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How can I get the client IP address using PHP?

I want to keep record of the user who logged into my website through his/her IP address.

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10 Answers 10

Whatever you do, make sure not to trust data sent from the client. $_SERVER['REMOTE_ADDR'] contains the real IP address of the connecting party. That is the most reliable value you can find.

However, they can be behind a proxy server in which case the proxy may have set the $_SERVER['HTTP_X_FORWARDED_FOR'], but this value is easily spoofed. For example, it can be set by someone without a proxy, or the IP can be an internal IP from the LAN behind the proxy.

This means that if you are going to save the $_SERVER['HTTP_X_FORWARDED_FOR'], make sure you also save the $_SERVER['REMOTE_ADDR'] value. E.g. by saving both values in different fields in your database.

If you are going to save the IP to a database as a string, make sure you have space for at least 45 characters. IPv6 is here to stay and those addresses are larger than the older IPv4 addresses.

(Note that IPv6 usually uses 39 characters at most but there is also a special IPv6 notation for IPv4 addresses which in its full form can be up to 45 characters. So if you know what you are doing you can use 39 characters, but if you just want to set and forget it, use 45).

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$_SERVER['REMOTE_ADDR'] may not actually contain real client IP addresses, as it will give you a proxy address for clients connected through a proxy, for example. That may well be what you really want, though, depending what your doing with the IPs. Someone's private RFC1918 address may not do you any good if you're say, trying to see where your traffic is originating from, or remembering what IP the user last connected from, where the public IP of the proxy or NAT gateway might be the more appropriate to store.

There are several HTTP headers like X-Forwarded-For which may or may not be set by various proxies. The problem is that those are merely HTTP headers which can be set by anyone. There's no guarantee about their content. $_SERVER['REMOTE_ADDR'] is the actual physical IP address that the web server received the connection from and that the response will be sent to. Anything else is just arbitrary and voluntary information. There's only one scenario in which you can trust this information: you are controlling the proxy that sets this header. Meaning only if you know 100% where and how the header was set should you heed it for anything of importance.

Having said that, here's some sample code:

if (!empty($_SERVER['HTTP_CLIENT_IP'])) {
    $ip = $_SERVER['HTTP_CLIENT_IP'];
} elseif (!empty($_SERVER['HTTP_X_FORWARDED_FOR'])) {
    $ip = $_SERVER['HTTP_X_FORWARDED_FOR'];
} else {
    $ip = $_SERVER['REMOTE_ADDR'];
}

Editor's note: using this code has security implications. The client can set HTTP header to any arbitrary value it wants.

From: http://roshanbh.com.np/2007/12/getting-real-ip-address-in-php.html

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9  
Actually $_SERVER['REMOTE_ADDR'] is far more reliable as at least it points to an actual IP address. It may be a proxy server, then then at least you can still block the proxy. However HTTP_X_FORWARDED_FOR is just a header that can be easily set by anybody. You should store both, but if making a choice choose REMOTE_ADDR. Oh and HTTP_CLIENT_IP isn't even returned by Apache on my tests. I can't be sure, but I think it's a legacy header. –  Gerry Feb 20 '11 at 14:33
2  
Unfortunately, in working with a myriad of Operating Systems, web-server products, load-balancers, firewalls, NAT, & Source NAT variables, the one thing I can tell you is that there is no guarantee that what you do to collect the actual IP on any particular combination of the above will work on any other particular combination of products. The example I put forth is only an example that tries to accomodate the most common headers that might have an IP in them. Each scenario could easily require a unique solution to collect an IP. –  Tim Kennedy Feb 22 '11 at 16:19
43  
Do NOT use the above code unless you know EXACTLY what it does! I've seen MASSIVE security holes due to this. The client can set the X-Forwarded-For or the Client-IP header to any arbitrary value it wants. Unless you have a trusted reverse proxy, you shouldn't use any of those values. –  Janoszen Jun 25 '13 at 14:37
2  
With regards to Janoszen's comment, one option is PHP's filter_var($_SERVER['REMOTE_ADDR'], FILTER_VALIDATE_IP). –  lost philosopher Jan 27 at 21:28
3  
If you read the whole answer, you would see that that point is already addressed in the answer. The code is meant as an example, only, given that there actually is no 100% reliable way to get a 100% correct "real" client IP address. –  Tim Kennedy Apr 21 at 21:06
echo $_SERVER['REMOTE_ADDR'];

http://php.net/manual/en/reserved.variables.server.php

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1  
Actually i want to know the IP address of the Client who is using my website. Not the server IP addresss where my pages have uploaded or executing.. Please help me. –  Anup Prakash Jun 9 '10 at 5:00
22  
@Anup Prakash This is it – hence the "REMOTE" (from the perspective of the script). –  Artefacto Jun 9 '10 at 5:01
    
I get this when I use your code: ::1 –  SiKni8 Oct 4 '13 at 14:09
21  
Because you're on localhost ;) –  Ussama Dahnin Oct 8 '13 at 8:33
7  
@SiKni8 ::1 is the IPv6 equivalent of 127.0.0.1 –  Camilo Martin Dec 30 '13 at 0:17

It should be contained in the $_SERVER['REMOTE_ADDR'] variable.

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The answer is to use $_SERVER variable. For example, $_SERVER["REMOTE_ADDR"] would return the client's IP address.

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My favourite solution is the way Zend Framwork 2 uses. It also considers the $_SERVER properties HTTP_X_FORWARDED_FOR, HTTP_CLIENT_IP, REMOTE_ADDR but it declares a class for it to set some trusted proxies and it returns one IP address not an array. I think this is the solution that comes closest to it:

class RemoteAddress
{
    /**
     * Whether to use proxy addresses or not.
     *
     * As default this setting is disabled - IP address is mostly needed to increase
     * security. HTTP_* are not reliable since can easily be spoofed. It can be enabled
     * just for more flexibility, but if user uses proxy to connect to trusted services
     * it's his/her own risk, only reliable field for IP address is $_SERVER['REMOTE_ADDR'].
     *
     * @var bool
     */
    protected $useProxy = false;

    /**
     * List of trusted proxy IP addresses
     *
     * @var array
     */
    protected $trustedProxies = array();

    /**
     * HTTP header to introspect for proxies
     *
     * @var string
     */
    protected $proxyHeader = 'HTTP_X_FORWARDED_FOR';

    // [...]

    /**
     * Returns client IP address.
     *
     * @return string IP address.
     */
    public function getIpAddress()
    {
        $ip = $this->getIpAddressFromProxy();
        if ($ip) {
            return $ip;
        }

        // direct IP address
        if (isset($_SERVER['REMOTE_ADDR'])) {
            return $_SERVER['REMOTE_ADDR'];
        }

        return '';
    }

    /**
     * Attempt to get the IP address for a proxied client
     *
     * @see http://tools.ietf.org/html/draft-ietf-appsawg-http-forwarded-10#section-5.2
     * @return false|string
     */
    protected function getIpAddressFromProxy()
    {
        if (!$this->useProxy
            || (isset($_SERVER['REMOTE_ADDR']) && !in_array($_SERVER['REMOTE_ADDR'], $this->trustedProxies))
        ) {
            return false;
        }

        $header = $this->proxyHeader;
        if (!isset($_SERVER[$header]) || empty($_SERVER[$header])) {
            return false;
        }

        // Extract IPs
        $ips = explode(',', $_SERVER[$header]);
        // trim, so we can compare against trusted proxies properly
        $ips = array_map('trim', $ips);
        // remove trusted proxy IPs
        $ips = array_diff($ips, $this->trustedProxies);

        // Any left?
        if (empty($ips)) {
            return false;
        }

        // Since we've removed any known, trusted proxy servers, the right-most
        // address represents the first IP we do not know about -- i.e., we do
        // not know if it is a proxy server, or a client. As such, we treat it
        // as the originating IP.
        // @see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/X-Forwarded-For
        $ip = array_pop($ips);
        return $ip;
    }

    // [...]
}

See the full code here: https://raw.githubusercontent.com/zendframework/zf2/master/library/Zend/Http/PhpEnvironment/RemoteAddress.php

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This is the method that I use, and it validates an IPv4 input:

// Get user IP address
if ( isset($_SERVER['HTTP_CLIENT_IP']) && ! empty($_SERVER['HTTP_CLIENT_IP'])) {
    $ip = $_SERVER['HTTP_CLIENT_IP'];
} elseif ( isset($_SERVER['HTTP_X_FORWARDED_FOR']) && ! empty($_SERVER['HTTP_X_FORWARDED_FOR'])) {
    $ip = $_SERVER['HTTP_X_FORWARDED_FOR'];
} else {
    $ip = (isset($_SERVER['REMOTE_ADDR'])) ? $_SERVER['REMOTE_ADDR'] : '0.0.0.0';
}

$ip = filter_var($ip, FILTER_VALIDATE_IP);
$ip = ($ip === false) ? '0.0.0.0' : $ip;
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7  
Thank you for allowing me to spoof my IP address by simply setting an HTTP header! –  deceze Apr 27 at 6:21
1  
@deceze yes, spoofing IP address isn't difficult and I only capture IP address for logging purposes with the knowledge that it shouldn't be trusted. I am of the belief that using IP addresses as an identifier is useless unless used over extremely short time intervals such as rate limiting login attempts for example. So all I tend to do, is ensure the identified IP address is a valid address to guard against header based sql injection attacks. –  carbontwelve Apr 28 at 13:21

Here is a cleaner code sample of a good way to get the ip of the user.

$ip = $_SERVER['REMOTE_ADDR']?:($_SERVER['HTTP_X_FORWARDED_FOR']?:$_SERVER['HTTP_CLIENT_IP']);
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Always remember to sanitize any input that could have been modified by the user. This is one of those times. –  josh123a123 2 days ago

I like this codesnippet:

function getClientIP() {

    if (isset($_SERVER)) {

        if (isset($_SERVER["HTTP_X_FORWARDED_FOR"]))
            return $_SERVER["HTTP_X_FORWARDED_FOR"];

        if (isset($_SERVER["HTTP_CLIENT_IP"]))
            return $_SERVER["HTTP_CLIENT_IP"];

        return $_SERVER["REMOTE_ADDR"];
    }

    if (getenv('HTTP_X_FORWARDED_FOR'))
        return getenv('HTTP_X_FORWARDED_FOR');

    if (getenv('HTTP_CLIENT_IP'))
        return getenv('HTTP_CLIENT_IP');

    return getenv('REMOTE_ADDR');
}
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1  
i mean what's the point.. doesn't getenv give you the same thing as $_SERVER ? –  Pacerier Oct 2 '11 at 2:23

You should use the filter_input() function for all globals which a visitor can enter/manipulate, like this:

$visitors_ip = filter_input(INPUT_SERVER, 'REMOTE_ADDR');

You can read more about it here: http://www.php.net/manual/en/function.filter-input.php and here: http://www.w3schools.com/php/func_filter_input.asp

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protected by animuson Mar 29 at 17:36

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