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When I am saving a file to the filesystem, I need to store it in chronological order (only three level deep). Year -> Month -> Day -> then store file. (2010 -> June -> 01-06-2010 -> file1.txt. If folders are already in File System then don't create them just save the file.

Whats the best approach?

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3  
Best approach to what? Saving the file? Creating the hierarchy? Naming conventions? –  Oded Jun 8 '10 at 18:43
    
@Oded. Best approach to create hierarchy –  Jango Jun 8 '10 at 18:49
2  
You seem to have already decided on Year -> Month -> Day, so what exactly is the issue? –  Oded Jun 8 '10 at 18:51

4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Probably not the best, but a quick one.. Run with c:\temp, and get C:\temp\2010\juni\08-06-2010. Locale dependent month name btw..

    public static DirectoryInfo GetCreateMyFolder(string baseFolder)
    {
        var now = DateTime.Now;
        var yearName = now.ToString("yyyy");
        var monthName = now.ToString("MMMM");
        var dayName = now.ToString("dd-MM-yyyy");

        var folder = Path.Combine(baseFolder,
                       Path.Combine(yearName,
                         Path.Combine(monthName,
                           dayName)));

        return Directory.CreateDirectory(folder);
    }
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3  
The Directory.Exists() test is unnecessary - CreateDirectory does this anyway. –  Jason Williams Jun 8 '10 at 18:58
    
Your right. Also, CreateDirectory returns the newly created DirectoryInfo –  simendsjo Jun 8 '10 at 19:55
DateTime d = DateTime.Now;
String s = Path.Combine(d.Year.ToString(), d.ToString("MMMM"), d.ToString("dd-MM-yyyy"), "file1.txt");
if (!Directory.Exists(s)) Directory.CreateDirectory(s);

For different date formats, this is a good resource: http://blog.stevex.net/string-formatting-in-csharp/

Obviously, you should combine this path to the main path you will be saving the files in (such as: String s2 = Path.Combine("C:\\Test", s);).

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1  
IIRC, Directory.CreateDirectory(String); can only create a folder one level deep. –  Nate Jun 8 '10 at 18:53
    
@Nate: CreateDirectory will ensure the whole path exists. It also does nothing if the directory already exists, so the Directory.Exists() test is unnecessary. –  Jason Williams Jun 8 '10 at 18:56
    
@Nate Actually, Directory.CreateDirectory will create each directory in the path if it doesn't exist. Read the remark after the first table msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/… –  Waleed Al-Balooshi Jun 8 '10 at 18:57
    
I think what Nate means is that Path.Combine accepts two string parameters only. –  RedFilter Jun 8 '10 at 19:06
1  
Those overloads are (finally!) introduced in .net 4.0. Up to 3.5 you are stuck with the Path.Combine(Path.Combine(Path.Combine ... msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.io.path.combine.aspx –  SWeko Jun 8 '10 at 19:20
string basePath = @"c:\temp";
var myDate = DateTime.Now;
DirectoryInfo di = Directory.CreateDirectory(Path.Combine(basePath, myDate.Year.ToString()));
di = Directory.CreateDirectory(Path.Combine(di.FullName, myDate.ToString("MMMM")));
di = Directory.CreateDirectory(Path.Combine(di.FullName, myDate.ToString("dd-MM-yyyy")));

You can also do it with one CreateDirectory call, in this fashion:

string basePath = @"c:\temp";
var myDate = DateTime.Now;
Directory.CreateDirectory(Path.Combine(Path.Combine(Path.Combine(basePath, myDate.Year.ToString()), myDate.ToString("MMMM")), myDate.ToString("dd-MM-yyyy")));
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string StartupPath= @"C:\temp\";
string Year = DateTime.Now.Year.ToString(); 
string Month = DateTime.Now.Month.ToString(); 
string Day = DateTime.Now.Day.ToString();
Directory.CreateDirectory(StartupPath + "\\" + Year + "\\" + Month + "\\" + Day);
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