Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have got a template class as follows:

class MyClass<T>
{
    T field;
    public void myMethod()
    {
       field = new T(); // gives compiler error
    }
}

How do I create a new instance of T in my class?

share|improve this question

5 Answers 5

up vote 17 down vote accepted

You need to provide a Class object (or a constructor) to your object, and use reflection. After type erasure, all that is known about T is that it is some subclass of Object.

class MyClass<T> {

  private final Constructor<? extends T> ctor;

  private T field;

  MyClass(Class<? extends T> impl) {
    this.ctor = impl.getConstructor();
  }

  public void myMethod() throws Exception
  {
    field = ctor.newInstance();
  }

}
share|improve this answer

This may be more heavyweight than what you're looking for, but it will also work. Note that if you take this approach, it would make more sense to inject the factory into MyClass when it is constructed instead of passing it into your method each time it is called.

interface MyFactory<T> 
{
    T newObject();
}

class MyClass<T> 
{
    T field;
    public void myMethod(MyFactory<T> factory)
    {
       field = factory.newObject()
    }
}

share|improve this answer
    
Good, non-reflective approach; reflection isn't always an option. myMethod should be able to accept a MyFactory<? extends T>, right? –  erickson Nov 19 '08 at 0:20
    
Good call - you'll want to put a bounded wildcard on the factory to allow objects of type T and subclasses of T to be created in myMethod(). –  Dan Hodge Nov 20 '08 at 2:49

EDIT: Sorry. I overlooked that you are using Java. The code below works in C#.


Use the new() constraint.

Example:

class Test<T> where T : new()
{ 
  T obj; 

  public Test()
  { 
    obj = new T(); // create a T object 
  } 
}
share|improve this answer

Another non-reflective approach is to use a hybrid Builder / Abstract Factory pattern.

In Effective Java, Joshua Bloch goes over the Builder pattern in detail, and advocates a generic Builder interface:

public interface Builder<T> {
  public T build();
}

Concrete builders can implement this interface, and outside classes can use the concrete builder to configure the Builder as required. The builder can be passed to MyClass as a Builder<T>.

Using this pattern, you can get new instances of T, even if T has constructor parameters or requires additional configuration. Of course, you'll need some way to pass the Builder into MyClass. If you can't pass anything into MyClass, then Builder and Abstract Factory are out.

share|improve this answer

If you're willing to subclass you can avoid erasure as well, check out http://www.artima.com/weblogs/viewpost.jsp?thread=208860

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.