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Hy there,

I'm trying to adapt an existing code to boost::variant. The idea is to use boost::variant for a heterogeneous vector. The problem is that the rest of the code use iterators to access the elements of the vector. Is there a way to use the boost::variant with iterators?

I've tried

 typedef boost::variant<Foo, Bar> Variant;
 std::vector<Variant> bag;
 std::vector<Variant>::iterator it;
 for(it= bag.begin(); it != bag.end(); ++it){

 cout<<(*it)<<endl;
 }

But it didn't work.

EDIT: Thank you for your help! But in my design, I need to get one element from the list and pass it around other parts of the code (and that can be nasty, as I'm using GSL). The idea of using an iterator is that I can pass the iterator to a function, and the function will operate on the return data from that specific element. I can't see how to do that using for_each. I need to do something similar to that:

for(it=list.begin(); it!=list.end();++it) {
  for(it_2=list.begin(); it_2!=list.end();++it_2) {

     if(it->property() != it_2->property()) {

        result = operate(it,it_2);

       }
    }

}

Thanks!

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1 Answer

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Well of course there is. Dereferencing the iterators will naturally yield a boost::variant<...> reference or const-reference.

However it does mean that the rest of code should be variant-aware. And notably use the boost::static_visitor to execute operations on the variants.

EDIT:

Easy!

struct Printer: boost::static_visitor<>
{
  template <class T>
  void operator()(T const& t) const { std::cout << t << std::endl; }
};

std::for_each(bag.begin(), bag.end(), boost::apply_visitor(Printer());

Note how writing a visitor automatically yields a predicate for STL algorithms, miam!

Now, for the issue of the return value:

class WithReturn: boost::static_visitor<>
{
public:
  WithReturn(int& result): mResult(result) {}

  void operator()(Foo const& f) const { mResult += f.suprise(); }
  void operator()(Bar const& b) const { mResult += b.another(); }

private:
  int& mResult;
};


int result;
std::for_each(bag.begin(), bag.end(), boost::apply_visitor(WithReturn(result)));

EDIT 2:

It's easy, but indeed need a bit of coaching :)

First, we remark there are 2 different operations: != and operate

 struct PropertyCompare: boost::static_visitor<bool>
 {
   template <class T, class U>
   bool operator()(T const& lhs, U const& rhs)
   {
     return lhs.property() == rhs.property();
   }
 };

 struct Operate: boost::static_visitor<result_type>
 {
   result_type operator()(Foo const& lhs, Foo const& rhs);
   result_type operator()(Foo const& lhs, Bar const& rhs);
   result_type operator()(Bar const& lhs, Bar const& rhs);
   result_type operator()(Bar const& lhs, Foo const& rhs);
 };

for(it=list.begin(); it!=list.end();++it) {
  for(it_2=list.begin(); it_2!=list.end();++it_2) {

    if( !boost::apply_visitor(PropertyCompare(), *it, *it_2) ) {

      result = boost::apply_visitor(Operate(), *it, *it_2));

    }

  }
}

For each is not that good here, because of this if. It would work if you could somehow factor the if in operate though.

Also note that I pass not iterators but references.

share|improve this answer
    
The boost::static_visitor is good to operate on the elements, but does not work when the class must return some data. I've tried using iterators for boost::ptr_vector<boost::variant<element> >, but something like that didn't work: typedef boost::variant<Foo, Bar> Variant; std::vector<Variant> bag; std::vector<Variant>::iterator it; for(it= bag.begin(); it != bag.end(); ++it){ cout<<(*it)<<endl; } –  Ivan Jun 10 '10 at 22:30
    
Edited the entry to illustrate the use. –  Matthieu M. Jun 11 '10 at 6:34
    
Thank you very much. Still trying to adapt the concept to my existing code withou changing too much. New edit above. –  Ivan Jun 11 '10 at 16:54
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