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I am looking for good ideas for implementing a generic way to have a single line (or anonymous delegate) of code execute with a timeout.

TemperamentalClass tc = new TemperamentalClass();
tc.DoSomething();  // normally runs in 30 sec.  Want to error at 1 min

I'm looking for a solution that can elegantly be implemented in many places where my code interacts with temperamental code (that I can't change).

In addition, I would like to have the offending "timed out" code stopped from executing further if possible.

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33  
Just a reminder to anyone looking at the answers below: Many of them use Thread.Abort which can be very bad. Please read the various comments about this before implementing Abort in your code. It can be appropriate on occasions, but those are rare. If you don't understand exactly what Abort does or don't need it, please implement one of the solutions below that doesn't use it. They are the solutions that don't have as many votes because they didn't fit the needs of my question. –  chilltemp Apr 15 '10 at 21:59
    
Thanks for the advisory. +1 vote. –  QueueHammer Nov 4 '10 at 16:00
4  
For details on the dangers of thread.Abort, read this article from Eric Lippert: blogs.msdn.com/b/ericlippert/archive/2010/02/22/… –  JohnW Nov 14 '11 at 13:49

8 Answers 8

up vote 80 down vote accepted

The really tricky part here was killing the long running task through passing the executor thread from the Action back to a place where it could be aborted. I accomplished this with the use of a wrapped delegate that passes out the thread to kill into a local variable in the method that created the lambda.

I submit this example, for your enjoyment. The method you are really interested in is CallWithTimeout. This will cancel the long running thread by aborting it, and swallowing the ThreadAbortException:

Usage:

class Program
{

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        //try the five second method with a 6 second timeout
        CallWithTimeout(FiveSecondMethod, 6000);

        //try the five second method with a 4 second timeout
        //this will throw a timeout exception
        CallWithTimeout(FiveSecondMethod, 4000);
    }

    static void FiveSecondMethod()
    {
        Thread.Sleep(5000);
    }

The static method doing the work:

    static void CallWithTimeout(Action action, int timeoutMilliseconds)
    {
        Thread threadToKill = null;
        Action wrappedAction = () =>
        {
            threadToKill = Thread.CurrentThread;
            action();
        };

        IAsyncResult result = wrappedAction.BeginInvoke(null, null);
        if (result.AsyncWaitHandle.WaitOne(timeoutMilliseconds))
        {
            wrappedAction.EndInvoke(result);
        }
        else
        {
            threadToKill.Abort();
            throw new TimeoutException();
        }
    }

}
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2  
Why the catch(ThreadAbortException)? AFAIK you cannot really catch a ThreadAbortException (it will be rethrown after when the catch block is left). –  csgero Nov 18 '08 at 16:57
7  
Thread.Abort() is very dangerous to use, It shouldn't be used with regular code, only code that is guaranteed to be safe should be aborted, such as code that is Cer.Safe, uses constrained execution regions and safe handles. It shouldn't be done for any code. –  Pop Catalin Nov 19 '08 at 9:04
10  
While Thread.Abort() is bad, it is no where near as bad as a process running out of control and using every CPU cycle & byte of memory that the PC has. But you are right to point out the potential problems to anyone else who may think this code is useful. –  chilltemp Nov 19 '08 at 15:37
19  
I can't believe this is the accepted answer, someone must not be reading the comments here, or the answer was accepted before the comments and that person does not check his replies page. Thread.Abort is not a solution, it's just another problem you need to solve! –  Lasse V. Karlsen May 15 '09 at 15:21
13  
You are the one not reading the comments. As chilltemp says above, he's calling code that he has NO control over - and wants it to abort. He has no option other than Thread.Abort() if he wants this to run within his process. You are right that Thread.Abort is bad - but like chilltemp says, other things are worse! –  TheSoftwareJedi May 15 '09 at 15:55

*We are using code like this heavily in productio*n:

var result = WaitFor<Result>.Run(1.Minutes(), () => service.GetSomeFragileResult());

Implementation is open-sourced, works efficiently even in parallel computing scenarios and is available as a part of Lokad Shared Libraries

/// <summary>
/// Helper class for invoking tasks with timeout. Overhead is 0,005 ms.
/// </summary>
/// <typeparam name="TResult">The type of the result.</typeparam>
[Immutable]
public sealed class WaitFor<TResult>
{
    readonly TimeSpan _timeout;

    /// <summary>
    /// Initializes a new instance of the <see cref="WaitFor{T}"/> class, 
    /// using the specified timeout for all operations.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="timeout">The timeout.</param>
    public WaitFor(TimeSpan timeout)
    {
        _timeout = timeout;
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Executes the spcified function within the current thread, aborting it
    /// if it does not complete within the specified timeout interval. 
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="function">The function.</param>
    /// <returns>result of the function</returns>
    /// <remarks>
    /// The performance trick is that we do not interrupt the current
    /// running thread. Instead, we just create a watcher that will sleep
    /// until the originating thread terminates or until the timeout is
    /// elapsed.
    /// </remarks>
    /// <exception cref="ArgumentNullException">if function is null</exception>
    /// <exception cref="TimeoutException">if the function does not finish in time </exception>
    public TResult Run(Func<TResult> function)
    {
        if (function == null) throw new ArgumentNullException("function");

        var sync = new object();
        var isCompleted = false;

        WaitCallback watcher = obj =>
            {
                var watchedThread = obj as Thread;

                lock (sync)
                {
                    if (!isCompleted)
                    {
                        Monitor.Wait(sync, _timeout);
                    }
                }
                   // CAUTION: the call to Abort() can be blocking in rare situations
                    // http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ty8d3wta.aspx
                    // Hence, it should not be called with the 'lock' as it could deadlock
                    // with the 'finally' block below.

                    if (!isCompleted)
                    {
                        watchedThread.Abort();
                    }
        };

        try
        {
            ThreadPool.QueueUserWorkItem(watcher, Thread.CurrentThread);
            return function();
        }
        catch (ThreadAbortException)
        {
            // This is our own exception.
            Thread.ResetAbort();

            throw new TimeoutException(string.Format("The operation has timed out after {0}.", _timeout));
        }
        finally
        {
            lock (sync)
            {
                isCompleted = true;
                Monitor.Pulse(sync);
            }
        }
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Executes the spcified function within the current thread, aborting it
    /// if it does not complete within the specified timeout interval.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="timeout">The timeout.</param>
    /// <param name="function">The function.</param>
    /// <returns>result of the function</returns>
    /// <remarks>
    /// The performance trick is that we do not interrupt the current
    /// running thread. Instead, we just create a watcher that will sleep
    /// until the originating thread terminates or until the timeout is
    /// elapsed.
    /// </remarks>
    /// <exception cref="ArgumentNullException">if function is null</exception>
    /// <exception cref="TimeoutException">if the function does not finish in time </exception>
    public static TResult Run(TimeSpan timeout, Func<TResult> function)
    {
        return new WaitFor<TResult>(timeout).Run(function);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
3  
This what I implemented, It can handle parameters and return value, which I prefer and needed. Thanks Rinat –  Gabriel Mongeon Jul 12 '10 at 20:11
6  
what is [Immutable]? –  raklos Jan 29 '11 at 13:26
1  
Just an attribute we use to mark immutable classes (immutability is verified by Mono Cecil in unit tests) –  Rinat Abdullin Feb 1 '11 at 16:47
6  
This is a deadlock waiting to happen (I’m surprised you haven’t observed it yet). Your call to watchedThread.Abort() is inside a lock, which also needs to be acquired in the finally block. This means while the finally block is waiting for the lock (because the watchedThread has it between Wait() returning and Thread.Abort()), the watchedThread.Abort() call will also block indefinitely waiting for the finally to finish (which it never will). Therad.Abort() can block if a protected region of code is running - causing deadlocks, see - msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ty8d3wta.aspx –  trickdev Apr 12 '11 at 10:10
2  
Upd: fixed the post with the corrected code. –  Rinat Abdullin Apr 15 '11 at 8:47

Well, you could do things with delegates (BeginInvoke, with a callback setting a flag - and the original code waiting for that flag or timeout) - but the problem is that it is very hard to shut down the running code. For example, killing (or pausing) a thread is dangerous... so I don't think there is an easy way to do this robustly.

I'll post this, but note it is not ideal - it doesn't stop the long-running task, and it doesn't clean up properly on failure.

    static void Main()
    {
        DoWork(OK, 5000);
        DoWork(Nasty, 5000);
    }
    static void OK()
    {
        Thread.Sleep(1000);
    }
    static void Nasty()
    {
        Thread.Sleep(10000);
    }
    static void DoWork(Action action, int timeout)
    {
        ManualResetEvent evt = new ManualResetEvent(false);
        AsyncCallback cb = delegate {evt.Set();};
        IAsyncResult result = action.BeginInvoke(cb, null);
        if (evt.WaitOne(timeout))
        {
            action.EndInvoke(result);
        }
        else
        {
            throw new TimeoutException();
        }
    }
    static T DoWork<T>(Func<T> func, int timeout)
    {
        ManualResetEvent evt = new ManualResetEvent(false);
        AsyncCallback cb = delegate { evt.Set(); };
        IAsyncResult result = func.BeginInvoke(cb, null);
        if (evt.WaitOne(timeout))
        {
            return func.EndInvoke(result);
        }
        else
        {
            throw new TimeoutException();
        }
    }
share|improve this answer
2  
I'm perfectly happy killing something that's gone rouge on me. Its still better than letting it eat CPU cycles until the next reboot (this is part of a windows service). –  chilltemp Nov 18 '08 at 16:09
2  
In that case, consider spawning an AppDomain that you can kill... –  Marc Gravell Nov 18 '08 at 16:11
2  
result.AsyncWaitHandle can be used, no manual reset needed –  TheSoftwareJedi Nov 18 '08 at 16:57
    
@Marc : I am great fan of yours. But, this time, I wonder, why u did not use result.AsyncWaitHandle as mentioned by TheSoftwareJedi. Any benefit of using ManualResetEvent over AsyncWaitHandle? –  Anand Patel Dec 19 '11 at 17:30
1  
@Anand well, this was some years ago so I can't answer from memory - but "easy to understand" counts for a lot in threaded code –  Marc Gravell Dec 19 '11 at 18:28

Some minor changes to Pop Catalin's great answer:

  • Func instead of Action
  • Throw exception on bad timeout value
  • Calling EndInvoke in case of timeout

Overloads have been added to support signaling worker to cancel execution:

public static T Invoke<T> (Func<CancelEventArgs, T> function, TimeSpan timeout) {
    if (timeout.TotalMilliseconds <= 0)
        throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException ("timeout");

    CancelEventArgs args = new CancelEventArgs (false);
    IAsyncResult functionResult = function.BeginInvoke (args, null, null);
    WaitHandle waitHandle = functionResult.AsyncWaitHandle;
    if (!waitHandle.WaitOne (timeout)) {
        args.Cancel = true; // flag to worker that it should cancel!
        /* •————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————•
           | IMPORTANT: Always call EndInvoke to complete your asynchronous call.   |
           | http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/2e08f6yc(VS.80).aspx           |
           | (even though we arn't interested in the result)                        |
           •————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————• */
        ThreadPool.UnsafeRegisterWaitForSingleObject (waitHandle,
            (state, timedOut) => function.EndInvoke (functionResult),
            null, -1, true);
        throw new TimeoutException ();
    }
    else
        return function.EndInvoke (functionResult);
}

public static T Invoke<T> (Func<T> function, TimeSpan timeout) {
    return Invoke (args => function (), timeout); // ignore CancelEventArgs
}

public static void Invoke (Action<CancelEventArgs> action, TimeSpan timeout) {
    Invoke<int> (args => { // pass a function that returns 0 & ignore result
        action (args);
        return 0;
    }, timeout);
}

public static void TryInvoke (Action action, TimeSpan timeout) {
    Invoke (args => action (), timeout); // ignore CancelEventArgs
}
share|improve this answer
    
any sample code call Invoke method ? –  Kiquenet Mar 28 '11 at 13:48
    
Invoke(e => { // ... if (error) e.Cancel = true; return 5; }, TimeSpan.FromSeconds(5)); –  George Tsiokos Apr 4 '11 at 21:07
1  
It's worth pointing out that in this answer the 'timed out' method is left running unless it can be modified to politely choose to exit when flagged with 'cancel'. –  David Eison Sep 30 '11 at 4:42
    
David, that's what the CancellationToken type (.NET 4.0) was specifically created to address. In this answer, I used CancelEventArgs so the worker could poll args.Cancel to see if it should exit, although this should be re-implemented with the CancellationToken for .NET 4.0. –  George Tsiokos Dec 21 '11 at 15:55
    
A usage note on this that confused me for a little while: You need two try/catch blocks if your Function/Action code may throw an exception after timeout. You need one try/catch around the call to Invoke to catch TimeoutException. You need a second inside your Function/Action to capture and swallow/log any exception that may occur after your timeout throws. Otherwise the app will terminate with an unhandled exception (my use case is ping testing a WCF connection on a tighter timeout than specified in app.config) –  fiat Oct 19 '12 at 0:20

This is how I'd do it:

public static class Runner
{
    public static void Run(Action action, TimeSpan timeout)
    {
        IAsyncResult ar = action.BeginInvoke(null, null);
        if (ar.AsyncWaitHandle.WaitOne(timeout))
            action.EndInvoke(ar); // This is necesary so that any exceptions thrown by action delegate is rethrown on completion
        else
            throw new TimeoutException("Action failed to complete using the given timeout!");
    }
}
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3  
this doesn't stop the executing task –  TheSoftwareJedi Nov 18 '08 at 17:08
2  
Not all tasks are safe to stop, all kinds of issues can arrive, deadlocks, resource leakage, corruption of state... It shouldn't be done in the general case. –  Pop Catalin Nov 19 '08 at 9:44

I just knocked this out now so it might need some improvement, but will do what you want. It is a simple console app, but demonstrates the principles needed.

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Threading;


namespace TemporalThingy
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            Action action = () => Thread.Sleep(10000);
            DoSomething(action, 5000);
            Console.ReadKey();
        }

        static void DoSomething(Action action, int timeout)
        {
            EventWaitHandle waitHandle = new EventWaitHandle(false, EventResetMode.ManualReset);
            AsyncCallback callback = ar => waitHandle.Set();
            action.BeginInvoke(callback, null);

            if (!waitHandle.WaitOne(timeout))
                throw new Exception("Failed to complete in the timeout specified.");
        }
    }

}
share|improve this answer
    
Nice. The only thing I would add is that he might prefer to throw System.TimeoutException rather than just System.Exception –  Joel Coehoorn Nov 18 '08 at 16:30
    
Oh, yeah: and I'd wrap that in it's own class as well. –  Joel Coehoorn Nov 18 '08 at 16:32
    
result.AsyncWaitHandle can be used, no manual reset needed. –  TheSoftwareJedi Nov 18 '08 at 16:35

What about using Thread.Join(int timeout)?

public static void CallWithTimeout(Action act, int millisecondsTimeout)
{
    var thread = new Thread(new ThreadStart(act));
    thread.Start();
    if (!thread.Join(millisecondsTimeout))
    	throw new Exception("Timed out");
}
share|improve this answer
1  
That would notify the calling method of a problem, but not abort the offending thread. –  chilltemp Jan 11 '10 at 21:27
    
I'm not sure that's correct. It's not clear from the documentation what happens to the worker thread when the Join timeout elapses. –  Matthew Lowe Aug 18 '10 at 14:01

My implementation creating new thread and killing task after timeout looks like this:

public static void Execute(Action action, int timeout)
{
    Exception exception = null;
    var thread = new Thread(() =>
                                {
                                    try
                                    {
                                        action();
                                    }
                                    catch (Exception e)
                                    {
                                        exception = e;
                                    }
                                });
    thread.Start();
    var completed = thread.Join(timeout);
    if (!completed)
    {
        thread.Abort();
        throw new TimeoutException();
    }

    if (exception != null)
    {
        throw exception;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
two limitations I see in my solution: exception call stack will be lost and ThreadPool is not used –  Vitaliy Ulantikov Mar 9 '13 at 11:08
    
Avoiding Thread.Abort is always a good idea. Avoiding it on a thread you did not create is even better. How To Stop a Thread in .NET (and Why Thread.Abort is Evil) interact-sw.co.uk/iangblog/2004/11/12/cancellation Dangers of Thread.Abort by Eric Lippert blogs.msdn.com/b/ericlippert/archive/2010/02/22/… –  Kiquenet Apr 15 '13 at 7:54

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