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Is there any way to compile from Java to standalone (or library) machine code without requiring a JVM?

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closed as not a real question by Andrew Barber, M42, burning_LEGION, Bill the Lizard Feb 27 '13 at 12:15

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"compile" is the word you're looking for (rather than "compilate"). –  T.J. Crowder Jun 7 '10 at 17:47
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If your interest is speed, don't bother unless you're looking at a platform that HotSpot (Sun's JVM) doesn't support. HotSpot compiles bytecode to native code on the fly wherever a "hotspot" of execution path (something that gets run a lot) shows up, and it's very good at it. But if you're looking to avoid requiring a JVM, yes, look at the gcj James pointed you to. –  T.J. Crowder Jun 7 '10 at 17:53
    
Yet another reason is protection against Java decompilers. As for HotSpot vs native compiler (vs JRockit vs IBM vs GCC vs Visual C++ vs hand-writing-CPU-instructions-in-hex) performance, it depends on the application, so YMMV. –  Dmitry Leskov Jun 8 '10 at 4:53
    
I found one interesting development by Oracle for there Oracle database called JServer Accelerator. It was also designed to be platform Dependent in some way by compiling not to bytecodes but to C code. docs.oracle.com/cd/A87860_01/doc/java.817/a83727/jtools5.htm –  supernova Apr 20 at 16:14
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3 Answers 3

I've never used this functionality, but gcc comes with that ability:

http://gcc.gnu.org/java/

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+1, cool, I didn't know about that! –  FrustratedWithFormsDesigner Jun 7 '10 at 17:47
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Yeah, gcj is the most well-known one. @isola009: Keep in mind that when compiling to native code, you will probably be working with a subset (possibly a dramatically small subset) of the libraries that Java normally has by default. Gnu's is pretty good, by all accounts, but well behind the current JDK. –  T.J. Crowder Jun 7 '10 at 17:51
    
It is well behind all JDKS starting with 1.2. I've encountered many support problems with people accidentally running GNU classpath instead of Java, and they were all without exception cured by uninstalling it and using a Sun JDK. –  EJP Jun 8 '10 at 3:09
    
Excelsior JET includes a licensed implementation of the Java SE 6 standard library and has passed the official compliance tests (JCK). It is at the 6u18 level now, the next version is expected to support 6u20. –  Dmitry Leskov Jun 8 '10 at 4:50
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Yes, the JIT in the JVM does exactly that for you.

In fact it can be produce faster code than compiling the code in advance as it can generate code optimised for the specific platofrm based on how the code is rused at runtime.

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Yes, you are correct that the JIT does it and does it very well. It does not make a stand-alone executable, but then the OP wasn't asking about that.... –  Bill K Jun 7 '10 at 21:19
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Excelsior JET is a commercial Java to native code compiler.

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Just in case, there are free licenses for non-commercial projects. –  Dmitry Leskov Jun 8 '10 at 4:57
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