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Why is this:

class MyType(type):
    def __init__(cls, name, bases, attrs):
        print 'created', cls
class MyMixin:
    __metaclass__ = MyType
class MyList(list, MyMixin): pass

okay, and works as expected:

created <class '__main__.MyMixin'>
created <class '__main__.MyList'>

But this:

class MyType(type):
    def __init__(cls, name, bases, attrs):
        print 'created', cls
class MyMixin:
    __metaclass__ = MyType
class MyObject(object, MyMixin): pass

Is not okay, and blows up thusly?:

created <class '__main__.MyMixin'>
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "/tmp/junk.py", line 11, in <module>
    class MyObject(object, MyMixin): pass
TypeError: Error when calling the metaclass bases
    Cannot create a consistent method resolution
order (MRO) for bases object, MyMixin
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2 Answers 2

up vote 57 down vote accepted

It's not a custom-metaclass problem (though it's diagnosed at metaclass stage):

>>> class Normal(object): pass
... 
>>> class MyObject(object, Normal): pass
... 
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
TypeError: Error when calling the metaclass bases
    Cannot create a consistent method resolution
order (MRO) for bases object, Normal

and the problem's just the same as this one:

>>> class Derived(Normal): pass
... 
>>> class Ok(Derived, Normal): pass
... 
>>> class Nope(Normal, Derived): pass
... 
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
TypeError: Error when calling the metaclass bases
    Cannot create a consistent method resolution
order (MRO) for bases Normal, Derived

i.e., can't multiply inherit from a base class followed by a derived class -- it's impossible to define a consistent MRO that satisfies the usual MRO constraints/guarantees.

Fortunately, you don't want to do that -- the subclass presumably overrides some method of the base class (that's what normal subclasses do;-), and having the base class "in front" would mean "shadowing the override away".

Putting the base class after the derived one is pretty useless, but at least it's innocuous (and consistent with normal MRO guarantees).

Your first example of course works because MyMixin is not derived from list:

>>> MyMixin.__mro__
(<class '__main__.MyMixin'>, <type 'object'>)

...but it is derived from object (like every modern-style Python class), so the second example cannot work (quite independently from MyMixin having a custom metaclass).

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Here, You are inheriting:

The Parent class and Parent class already inheriting another class, SO there is no need to inherit the class that parent class already inherited.

for example:

class A(object): . . class B(object, A): . . It will throw an error because A is inheriting the class Object and B is inheriting the A so indirectly B is inheriting object so no need to inherit object, . . . . Solution is to just remove the object class from class B ... arguments list ..

Thanks,

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