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How do I access a static member in a class with all static methods?

I want to have a group of related functions but also have some important data members initialized before any of these functions are called. I thought a class with only static members would be the way to go. Compiler in VS2008 doesn't like me trying to access "a".

Surely I'm missing something small but still very confused. :P (Even without the invalid access of "a" the constructor isn't called when calling testMethod() from main.

class IPAddressResolver
{
private:

public:
    static int a;
    IPAddressResolver();
    static void TestMethod();
};


IPAddressResolver::IPAddressResolver()
{
    IPAddressResolver::a = 0;
    cout << "Creating IPAddressResolver" << endl;
}

void IPAddressResolver::TestMethod()
{
    cout << "testMethod" << endl;
}
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You need should qualify this question with the error you're receiving. It is almost certainly an unresolved external linker error and Peter's answer is correct. Nevertheless, you should qualify your question with the relevant information. –  Nathan Ernst Jun 8 '10 at 0:32

3 Answers 3

up vote 10 down vote accepted

You need to define your static data member outside of the function, like

class IPAddressResolver
{
private:
    static int a;
    IPAddressResolver();
public:
    static void TestMethod();
};

int IPAddressResolver::a = 0;

void IPAddressResolver::TestMethod()
{
    cout << "testMethod" << endl;
}

Your constructor is not called, since you don't create a new instance of the class. For a static utility class, you don't need instances, so you can omit the constructor altogether. Alternatively, you might want to declare it private to make it explicit that the class shall not be instantiated (see above).

Notes:

  • it is not recommended to use public fields in classes, so I turned a into private,
  • static utility classes are usually stateless, so if you need to have fields within your class, this maybe a sign that the class would better be a Singleton.
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Ah. I totally forgot about this. :P Been using C# for too long. –  bobber205 Jun 7 '10 at 20:42
    
Is there a way to properly initalize members outside of this method? I would like to use a constructor like you can in C#. –  bobber205 Jun 7 '10 at 20:42
    
@bobber, int IPAddressResolver::a = 0; does initialize a to 0. If you want a constructor, consider the Singleton approach as I hinted in my notes. –  Péter Török Jun 7 '10 at 20:46
    
I find it very strange that you can do this... surely the fact that a was declared private would mean that only an instance of IPAddressResolver can change the value of a. I would have thought you would need some sort of public function to init the static data –  thecoshman Nov 14 '10 at 13:48
    
@ thecoshman, the line int IPAddressResolver::a = 0 is not (only) an assignment but the definition of this data member. As such, the linker enforces that there exists exactly one such line in the whole compiled codebase. Thus, the creator of the class must provide it (typically in the corresponding cpp file), and noone else can later provide an alternative definition. So this is not breaking encapsulation. Now, as to why you need to separately define static class members, I believe this is a language design decision, in order to maintain backward compatibility with C. –  Péter Török Nov 14 '10 at 14:53

Somewhere outside of the class definition, you need to define and initialize your static data members associated with that class.

Easiest is just to put

int IPAddressResolver::a = 0;

in your IPAddressResolver.cpp file.

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I want to have a group of related functions but also have some important data members initialized before any of these functions are called

Sounds to me like you want a Singleton, not a class with only static members.

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