Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm attempting to solve a set of equations of the form Ax = 0. A is known 6x6 matrix and I've written the below code using SVD to get the vector x which works to a certain extent. The answer is approximately correct but not good enough to be useful to me, how can I improve the precision of the calculation? Lowering eps below 1.e-4 causes the function to fail.

from numpy.linalg import *
from numpy import *

A = matrix([[0.624010149127497 ,0.020915658603923 ,0.838082638087629 ,62.0778180312547 ,-0.336 ,0],
[0.669649399820597 ,0.344105317421833 ,0.0543868015800246 ,49.0194290212841 ,-0.267 ,0],
[0.473153758252885 ,0.366893577716959 ,0.924972565581684 ,186.071352614705 ,-1 ,0],
[0.0759305208803158 ,0.356365401030535 ,0.126682113674883 ,175.292109352674 ,0 ,-5.201],
[0.91160934274653 ,0.32447818779582 ,0.741382053883291 ,0.11536775372698 ,0 ,-0.034],
[0.480860406786873 ,0.903499596111067 ,0.542581424762866 ,32.782593418975 ,0 ,-1]])

def null(A, eps=1e-3):
  u,s,vh = svd(A,full_matrices=1,compute_uv=1)
  null_space = compress(s <= eps, vh, axis=0)
  return null_space.T

NS = null(A)
print "Null space equals ",NS,"\n"
print dot(A,NS)
share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 9 down vote accepted

A is full rank --- so x is 0

Since it looks like you need a least-squares solution, i.e. min ||A*x|| s.t. ||x|| = 1, do the SVD such that [U S V] = svd(A) and the last column of V (assuming that the columns are sorted in order of decreasing singular values) is x.

I.e.,

U =

     -0.23024     -0.23241      0.28225     -0.59968     -0.04403     -0.67213
      -0.1818     -0.16426      0.18132      0.39639      0.83929     -0.21343
     -0.69008     -0.59685     -0.18202      0.10908     -0.20664      0.28255
     -0.65033      0.73984    -0.066702     -0.12447     0.088364       0.0442
  -0.00045131    -0.043887      0.71552     -0.32745       0.1436      0.59855
     -0.12164      0.11611       0.5813      0.59046     -0.47173     -0.25029


S =

       269.62            0            0            0            0            0
            0       4.1038            0            0            0            0
            0            0        1.656            0            0            0
            0            0            0       0.6416            0            0
            0            0            0            0      0.49215            0
            0            0            0            0            0   0.00027528


V =

    -0.002597     -0.11341      0.68728     -0.12654      0.70622    0.0050325
   -0.0024567     0.018021       0.4439      0.85217     -0.27644    0.0028357
   -0.0036713      -0.1539      0.55281      -0.4961      -0.6516   0.00013067
      -0.9999    -0.011204   -0.0068651    0.0013713    0.0014128    0.0052698
    0.0030264      0.17515      0.02341    -0.020917   -0.0054032      0.98402
     0.012996     -0.96557     -0.15623      0.10603     0.014754      0.17788

So,

x =

    0.0050325
    0.0028357
   0.00013067
    0.0052698
      0.98402
      0.17788

And, ||A*x|| = 0.00027528 as opposed to your previous solution for x where ||A*x_old|| = 0.079442

share|improve this answer
    
x=0 is a solution to the problem, but an uninteresting one. The true solution to the problem, arrived at by different means is: [0.880057009282733,0.571293018023548,0.0664250041765576,1,186.758799941964,33.75‌​79819749057]T –  Ainsworth Jun 7 '10 at 20:50
    
Are you sure? I see some non-zero elements in the result of A*x --- [-0.056356 -0.055643 -7.3896e-013 -0.0043278 0.004483 -2.1316e-014] –  Jacob Jun 7 '10 at 20:52
    
Unless of course, you don't want the null space, but the least-squares solution, i.e. min ||A*x|| s.t. ||x|| = 1 –  Jacob Jun 7 '10 at 20:53
1  
I agree with Jacob. A has full rank. The reason that you are getting errors for an eps of 1e-4 is because the smallest singular value of the matrix is 2.75282332e-04. In other words, you need to have singular values that are 0 (within floating point accuracy) to have a null space with vectors other than the zero vector. By the way, Matlab gives x as 0 as well. –  Justin Peel Jun 7 '10 at 21:12
1  
Updated with the least-squares solution. –  Jacob Jun 7 '10 at 22:07

Attention: There might be confusion with the SVD in python vs. matlab-syntax(?): in python, numpy.linalg.svd(A) returns matrices u,s,v such that u*s*v = A (strictly: dot(u, dot(diag(s), v) = A, because s is a vector and not a 2D-matrix in numpy).

The uppermost Answer is correct in that sense that usually you write u*s*vh = A and vh is returned, and this answer discusses v AND NOT vh.

To make a long story short: if you have matrices u,s,v such that u*s*v = A, then the last rows of v, not the last colums of v, describe the nullspace.

Edit: [for people like me:] each of the last rows is a vector v0 such that A*v0 = 0 (if the corresponding singular value is 0)

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.