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I'm no database expert, but I have enough knowledge to get myself into trouble, as is the case here. This query

SELECT DISTINCT p.* 
  FROM points p, areas a, contacts c 
 WHERE (    p.latitude > 43.6511659465 
        AND p.latitude < 43.6711659465 
        AND p.longitude > -79.4677941889 
        AND p.longitude < -79.4477941889) 
   AND p.resource_type = 'Contact' 
   AND c.user_id = 6

is extremely slow. The points table has fewer than 2000 records, but it takes about 8 seconds to execute. There are indexes on the latitude and longitude columns. Removing the clause concering the resource_type and user_id make no difference.

The latitude and longitude fields are both formatted as number(15,10) -- I need the precision for some calculations.

There are many, many other queries in this project where points are compared, but no execution time problems. What's going on?

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Please post an EXPLAIN. Distinct is frequently a performance issue. Also, make sure latitude and longitude are indexed. –  Frank Farmer Jun 8 '10 at 0:51
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4 Answers

up vote 11 down vote accepted

Did you forget something from your actual query? It's missing ANSI-89 joins between the three tables, giving you a cartesian product but only pulling out the POINTS records.

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2  
Not only that but AND c.user_id=6 is doing nothing, since no results from contacts are returned. –  VeeArr Jun 8 '10 at 0:46
    
but when the comparisons are only between the points and the numeric long & lat values there's no speed change. There's no join possible there, no? –  Dan Donaldson Jun 8 '10 at 0:48
    
@user315975: I dunno your data, but don't include tables if they serve absolutely no purpose. Still need to know how POINTS and CONTACTS relate... –  OMG Ponies Jun 8 '10 at 0:50
    
@user315975: It'll probably be more worthwhile to analyze the performance of a query that makes sense. –  Thanatos Jun 8 '10 at 1:19
    
Yep! Whats happening is he is getting all the possuble permutations of the points, areas and contacts rows, which are then being sorted to remove the duplicates as directed by the "DISTINCT" clause. –  James Anderson Jun 8 '10 at 2:09
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You're joining three tables, p, a, and c, but you aren't specifying how to attach them together. What you're getting is a full Cartesian join between all of the rows in all of the tables that match the criteria, then everything in areas.

You probably want to attach something in points to something in areas. And something in contacts with ... well, I don't know what your schema looks like.

Try sticking an "EXPLAIN" at the beginning for information on what's happening.

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Indeed. You might only have 2000 records in points, but if you have 2000 in areas and 2000 in contacts as well, you're generating 2000 * 2000 * 2000 = 8 billion rows, then sorting them back into distinct. –  Cowan Jun 8 '10 at 5:14
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Probably you are missing the joins. Joining the table would be something like this.

SELECT DISTINCT p.* 
  FROM points p
  JOIN areas a p ON  a.FkPoint = p.id
  JOIN contacts c ON c.FkArea = a.id
 WHERE (    p.latitude > 43.6511659465 
        AND p.latitude < 43.6711659465 
        AND p.longitude > -79.4677941889 
        AND p.longitude < -79.4477941889) 
   AND p.resource_type = 'Contact' 
   AND c.user_id = 6

For better indexes on coordinates use Quadtree or R-Tree index implementation.

If you intentionally did not miss the joins, try a subquery like this.

select DISTINCT thePoints.*
(   
    SELECT DISTINCT p.* 
    FROM points p
    WHERE (     p.latitude > 43.6511659465 
            AND p.latitude < 43.6711659465 
            AND p.longitude > -79.4677941889 
            AND p.longitude < -79.4477941889) 
    AND p.resource_type = 'Contact' 
) as thePoints
, areas, contacts
WHERE  c.user_id = 6
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You need a rtree index and use the @ operator, normal index won't work.

R-Tree http://www.postgresql.org/docs/8.1/static/indexes-types.html

@ operator http://www.postgresql.org/docs/8.1/static/functions-geometry.html

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R-tree indices don't exist 8.3+. –  rfusca Jun 8 '10 at 2:42
    
Well, GiST indices (which implement R-trees for the geom types, I think) –  araqnid Jun 8 '10 at 9:48
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