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When I call this function, everything works, as long as I don't try to recursively call the function again. In other words if I uncomment the line:

GetChilds rsData("AcctID"), intLevel + 1 

Then the function breaks.

<%
    Function GetChilds(ParentID, intLevel)
        Set rsData= Server.CreateObject("ADODB.Recordset")
        sSQL = "SELECT AcctID, ParentID FROM Accounts WHERE ParentID='" & ParentID &"'"
        rsData.Open sSQL, conDB, adOpenKeyset, adLockOptimistic
        If IsRSEmpty(rsData) Then
            Response.Write("Empty")
        Else
            Do Until rsData.EOF
                Response.Write rsData("AcctID") & "<br />"
                'GetChilds rsData("AcctID"), intLevel + 1 
                rsData.MoveNext
            Loop
        End If
        rsData.close: set rsData = nothing
    End Function

    Call GetChilds(1,0)
%>

*Edited after feedback

Thanks everyone,

Other than the usual error:

Error Type: (0x80020009) Exception occurred.

I wasn't sure what was causing the problems. I understand that is probably due to a couple of factors.

  1. Not closing the connection and attempting to re-open the same connection.
  2. To many concurrent connections to the database.

The database content is as follows:

AcctID | ParentID
1        Null
2        1
3        1
4        2
5        2
6        3
7        4

The idea is so that I can have a Master Account with Child Accounts, and those Child Accounts can have Child Accounts of their Own. Eventually there will be Another Master Account with a ParentID of Null that will have childs of its own. With that in mind, am I going about this the correct way?

Thanks for the quick responses.


Thanks everyone,

Other than the usual error:

Error Type: (0x80020009) Exception occurred.

I wasn't sure what was causing the problems. I understand that is probably due to a couple of factors.

  1. Not closing the connection and attempting to re-open the same connection.
  2. To many concurrent connections to the database.

The database content is as follows:

AcctID | ParentID
1        Null
2        1
3        1
4        2
5        2
6        3
7        4

The idea is so that I can have a Master Account with Child Accounts, and those Child Accounts can have Child Accounts of their Own. Eventually there will be Another Master Account with a ParentID of Null that will have childs of its own. With that in mind, am I going about this the correct way?

Thanks for the quick responses.

share|improve this question
    
Are you getting an error message? –  Erik Forbes Nov 18 '08 at 19:48
    
Is function stuck or returns error ? Have you checked your data for loops ? –  Dmitry Khalatov Nov 18 '08 at 19:57

10 Answers 10

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Look like it fails because your connection is still busy serving the RecordSet from the previous call.

One option is to use a fresh connection for each call. The danger there is that you'll quickly run out of connections if you recurse too many times.

Another option is to read the contents of each RecordSet into a disconnected collection: (Dictionary, Array, etc) so you can close the connection right away. Then iterate over the disconnected collection.

If you're using SQL Server 2005 or later there's an even better option. You can use a CTE (common table expression) to write a recursive sql query. Then you can move everything to the database and you only need to execute one query.

Some other notes:
ID fields are normally ints, so you shouldn't encase them in ' characters in the sql string.

Finally, this code is probably okay because I doubt the user is allowed to input an id number directly. However, the dynamic sql technique used is very dangerous and should generally be avoided. Use query parameters instead to prevent sql injection.

I'm not too worried about not using intLevel for anything. Looking at the code this is obviously an early version, and intLevel can be used later to determine something like indentation or the class name used when styling an element.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Joel, This was very helpfull. I will research CTE later on to move this function into SQL. For now I have done a quick dirty fix, and stored the childs into an array, and then called the function again with those childs from the array. Thanks for your input it was very helpfull. –  jesusOmar Nov 18 '08 at 21:06
    
w3schools.com/ado/met_rs_getrows.asp. I posted this below, but I wanted you to see it. –  MrChrister Nov 18 '08 at 21:08
    
+1 for parameterized queries; not only are they more secure, but SQL Server can optimize the queries and reuse the same optimization while the query string is unchanged. –  Erik Forbes Nov 21 '08 at 17:26

Running out of SQL Connections?

You are dealing with so many layers there (Response.Write for the client, the ASP for the server, and the database) that its not surprising that there are problems.

Perhaps you can post some details about the error?

share|improve this answer
    
He doesn't create a new connection each time- he's trying to use the same connection with multiple recordsets, which IIRC isn't supported in classic asp. But it's on the right track. –  Joel Coehoorn Nov 18 '08 at 19:57
    
I think ADO supports connection pooling, so he isn't running out of connections. Here is my source 15seconds.com/issue/970531.htm –  MrChrister Nov 18 '08 at 20:07

hard to tell without more description of how it breaks, but you are not using intLevel for anything.

share|improve this answer

How does it break?

My guess is that after a certain number of recursions you're probably getting a Stack Overflow (ironic) because you're not allocating too many RecordSets.

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In each call you open a new connection to the database and you don't close it before opening a new one.

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Not that this is actually a solution to the recursion issue, but it might be better for you to work out an SQL statement that returns all the information in a hierarchical format, rather than making recursive calls to your database.

Come to think of it though, it may be because you have too many concurrent db connections. You continually open, but aren't going to start closing until your pulling out of your recursive loop.

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try declaring the variables as local using a DIM statement within the function definition:

Function GetChilds(ParentID, intLevel)
Dim rsData, sSQL
Set ...

Edit: Ok, I try to be more explicit.

My understanding is that since rsData is not declared by DIM, it is not a local variable, but a global var. Therefore, if you loop through the WHILE statement, you reach the .Eof of the inner-most rsData recordset. You return from the recursive function call, and the next step is again a rsData.MoveNext, which fails.

Please correct me if rsData is indeed local.

share|improve this answer

If you need recursion such as this I would personally put the recursion into a stored procedure and handle that processing on the database side in order to avoid opening multiple connections. If you are using mssql2005 look into something called Common Table Expressions (CTE), they make recursion easy. There are other ways to implement recursion with other RDBMS's.

share|improve this answer

Based on the sugestions I will atempt to move the query into a CTE (common table expression) when I find a good tutorial on how to do that. For now and as a quick and dirty fix, I have changed the code as follows:

Function GetChilds(ParentID, intLevel)
    	'Open my Database Connection and Query the current Parent ID
    	Set rsData= Server.CreateObject("ADODB.Recordset")
    	sSQL = "SELECT AcctID, ParentID FROM Accounts WHERE ParentID='" & ParentID &"'"
    	rsData.Open sSQL, conDB, adOpenKeyset, adLockOptimistic
    	'If the Record Set is not empty continue
    	If Not IsRSEmpty(rsData) Then
    		Dim myAccts()
    		ReDim myAccts(rsData.RecordCount)
    		Dim i
    		i = 0
    		Do Until rsData.EOF
    			Response.Write "Account ID: " & rsData("AcctID") & " ParentID: " & rsData("ParentID") & "<br />"
    			'Add the Childs of the current Parent ID to an array.
    			myAccts(i) = rsData("AcctID")
    			i = i + 1
    			rsData.MoveNext
    		Loop
    		'Close the SQL connection and get it ready for reopen. (I know not the best way but hey I am just learning this stuff)
    		rsData.close: set rsData = nothing
    		'For each Child found in the previous query, now lets get their childs.
    		For i = 0 To UBound(myAccts)
    			Call GetChilds(myAccts(i), intLevel + 1)
    		Next
    	End If
    End Function

    Call GetChilds(1,0)
share|improve this answer
    
Please use get rows. w3schools.com/ado/met_rs_getrows.asp It will dump the whole record set into an array and you don't have to do a loop connected to the database –  MrChrister Nov 18 '08 at 21:07
    
One other note. Make sure you don't get stuck in an infinite loop. ie. Make sure that a child isn't the parent of one of its parents. If that case is possible in your business logic, then make sure to account for it in your code (keep track of processed nodes and don't reprocess them). –  Aaron Palmer Nov 18 '08 at 21:15

I have working code with the same scenario.

I use a clientside cursor

...
rsData.CursorLocation = adUseClient
rsData.Open sSQL, conDB, adOpenKeyset, adLockOptimistic
rsData.ActiveConnectcion = Nothing
...

as pointed out in other responses, this is not very efficient, I use it only in an admin interface where the code is called infrequently and speed is not as critical.

I would not use such a recursive process in a regular web page. Either rework the code to get all data in one call from the database, or make the call once and save it to a local array and save the array in an application variable.

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