Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm extremely confused by the proper behavior of UITableView cell rendering. Here's the situation:

I have a list of 250 items that are loading into a table view, each with an image. To optimize the image download, I followed along with Apple's LazyTableImages sample code... pretty much following it exactly. Really good system... for reference, here's the cell renderer within the Apple sample code:

- (UITableViewCell *)tableView:(UITableView *)tableView cellForRowAtIndexPath:(NSIndexPath *)indexPath
{
    // customize the appearance of table view cells
    //
    static NSString *CellIdentifier = @"LazyTableCell";
    static NSString *PlaceholderCellIdentifier = @"PlaceholderCell";

    // add a placeholder cell while waiting on table data
    int nodeCount = [self.entries count];

    if (nodeCount == 0 && indexPath.row == 0)
    {
        UITableViewCell *cell = [tableView dequeueReusableCellWithIdentifier:PlaceholderCellIdentifier];
        if (cell == nil)
        {
            cell = [[[UITableViewCell alloc] initWithStyle:UITableViewCellStyleSubtitle
                                           reuseIdentifier:PlaceholderCellIdentifier] autorelease];   
            cell.detailTextLabel.textAlignment = UITextAlignmentCenter;
            cell.selectionStyle = UITableViewCellSelectionStyleNone;
        }

        cell.detailTextLabel.text = @"Loading…";

        return cell;
    }

    UITableViewCell *cell = [tableView dequeueReusableCellWithIdentifier:CellIdentifier];
    if (cell == nil)
    {
        cell = [[[UITableViewCell alloc] initWithStyle:UITableViewCellStyleSubtitle
                                       reuseIdentifier:CellIdentifier] autorelease];
        cell.selectionStyle = UITableViewCellSelectionStyleNone;
    }

    // Leave cells empty if there's no data yet
    if (nodeCount > 0)
    {
        // Set up the cell...
        AppRecord *appRecord = [self.entries objectAtIndex:indexPath.row];

        cell.textLabel.text = appRecord.appName;
        cell.detailTextLabel.text = appRecord.artist;

        // Only load cached images; defer new downloads until scrolling ends
        if (!appRecord.appIcon)
        {
            if (self.tableView.dragging == NO && self.tableView.decelerating == NO)
            {
                [self startIconDownload:appRecord forIndexPath:indexPath];
            }
            // if a download is deferred or in progress, return a placeholder image
            cell.imageView.image = [UIImage imageNamed:@"Placeholder.png"];                
        }
        else
        {
           cell.imageView.image = appRecord.appIcon;
        }

    }

    return cell;
}

So – my implementation of Apple's LazyTableImages system has one crucial flaw: it starts all downloads for all images immediately. Now, if I remove this line:

//[self startIconDownload:appRecord forIndexPath:indexPath];

Then the system behaves exactly like you would expect: new images load as their placeholders scroll into view. However, the initial view cells do not automatically load their images without that prompt in the cell renderer. So, I have a problem: with the prompt in the cell renderer, all images load at once. Without the prompt, the initial view doesn't load. Now, this works fine in Apple sample code, which got me wondering what was going on with mine. It's almost like it was building all cells up front rather than just the 8 or so that would appear within the display. So, I got looking into it, and this is indeed the case... my table is building 250 unique cells! I didn't think the UITableView worked like this, I guess I thought it only built as many items as were needed to populate the table. Is this the case, or is it correct that it would build all 250 cells up front?

Also – related question: I've tried to compare my implementation against the Apple LazyTableImages sample, but have discovered that NSLog appears to be disabled within the Apple sample code (which makes direct behavior comparisons extremely difficult). Is that just a simple publish setting somewhere, or has Apple somehow locked down their samples so that you can't log output at runtime?

Thanks!

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

You certainly should not have an actual UITableViewCell instance for every row in the table. You should only see a few more instances than are visible in the UI. That is where your problem is. It doesn't have anything to do with the loading of images.

The only time I've seen a large number of cells instantiated when the cells where dequeued was when a coder had altered the frame of the tableview to make it much larger than the screen. The tableview retains enough cells from being dequeued to carpet its own frame regardless of what is visible. If the frame is to big then you get a lot of cells in queue.

NSLog does work in Apple examples so if you can't get NSLog output you've got something weird going on with the dev tools themselves.

You might want to shutdown Xcode and the simulator and restart and see if that clears up the odd behavior.

share|improve this answer
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Oh my... mustISignUp is absolutely correct in saying "you definitely have a deeper underlying problem". I have variable-height table rows, and I was doing all height calculation and data storage on the rows themselves rather than on the data model that populated them. As a result, ALL cells were being created and populated by my heightForRowAtIndexPath method which was reading cell height from the cell objects. SO – lesson learned.

Thanks mustISignUp, and I love your username.

share|improve this answer
1  
hehe, glad you got it sorted. –  hooleyhoop Jun 7 '10 at 19:06

NSLog definitely isn't disabled within the Apple sample code. I don't know why you can't see it but you definitely have a deeper underlying problem.

Anyway, for your comparison:- if you have 6 rows on screen -tableView: cellForRowAtIndexPath: is called 6 times with index [0, 0] - [0, 5].

So, is that what you are seeing? How many times is -cellForRowAtIndexPath being called?

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.