Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In PHP, what do you mean by function overloading and function overriding. and what is the difference between both of them? couldn't figure out what is the difference between them.

share|improve this question
add comment

5 Answers

up vote 87 down vote accepted

In Object Oriented Programming (OOP), Overloading is defining functions that have similar signatures, yet have different parameters. Overriding is only pertinent to derived classes, where the parent class has defined a method and the derived class wishes to override that method.

In PHP, you can only overload methods using the magic method __call.

An example of overriding:

<?php

class Foo {
   function myFoo() {
      return "Foo";
   }
}

class Bar extends Foo {
   function myFoo() {
      return "Bar";
   }
}

$foo = new Foo;
$bar = new Bar;
echo($foo->myFoo()); //"Foo"
echo($bar->myFoo()); //"Bar"
?>
share|improve this answer
11  
PHP doesn't support overloading, though. –  Sasha Chedygov Jun 8 '10 at 4:40
12  
Yes it does, using __call. –  Jacob Relkin Jun 8 '10 at 4:47
51  
That's called monkey patching... Supporting via a hack... –  Andrew Moore Jun 8 '10 at 4:52
24  
PHP substitutes overloading via optional parameters. –  b01 Mar 17 '12 at 16:44
2  
Thanks for the idea of optional parameters, It's a really helpful hint –  Fabricio PH Aug 27 '12 at 16:23
show 2 more comments

Function overloading occurs when you define the same function name twice (or more) using different set of parameters. For example:

class Addition {
  function compute($first, $second) {
    return $first+$second;
  }

  function compute($first, $second, $third) {
    return $first+$second+$third;
  }
}

In the example above, the function compute is overloaded with two different parameter signatures. *This is not yet supported in PHP. An alternative is to use optional arguments:

class Addition {
  function compute($first, $second, $third = 0) {
    return $first+$second+$third;
  }
}

Function overriding occurs when you extend a class and rewrite a function which existed in the parent class:

class Substraction extends Addition {
  function compute($first, $second, $third = 0) {
    return $first-$second-$third;
  }
}

For example, compute overrides the behavior set forth in Addition.

share|improve this answer
2  
Except function overloading is not supported in PHP, AFAIK. Also, as an unrelated side note, I'm not sure why you would have a Subtraction class extend the Addition class. :) –  Sasha Chedygov Jun 8 '10 at 4:38
4  
@musicfreak: 12:40 AM local time... Couldn't think of a better example. –  Andrew Moore Jun 8 '10 at 4:40
2  
This is not yet supported in PHP and probably never will, as PHP is weakly-typed language and nothing is going to change in this case. –  Crozin Aug 31 '10 at 0:34
1  
Overloading is not only when you define the same function name twice (or more times) using different set of parameters. Generally, overloading is also when you define the same function name twice (or more times) using the same number of parameters but of different types. Since in PHP there's no variable type declaration (like in Java) this generalization does not matter. I'm just mentioning this for the sake of preciseness what overloading is. –  sbrbot Jan 24 '13 at 13:07
1  
@sbrbot: Set implies both number and types. –  Andrew Moore Jan 24 '13 at 17:45
show 1 more comment

Strictly speaking, there's no difference, since you cannot do either :)

Function overriding could have been done with a PHP extension like APD, but it's deprecated and afaik last version was unusable.

Function overloading in PHP cannot be done due to dynamic typing, ie, in PHP you don't "define" variables to be a particular type. Example:

$a=1;
$a='1';
$a=true;
$a=doSomething();

Each variable is of a different type, yet you can know the type before execution (see the 4th one). As a comparison, other languages use:

int a=1;
String s="1";
bool a=true;
something a=doSomething();

In the last example, you must forcefully set the variable's type (as an example, I used data type "something").


Another "issue" why function overloading is not possible in PHP: PHP has a function called func_get_args(), which returns an array of current arguments, now consider the following code:

function hello($a){
  print_r(func_get_args());
}

function hello($a,$a){
  print_r(func_get_args());
}

hello('a');
hello('a','b');

Considering both functions accept any amount of arguments, which one should the compiler choose?


Finally, I'd like to point out why the above replies are partially wrong; function overloading/overriding is NOT equal to method overloading/overriding.

Where a method is like a function but specific to a class, in which case, PHP does allow overriding in classes, but again no overloading, due to language semantics.

To conclude, languages like Javascript allow overriding (but again, no overloading), however they may also show the difference between overriding a user function and a method:

/// Function Overriding ///

function a(){
   alert('a');
}
a=function(){
   alert('b');
}

a(); // shows popup with 'b'


/// Method Overriding ///

var a={
  "a":function(){
    alert('a');
  }
}
a.a=function(){
   alert('b');
}

a.a(); // shows popup with 'b'
share|improve this answer
2  
PHP 5.x.x does not support overloading this is why PHP is not fully OOP. –  PHP Ferrari Dec 27 '10 at 18:19
16  
It isn't that PHP does not support overloading, it is that it can't make sense. The issue is due to PHP using dynamic types. In fact, Javascript doesn't support overloading either, and it is still OOP. The "PHP is not fully OOP" fud only exists because some people decided to use a check-list to judge what's OOP or not. –  Christian Dec 28 '10 at 12:15
    
Very Very Elaborately Explained... Thanx... –  OM The Eternity May 17 '11 at 11:48
add comment

Although overloading paradigm is not fully supported by PHP the same (or very similar) effect can be achieved with default parameter(s) (as somebody mentioned before).

If you define your function like this:

function f($p=0)
{
  if($p)
  {
    //implement functionality #1 here
  }
  else
  {
    //implement functionality #2 here
  }
}

When you call this function like:

f();

you'll get one functionality (#1), but if you call it with parameter like:

f(1);

you'll get another functionality (#2). That's the effect of overloading - different functionality depending on function's input parameter(s).

I know, somebody will ask now what functionality one will get if he/she calls this function as f(0).

share|improve this answer
add comment

PHP 5.x.x does not support overloading this is why PHP is not fully OOP.

share|improve this answer
13  
I don't know where you got the idea that overloading a requirement for Object Oriented Programming. –  drewish Sep 2 '11 at 21:43
6  
@drewish because parametric polymorphism is one of the most important features of OOP? –  Davor May 16 '12 at 17:29
    
He copy pasted from previous answer comments .. –  Sahal May 30 '13 at 3:25
    
@drewish if you count polymorphism as one of the main stagnation of OOP. Then overloading ostensibly is out there for the compilation. However, method overloading is the compile time polymorphism and also known as static polymorphism. –  sabujarefin Mar 6 at 13:07
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.