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I need some help with a query.

i want to select from a table, some values, but the values depend on the value of an other cell. after i select i need to sort them.

Can i use ELECT column FROM table WHERE one=two ORDER BY ...?

thanks, Sebastian

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4  
Have you tried? – Felix Kling Jun 8 '10 at 17:29
    
yes i tried but i get an error to check manually the sql syntax. – sebastian Jun 8 '10 at 17:31
2  
Can you show your query? Then probably something else is wrong. – Felix Kling Jun 8 '10 at 17:33
    
You cannot use SELECT * FROM * WHERE ... like you wrote in your title, but you can write SELECT * FROM table1 WHERE ... as in your question. Which one are you using? – Mark Byers Jun 8 '10 at 17:42
up vote 3 down vote accepted

Yes you can, as long as you spell SELECT correctly.

Here is an example you can copy and paste into your MySQL Query Browser to see a query of this type in action:

CREATE TABLE table1 (
    id INT NOT NULL,
    name1 VARCHAR(100) NOT NULL,
    name2 VARCHAR(100) NOT NULL,
    sortorder INT NOT NULL
);

INSERT INTO table1 (id, name1, name2, sortorder) VALUES
(1, 'Foo', 'Foo', 4),
(2, 'Boo', 'Unknown', 2),
(3, 'Bar', 'Bar', 3),
(4, 'Baz', 'Baz', 1);

SELECT id
FROM table1
WHERE name1 = name2
ORDER BY sortorder;

Result:

4
3
1
share|improve this answer

Maybe some working examples will help:

This returns over 8100 records from one of my databases:

SELECT * FROM fax_logs WHERE fee = service_charge

This returns over 2700 records from my data:

SELECT * FROM fax_logs WHERE fee = service_charge + 5

This returns over 6900 records:

SELECT * FROM fax_logs WHERE fee = service_charge + copies

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I might misunderstood your question, but I think you are trying to compare values of the first and second column. In Mysql, you can refer columns by number, not by name, only inside ORDER BY clause: SELECT * FROM table ORDER BY 1 (order by the first column). You cannot use column index in WHERE.

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