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what is the difference between

try { ... }
catch{ throw } 

and

try{ ... }
catch(Exception e) {throw new Exception(e.message) } 

Regardless that the second shows a message ?

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16  
The second snippet is one of the most evil (but innocuous) lines of code I've ever seen. –  SLaks Jun 8 '10 at 16:40
    

9 Answers 9

up vote 77 down vote accepted

throw; rethrows the original exception and preserves its original stack trace.

throw ex; throws the original exception but resets the stack trace, destroying all stack trace information until your catch block.


NEVER write throw ex;


throw new Exception(ex.Message); is even worse. It creates a brand new Exception instance, losing the original stack trace of the exception, as well as its type. (eg, IOException).
In addition, some exceptions hold additional information (eg, ArgumentException.ParamName).
throw new Exception(ex.Message); will destroy this information too.

In certain cases, you may want to wrap all exceptions in a custom exception object, so that you can provide additional information about what the code was doing when the exception was thrown.

To do this, define a new class that inherits Exception, add all four exception constructors, and optionally an additional constructor that takes an InnerException as well as additional information, and throw your new exception class, passing ex as the InnerException parameter. By passing the original InnerException, you preserve all of the original exception's properties, including the stack trace.

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5  
"throw new Exception(ex); is even worse.": I disagree on this one. Sometimes you want to change the type of an exception, and then keeping the original exception as inner exception is the best you can do. Though it should be throw new MyCustomException(myMessage, ex); of course. –  0xA3 Jun 8 '10 at 16:36
4  
@0xA3: I meant ex.Message, which is worse. –  SLaks Jun 8 '10 at 16:47
3  
In addition to implementing the standard constructors, one should also make custom exceptions [Serializable()]. –  0xA3 Jun 8 '10 at 16:56
    
Yes; I forgot to mention that. –  SLaks Jun 8 '10 at 16:56
4  
Yo dawg, we herd you like exceptions so we put an exception in yo’ exception so you can catch while you catch. –  Darth Continent Oct 14 '11 at 13:48

The first preserves the original stacktrace:

try { ... }
catch
{
    // Do something.
    throw;
}

The second allows you to change the type of the exception and/or the message and other data:

try { ... } catch (Exception e)
{
    throw new BarException("Something broke!");
}

There's also a third way where you pass an inner exception:

try { ... }
catch (FooException e) {
    throw new BarException("foo", e);
} 

I'd recommend using:

  • the first if you want to do some cleanup in error situation without destroying information or adding information about the error.
  • the third if you want to add more information about the error.
  • the second if you want to hide information (from untrusted users).
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throw re-throws the caught exception, retaining the stack trace, while throw new Exception loses some of the details of the caught exception.

You would normally use throw by itself to log an exception without fully handling it at that point.

BlackWasp has a good article sufficiently titled Throwing Exceptions in C#.

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+1 for the link. –  egrunin Jun 8 '10 at 17:22

throw is for rethrowing a caught exception. This can be useful if you want to do something with the exception before passing it up the call chain.

Using throw without any arguments preserves the call stack for debugging purposes.

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Throwing a new Exception blows away the current stack trace.

throw; will retain the original stack trace and is almost always more useful. The exception to that rule is when you want to wrap the Exception in a custom Exception of your own. You should then do:

catch(Exception e)
{
    throw new CustomException(customMessage, e);
}
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If you want you can throw a new Exception, with the original one set as an inner exception.

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Your second example will reset the exception's stack trace. The first most accurately preserves the origins of the exception. Also you've unwrapped the original type which is key in knowing what actually went wrong... If the second is required for functionality - e.g. To add extended info or re-wrap with special type such as a custom 'HandleableException' then just be sure that the InnerException property is set too!

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Wow. When I started writing, there were no answers yet and now i' number 6... –  Reddog Jun 8 '10 at 16:39
    
Yeah, this is one of those questions where you have to write fast. ;) –  Robert Harvey Jun 8 '10 at 16:44

Most important difference is that second expression erases type of exception. And exception type plays vital role in catching exceptions:

public void MyMethod ()
{
    // both can throw IOException
    try { foo(); } catch { throw; }
    try { bar(); } catch(E) {throw new Exception(E.message); }
}

(...)

try {
    MyMethod ();
} catch (IOException ex) {
    Console.WriteLine ("Error with I/O"); // [1]
} catch (Exception ex) {
    Console.WriteLine ("Other error");    // [2]
}

If foo() throws IOException, [1] catch block will catch exception. But when bar() throws IOException, it will be converted to plain Exception ant won't be caught by [1] catch block.

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One other point that I didn't see anyone make:

If you don't do anything in your catch {} block, having a try...catch is pointless. I see this all the time:

try 
{
  //Code here
}
catch
{
    throw;
}

Or worse:

try 
{
  //Code here
}
catch(Exception ex)
{
    throw ex;
}

Worst yet:

try 
{
  //Code here
}
catch(Exception ex)
{
    throw new System.Exception(ex.Message);
}
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