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I'm doing a couple of .getJSON calls and if any one of them succeeds, I'm trying to set a bool to true so I can then do some other stuff elsewhere on the page. I was trying to use jquery's .data() function, but I don't seem able to set it from inside the .getJSON callback. for example:

$('#citations_button').data('citations', false);

$.getJSON(apaurl, function(data) {
    $('#apacite').html("<td class=\"bibInfoLabel\">APA Citation</td><td class=\"bibInfoData\">"+data+"</td>");
    $('#citations_button').data('citations', true);
}, "html");

// other .getJSONs look like above...

console.log("citations? "+$('#citations_button').data('citations'));

prints false, even when I know the data came through. I thought this would work since .data() uses the cache to store the key/value pair. how can i flag successes?? appreciate any assistance!!

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getJSON is an async call, are you sure it returns before your call call to console.log? –  R0MANARMY Jun 9 '10 at 0:26

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You have to keep in mind the sequence in which your code is actually run. Your code will actually run in the following order:

$('#citations_button').data('citations', false);
$.getJSON(apaurl, ..., "html");
console.log("citations? "+$('#citations_button').data('citations'));

Then, eventually, when the asynchronous request comes back, it will run your callback function:

$('#apacite').html("<td class=\"bibInfoLabel\">APA Citation</td><td class=\"bibInfoData\">"+data+"</td>");
$('#citations_button').data('citations', true);

Sure, you eventually set citations to be true, but not until long after you've already printed its false value out to the console.

If you want to do something only after you've gotten your JSON data, that code absolutely must be in that callback function (or must be called from within that callback function, of course).

If you need to wait for a result from all the calls, you can do something like this:

var expectedResponses = 2;

function gotResponsesFromAllCalls() {
    // Do things you can only do when ALL calls have returned.
};
$.getJSON(url1, function(data) {
    // Do things specific to the return of URL 1
    if (--expectedResponses == 0)
        gotResponsesFromAllCalls(); 
}, "html");

$.getJSON(url2, function(data) {
    // Do things specific to the return of URL 2
    if (--expectedResponses == 0)
        gotResponsesFromAllCalls(); 
}, "html");
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This is very helpful. So is there some other way to achieve my goal? Could I group all my .getJSON calls somehow and then run some code once they've all returned? thanks! –  hackmaster.a Jun 9 '10 at 0:37
    
I've edited to include an example. –  VoteyDisciple Jun 9 '10 at 0:41
    
good idea!! I will try this thank you so much. –  hackmaster.a Jun 9 '10 at 0:44
    
(in my case, i need at least one response so i will set the counter to 1 and as soon as it hits zero i can execute the gotResponses function) –  hackmaster.a Jun 9 '10 at 0:47
    
If you need only one response, there's no need for a counter — just call the same function from each callback. –  VoteyDisciple Jun 9 '10 at 0:58

Put what you describe as 'do some other stuff elsewhere on the page' in a function. Call that function in the $.getJSON() callback

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