometimes.

On top of that, exceptions are the language supplied way of indicating that a method might fail. There's no other way to tell from just the API which methods are expected to always (mostly) work and which are expected to report failure.

Exceptions are safer than sentinels, faster than result objects, and less surprising than either. I'm not suggesting that try/catch replace if/else, but exceptions are the right way to report failure, even in the business logic.

That said, I would like to point out that the two most frequent ways of substantially impacting performance I've run across are creating unnecessary objects and nested loops. If you have a choice between creating an exception or not creating an exception, don't create the exception. If you have a choice between creating an exception sometimes or creating another object all the time, then create the exception.

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1  
I decided to test the long term performance of the three implementations compared to a control implementation that checks for failure without reporting. The process has a failure rate of about 4%. An iteration of a test invokes the process 10000 times against one of the strategies. Each strategy is tested 1000 times and the last 900 times are used to generate the stats. Here are the average times in nanos: Control 338 Exception 429 Result 348 Sentinel 345 –  Fuwjax Apr 10 '11 at 10:39
1  
Just for fun I disabled fillInStackTrace in the exception test. Here are the times now: Control 347 Exception 351 Result 364 Sentinel 355 –  Fuwjax Apr 10 '11 at 10:52
    
Fuwjax, unless I am missing something (and I admit I've only read your SO post, not your blog post), it seems like your two comments above contradict your post. I presume lower numbers are better in your benchmark, right? In which case, generating exceptions with fillInStackTrace enabled (which is the default and usual behavior), results in slower performance than the other two techniques you describe. Am I missing something, or did you actually comment to disprove your post? –  Felix GV Jan 23 at 23:25

I think the first article refer to the act of traversing the call stack and creating a stack trace as being the expensive part, and while the second article doesn't say it, I think that is the most expensive part of object creation. John Rose has an article where he describes different techniques for speeding up exceptions. (Preallocating and reusing an exception, exceptions without stack traces, etc)

But still - I think this should be considered only a necessary evil, a last resort. Johns reason for doing this is to emulate features in other languages which aren't (yet) available in the JVM. You should NOT get into the habit of using exceptions for control flow. Especially not for performance reasons! As you yourself mention in #2, you risk masking serious bugs in your code this way, and it will be harder to maintain for new programmers.

Microbenchmarks in Java are surprisingly hard to get right (I've been told), especially when you get into JIT territory, so I really doubt that using exceptions is faster than "return" in real life. For instance, I suspect you have somewhere between 2 and 5 stack frames in your test? Now imagine your code will be invoked by a JSF component deployed by JBoss. Now you might have a stack trace which is several pages long.

Perhaps you could post your test code?

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Your link to John Rose's article is no longer valid. Do you know if his article is available elsewhere? –  markvgti Jun 26 '12 at 11:12

I've done some performance testing with JVM 1.5 and using exceptions was at least 2x slower. On average: Execution time on a trivially small method more than tripled (3x) with exceptions. A trivially small loop that had to catch the exception saw a 2x increase in self-time.

I've seen similar numbers in production code as well as micro benchmarks.

Exceptions should definately NOT be used for anything that's called frequently. Throwing a thousands of exceptions a second would cause a huge bottle neck.

For example, using "Integer.ParseInt(...)" to find all bad values in a very large text file--very bad idea. (I have seen this utility method kill performance on production code)

Using an exception to report a bad value on a user GUI form, probably not so bad from a performance standpoint.

Whether or not its a good design practice, I'd go with the rule: if the error is normal/expected, then use a return value. If it's abnormal, use an exception. For example: reading user inputs, bad values are normal--use an error code. Passing a value to an internal utility function, bad values should be filtered by calling code--use an exception.

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I worked on some of the first java midlets for the first java-capable mobile phones.

We quickly learnt to write 'c-style' java.

However, one thing that sticks in the mind was iterating over every element in a Vector - it was substantially quicker to not check the bounds and catch an array-index-out-of-bounds exception than it was to check the bounds in the loop code!

Just a data point for you.

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This is a comment, not an answer to the posted question. –  Nick Wiggill Aug 17 '12 at 12:58
    
I see! Java will check the array boundaries anyway (to raise an Exception upon off-bound access). So checking them in code is redundant. The lesson is then to use mandatory checks and catch standard exceptions. –  h2kyeong Mar 5 at 3:04
    
@h2kyeong I mean its quicker to do try { for(int i=0; ; i++) { do(vec.get(i)); } } catch(ArrayIndexOutOfBoundsException e) {} than to do for(int i=0; i<vec.size(); i++) { do(vec.get(i)); }. This may not be true on newer JVMs and CPUs. –  Will Mar 5 at 9:58
    
@Will What about storing vec.size() before the loop and replacing the call with it? Where does this one stand between your slow and fast loop? –  h2kyeong Mar 7 at 5:00
    
@h2kyeong yes even counting down is still slower than catching the exception ... on the early phones that aren't used now. That this is still true on any particular JVM+hardware combo needs testing. –  Will Mar 7 at 6:25

A while back I wrote a class to test the relative performance of converting strings to ints using two approaches: (1) call Integer.parseInt() and catch the exception, or (2) match the string with a regex and call parseInt() only if the match succeeds. I used the regex in the most efficient way I could (i.e., creating the Pattern and Matcher objects before intering the loop), and I didn't print or save the stacktraces from the exceptions.

For a list of ten thousand strings, if they were all valid numbers the parseInt() approach was four times as fast as the regex approach. But if only 80% of the strings were valid, the regex was twice as fast as parseInt(). And if 20% were valid, meaning the exception was thrown and caught 80% of the time, the regex was about twenty times as fast as parseInt().

I was surprised by the result, considering that the regex approach processes valid strings twice: once for the match and again for parseInt(). But throwing and catching exceptions more than made up for that. This kind of situation isn't likely to occur very often in the real world, but if it does, you definitely should not use the exception-catching technique. But if you're only validating user input or something like that, by all means use the parseInt() approach.

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which JVM did you use? is it still that slow with sun-jdk 6? –  bene Nov 18 '08 at 22:48
    
I dug it up and ran it again under JDK 1.6u10 before submitting that answer, and those are the results I posted. –  Alan Moore Nov 19 '08 at 18:32
    
This is very, very useful! Thanks. For my usual use cases I do need to parse user inputs (using something like Integer.ParseInt()) and I expect that most of the times the user input would be correct, so for my use case it seems like taking the occasional exception hit is the way to go. –  markvgti Jun 26 '12 at 10:48

Don't know if these topics relate, but I once wanted to implement one trick relying on current thread's stack trace: I wanted to discover the name of the method, which triggered the instantiation inside the instantiated class (yeap, the idea is crazy, I totally gave it up). So I discovered that calling Thread.currentThread().getStackTrace() is extremely slow (due to native dumpThreads method which it uses internally).

So Java Throwable, correspondingly, has a native method fillInStackTrace. I think that the killer-catch block described earlier somehow triggers the execution of this method.

But let me tell you another story...

In Scala some functional features are compiled in JVM using ControlThrowable, which extends Throwable and overrides its fillInStackTrace in a following way:

override def fillInStackTrace(): Throwable = this

So I adapted the test above (cycles amount are decreased by ten, my machine is a bit slower :):

class ControlException extends ControlThrowable

class T {
  var value = 0

  def reset = {
    value = 0
  }

  def method1(i: Int) = {
    value = ((value + i) / i) << 1
    if ((i & 0xfffffff) == 1000000000) {
      println("You'll never see this!")
    }
  }

  def method2(i: Int) = {
    value = ((value + i) / i) << 1
    if ((i & 0xfffffff) == 1000000000) {
      throw new Exception()
    }
  }

  def method3(i: Int) = {
    value = ((value + i) / i) << 1
    if ((i & 0x1) == 1) {
      throw new Exception()
    }
  }

  def method4(i: Int) = {
    value = ((value + i) / i) << 1
    if ((i & 0x1) == 1) {
      throw new ControlException()
    }
  }
}

class Main {
  var l = System.currentTimeMillis
  val t = new T
  for (i <- 1 to 10000000)
    t.method1(i)
  l = System.currentTimeMillis - l
  println("method1 took " + l + " ms, result was " + t.value)

  t.reset
  l = System.currentTimeMillis
  for (i <- 1 to 10000000) try {
    t.method2(i)
  } catch {
    case _ => println("You'll never see this")
  }
  l = System.currentTimeMillis - l
  println("method2 took " + l + " ms, result was " + t.value)

  t.reset
  l = System.currentTimeMillis
  for (i <- 1 to 10000000) try {
    t.method4(i)
  } catch {
    case _ => // do nothing
  }
  l = System.currentTimeMillis - l
  println("method4 took " + l + " ms, result was " + t.value)

  t.reset
  l = System.currentTimeMillis
  for (i <- 1 to 10000000) try {
    t.method3(i)
  } catch {
    case _ => // do nothing
  }
  l = System.currentTimeMillis - l
  println("method3 took " + l + " ms, result was " + t.value)

}

So, the results are:

method1 took 146 ms, result was 2
method2 took 159 ms, result was 2
method4 took 1551 ms, result was 2
method3 took 42492 ms, result was 2

You see, the only difference between method3 and method4 is that they throw different kinds of exceptions. Yeap, method4 is still slower than method1 and method2, but the difference is far more acceptable.

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Even if throwing an exception isn't slow, it's still a bad idea to throw exceptions for normal program flow. Used this way it is analogous to a GOTO...

I guess that doesn't really answer the question though. I'd imagine that the 'conventional' wisdom of throwing exceptions being slow was true in earlier java versions (< 1.4). Creating an exception requires that the VM create the entire stack trace. A lot has changed since then in the VM to speed things up and this is likely one area that has been improved.

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1  
It would be good to define "normal program flow". Much has been written about using checked exceptions as a business process failure and an unchecked exception for non-recoverable failures, so in a sense, a failure in business logic could still be thought of as normal flow. –  Spencer Kormos Nov 18 '08 at 22:43
2  
@Spencer K: An exception, as the name implies, means that an exceptional situation was discovered (a file went away, a network suddenly closed, ...). This implies that the situation was UNEXPECTED. If it is EXPECTED that the situation will occur, I'd not use an exception for it. –  Mecki Nov 18 '08 at 23:56
2  
@Mecki: right. I recently had a discussion with someone about this... They were writing a Validation framework and were throwing an exception in case of validation failure. I think this is a bad idea as this would be quite common. I'd rather see the method return a ValidationResult. –  user38051 Nov 19 '08 at 14:49
    
@Mecki: Well, Throwable is the superclass of Exception, and the name Throwable doesn't imply something unusual has happened. –  KajMagnus Nov 5 '11 at 3:42
    
In terms of control flow, an exception is analogous to a break or return, not a goto. –  Hot Licks Aug 26 '13 at 19:32

HotSpot is quite capable of removing exception code for system generated exceptions, so long as it is all inlined. However, explicitly created exception and those otherwise not removed spend a lot of time creating the stack trace. Override fillInStackTrace to see how this can affect performance.

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Just compare let's say Integer.parseInt to the following method, which just returns a default value in the case of unparseable data instead of throwing an Exception:

  public static int parseUnsignedInt(String s, int defaultValue) {
    final int strLength = s.length();
    if (strLength == 0)
      return defaultValue;
    int value = 0;
    for (int i=strLength-1; i>=0; i--) {
      int c = s.charAt(i);
      if (c > 47 && c < 58) {
        c -= 48;
        for (int j=strLength-i; j!=1; j--)
          c *= 10;
        value += c;
      } else {
        return defaultValue;
      }
    }
    return value < 0 ? /* übergebener wert > Integer.MAX_VALUE? */ defaultValue : value;
  }

As long as you apply both methods to "valid" data, they both will work at approximately the same rate (even although Integer.parseInt manages to handle more complex data). But as soon as you try to parse invalid data (e.g. to parse "abc" 1.000.000 times), the difference in performance should be essential.

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2  
+1 for german comments –  Guillaume Massé Nov 30 '11 at 5:50

Exceptions as the name suggests should be exceptional. Even if performance was not an issue I would suggest you used these rarely as exceptions tend to confuse people.

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I changed @Mecki 's answer above to have method1 return a boolean and a check in the calling method, as you cannot just replace an Exception with nothing. After two runs, method1 was still either the fastest or as fast as method2.

Here is snapshot of the code:

// Calculates without exception
public boolean method1(int i) {
    value = ((value + i) / i) << 1;
    // Will never be true
    return ((i & 0xFFFFFFF) == 1000000000);

}
....
   for (i = 1; i < 100000000; i++) {
            if (t.method1(i)) {
                System.out.println("Will never be true!");
            }
    }

and results:

Run 1

method1 took 841 ms, result was 2
method2 took 841 ms, result was 2
method3 took 85058 ms, result was 2

Run 2

method1 took 821 ms, result was 2
method2 took 838 ms, result was 2
method3 took 85929 ms, result was 2
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Exception performance in Java and C# leaves much to be desired.

As programmers this forces us to live by the rule "exceptions should be caused infrequently", simply for practical performance reasons.

However, as computer scientists, we should rebel against this problematic state. The person authoring a function often has no idea how often it will be called, or whether success or failure is more likely. Only the caller has this information. Trying to avoid exceptions leads to unclear API idoms where in some cases we have only clean-but-slow exception versions, and in other cases we have fast-but-clunky return-value errors, and in still other cases we end up with both. The library implementor may have to write and maintain two versions of APIs, and the caller has to decide which of two versions to use in each situation.

This is kind of a mess. If exceptions had better performance, we could avoid these clunky idioms and use exceptions as they were meant to be used... as a structured error return facility.

I'd really like to see exception mechanisms implemented using techniques closer to return-values, so we could have performance closer to return values.. since this is what we revert to in performance sensitive code.

Here is a code-sample that compares exception performance to error-return-value performance.

public class TestIt {

int value;


public int getValue() {
    return value;
}

public void reset() {
    value = 0;
}

public boolean baseline_null(boolean shouldfail, int recurse_depth) {
    if (recurse_depth <= 0) {
        return shouldfail;
    } else {
        return baseline_null(shouldfail,recurse_depth-1);
    }
}

public boolean retval_error(boolean shouldfail, int recurse_depth) {
    if (recurse_depth <= 0) {
        if (shouldfail) {
            return false;
        } else {
            return true;
        }
    } else {
        boolean nested_error = retval_error(shouldfail,recurse_depth-1);
        if (nested_error) {
            return true;
        } else {
            return false;
        }
    }
}

public void exception_error(boolean shouldfail, int recurse_depth) throws Exception {
    if (recurse_depth <= 0) {
        if (shouldfail) {
            throw new Exception();
        }
    } else {
        exception_error(shouldfail,recurse_depth-1);
    }

}

public static void main(String[] args) {
    int i;
    long l;
    TestIt t = new TestIt();
    int failures;

    int ITERATION_COUNT = 100000000;


    // (0) baseline null workload
    for (int recurse_depth = 2; recurse_depth <= 10; recurse_depth+=3) {
        for (float exception_freq = 0.0f; exception_freq <= 1.0f; exception_freq += 0.25f) {            
            int EXCEPTION_MOD = (exception_freq == 0.0f) ? ITERATION_COUNT+1 : (int)(1.0f / exception_freq);            

            failures = 0;
            long start_time = System.currentTimeMillis();
            t.reset();              
            for (i = 1; i < ITERATION_COUNT; i++) {
                boolean shoulderror = (i % EXCEPTION_MOD) == 0;
                t.baseline_null(shoulderror,recurse_depth);
            }
            long elapsed_time = System.currentTimeMillis() - start_time;
            System.out.format("baseline: recurse_depth %s, exception_freqeuncy %s (%s), time elapsed %s ms\n",
                    recurse_depth, exception_freq, failures,elapsed_time);
        }
    }


    // (1) retval_error
    for (int recurse_depth = 2; recurse_depth <= 10; recurse_depth+=3) {
        for (float exception_freq = 0.0f; exception_freq <= 1.0f; exception_freq += 0.25f) {            
            int EXCEPTION_MOD = (exception_freq == 0.0f) ? ITERATION_COUNT+1 : (int)(1.0f / exception_freq);            

            failures = 0;
            long start_time = System.currentTimeMillis();
            t.reset();              
            for (i = 1; i < ITERATION_COUNT; i++) {
                boolean shoulderror = (i % EXCEPTION_MOD) == 0;
                if (!t.retval_error(shoulderror,recurse_depth)) {
                    failures++;
                }
            }
            long elapsed_time = System.currentTimeMillis() - start_time;
            System.out.format("retval_error: recurse_depth %s, exception_freqeuncy %s (%s), time elapsed %s ms\n",
                    recurse_depth, exception_freq, failures,elapsed_time);
        }
    }

    // (2) exception_error
    for (int recurse_depth = 2; recurse_depth <= 10; recurse_depth+=3) {
        for (float exception_freq = 0.0f; exception_freq <= 1.0f; exception_freq += 0.25f) {            
            int EXCEPTION_MOD = (exception_freq == 0.0f) ? ITERATION_COUNT+1 : (int)(1.0f / exception_freq);            

            failures = 0;
            long start_time = System.currentTimeMillis();
            t.reset();              
            for (i = 1; i < ITERATION_COUNT; i++) {
                boolean shoulderror = (i % EXCEPTION_MOD) == 0;
                try {
                    t.exception_error(shoulderror,recurse_depth);
                } catch (Exception e) {
                    failures++;
                }
            }
            long elapsed_time = System.currentTimeMillis() - start_time;
            System.out.format("exception_error: recurse_depth %s, exception_freqeuncy %s (%s), time elapsed %s ms\n",
                    recurse_depth, exception_freq, failures,elapsed_time);              
        }
    }
}

}

And here are the results:

baseline: recurse_depth 2, exception_freqeuncy 0.0 (0), time elapsed 683 ms
baseline: recurse_depth 2, exception_freqeuncy 0.25 (0), time elapsed 790 ms
baseline: recurse_depth 2, exception_freqeuncy 0.5 (0), time elapsed 768 ms
baseline: recurse_depth 2, exception_freqeuncy 0.75 (0), time elapsed 749 ms
baseline: recurse_depth 2, exception_freqeuncy 1.0 (0), time elapsed 731 ms
baseline: recurse_depth 5, exception_freqeuncy 0.0 (0), time elapsed 923 ms
baseline: recurse_depth 5, exception_freqeuncy 0.25 (0), time elapsed 971 ms
baseline: recurse_depth 5, exception_freqeuncy 0.5 (0), time elapsed 982 ms
baseline: recurse_depth 5, exception_freqeuncy 0.75 (0), time elapsed 947 ms
baseline: recurse_depth 5, exception_freqeuncy 1.0 (0), time elapsed 937 ms
baseline: recurse_depth 8, exception_freqeuncy 0.0 (0), time elapsed 1154 ms
baseline: recurse_depth 8, exception_freqeuncy 0.25 (0), time elapsed 1149 ms
baseline: recurse_depth 8, exception_freqeuncy 0.5 (0), time elapsed 1133 ms
baseline: recurse_depth 8, exception_freqeuncy 0.75 (0), time elapsed 1117 ms
baseline: recurse_depth 8, exception_freqeuncy 1.0 (0), time elapsed 1116 ms
retval_error: recurse_depth 2, exception_freqeuncy 0.0 (0), time elapsed 742 ms
retval_error: recurse_depth 2, exception_freqeuncy 0.25 (24999999), time elapsed 743 ms
retval_error: recurse_depth 2, exception_freqeuncy 0.5 (49999999), time elapsed 734 ms
retval_error: recurse_depth 2, exception_freqeuncy 0.75 (99999999), time elapsed 723 ms
retval_error: recurse_depth 2, exception_freqeuncy 1.0 (99999999), time elapsed 728 ms
retval_error: recurse_depth 5, exception_freqeuncy 0.0 (0), time elapsed 920 ms
retval_error: recurse_depth 5, exception_freqeuncy 0.25 (24999999), time elapsed 1121   ms
retval_error: recurse_depth 5, exception_freqeuncy 0.5 (49999999), time elapsed 1037 ms
retval_error: recurse_depth 5, exception_freqeuncy 0.75 (99999999), time elapsed 1141   ms
retval_error: recurse_depth 5, exception_freqeuncy 1.0 (99999999), time elapsed 1130 ms
retval_error: recurse_depth 8, exception_freqeuncy 0.0 (0), time elapsed 1218 ms
retval_error: recurse_depth 8, exception_freqeuncy 0.25 (24999999), time elapsed 1334  ms
retval_error: recurse_depth 8, exception_freqeuncy 0.5 (49999999), time elapsed 1478 ms
retval_error: recurse_depth 8, exception_freqeuncy 0.75 (99999999), time elapsed 1637 ms
retval_error: recurse_depth 8, exception_freqeuncy 1.0 (99999999), time elapsed 1655 ms
exception_error: recurse_depth 2, exception_freqeuncy 0.0 (0), time elapsed 726 ms
exception_error: recurse_depth 2, exception_freqeuncy 0.25 (24999999), time elapsed 17487   ms
exception_error: recurse_depth 2, exception_freqeuncy 0.5 (49999999), time elapsed 33763   ms
exception_error: recurse_depth 2, exception_freqeuncy 0.75 (99999999), time elapsed 67367   ms
exception_error: recurse_depth 2, exception_freqeuncy 1.0 (99999999), time elapsed 66990 ms
exception_error: recurse_depth 5, exception_freqeuncy 0.0 (0), time elapsed 924 ms
exception_error: recurse_depth 5, exception_freqeuncy 0.25 (24999999), time elapsed 23775  ms
exception_error: recurse_depth 5, exception_freqeuncy 0.5 (49999999), time elapsed 46326 ms
exception_error: recurse_depth 5, exception_freqeuncy 0.75 (99999999), time elapsed 91707 ms
exception_error: recurse_depth 5, exception_freqeuncy 1.0 (99999999), time elapsed 91580 ms
exception_error: recurse_depth 8, exception_freqeuncy 0.0 (0), time elapsed 1144 ms
exception_error: recurse_depth 8, exception_freqeuncy 0.25 (24999999), time elapsed 30440 ms
exception_error: recurse_depth 8, exception_freqeuncy 0.5 (49999999), time elapsed 59116   ms
exception_error: recurse_depth 8, exception_freqeuncy 0.75 (99999999), time elapsed 116678 ms
exception_error: recurse_depth 8, exception_freqeuncy 1.0 (99999999), time elapsed 116477 ms

Checking and propagating return-values does add some cost vs the baseline-null call, and that cost is proportional to call-depth. At a call-chain depth of 8, the error-return-value checking version was about 27% slower than the basline version which did not check return values.

Exception performance, in comparison, is not a function of call-depth, but of exception frequency. However, the degredation as exception frequency increases is much more dramatic. At only a 25% error frequency, the code ran 24-TIMES slower. At an error frequency of 100%, the exception version is almost 100-TIMES slower.

This suggests to me that perhaps are making the wrong tradeoffs in our exception implementations. Exceptions could be faster, either by avoiding costly stalk-walks, or by outright turning them into compiler supported return-value checking. Until they do, we're stuck avoiding them when we want our code to run fast.

share|improve this answer

There are some people here suggesting that throwing exceptions should ONLY be for the exceptional situation that you don't expect to happen. I believe this is foolish. The only reason why I might be inclined to agree is that exceptions are slow. But this is a Java PROBLEM that should be fixed. Checked exceptions are ways to ensure that your code's client handles all noteable exceptions, something akin to ML's pattern matching. It is elegant but slow, and I hope this is changed in future versions.

Exceptions provide a way to require that people use your code responsibly. Consider the example where we have a getCustomer(int customerId) method. You could have a version that returns null if there is no customer by that id, or a version that throws an InvalidCustomerIdException in the event that it cannot find it.

I personally like the latter, because the caller has to explicitly handle this situation and the method never returns null. This will help avoid an NPE.

share|improve this answer

Why should exceptions be any slower than normal returns?

As long as you don't print the stacktrace to the terminal, save it into a file or something similar, the catch-block doesn't do any more work than other code-blocks. So, I can't imagine why "throw new my_cool_error()" should be that slow.

Good question and I'm looking forward to further information on this topic!

share|improve this answer
6  
The exception has to capture the information about the stack trace, even if it doesn't actually get used. –  Jon Skeet Nov 18 '08 at 15:44

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