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Is there some way to do multi-threading in JavaScript?

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1  
JavaScript does not contain threads, at least in its current form. What exactly are you trying to do? –  Eric Pohl Jan 17 '11 at 22:27

10 Answers 10

up vote 66 down vote accepted

See http://caniuse.com/#search=worker for the most up-to-date support info.

The following was the state of support circa 2009.


The words you want to google for are JavaScript Worker Threads

Apart from from Gears there's nothing available right now, but there's plenty of talk about how to implement this so I guess watch this question as the answer will no doubt change in future.

Here's the relevant documentation for Gears: WorkerPool API

WHATWG has a Draft Recommendation for worker threads: Web Workers

And there's also Mozilla’s DOM Worker Threads


Update: June 2009, current state of browser support for JavaScript threads

Firefox 3.5 has web workers. Some demos of web workers, if you want to see them in action:

The Gears plugin can also be installed in Firefox.

Safari 4, and the WebKit nightlies have worker threads:

Chrome has Gears baked in, so it can do threads, although it requires a confirmation prompt from the user (and it uses a different API to web workers, although it will work in any browser with the Gears plugin installed):

  • Google Gears WorkerPool Demo (not a good example as it runs too fast to test in Chrome and Firefox, although IE runs it slow enough to see it blocking interaction)

IE8 and IE9 can only do threads with the Gears plugin installed

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which browsers support Web Workers? I know Firefox 3.5 does.. and it looks like that feature was pushed back and won't be in Chrome 2. –  Jeff Atwood Jun 26 '09 at 7:52
1  
Although Safari 4 supports web workers it appears that only Firefox supports passing complex objects via postMessage: hacks.mozilla.org/2009/07/working-smarter-not-harder See the last paragraph of that post on real world usage in the Bespin project for links to a shim for that implements the Worker API in terms of Google Gears and which adds the missing features to the worker implementation of Safari 4 and details of how they implemented transparent custom events on top of the postMessage interface. –  Sam Hasler Jul 9 '09 at 15:49
6  
Now IE9 is out, you can update "IE8 can only do threads with the Gears plugin installed" to "IE8 and IE9 can only do threads with the Gears plugin installed" –  BenoitParis Oct 29 '10 at 8:15
    
Why we need threads in javascript? AJAX is not enough? –  inf3rno Sep 2 '12 at 12:01
3  
@SamHasler You may want to revise your answer. Web workers are now supported by all modern desktop browsers. See also caniuse.com/#search=worker –  Rob W Apr 6 '13 at 8:42

There's no true threading in JavaScript. JavaScript being the malleable language that it is, does allow you to emulate some of it. Here is an example I came across the other day.

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What do you mean by "true threading"? Green threads are true threads. –  Wes Jan 15 '13 at 14:50

There is no true multi-threading in Javascript, but you can get asynchronous behavior using setTimeout() and asynchronous AJAX requests.

What exactly are you trying to accomplish?

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With the HTML5 "side-specs" no need to hack javascript anymore with setTimeout(), setInterval(), etc. HTML5 & Friends introduces the javascript Web Workers specification. It is an API for running scripts asynchronously and independently.

Links to the specification and a tutorial.

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You could use Narrative JavaScript, a compiler that will transforms your code into a state machine, effectively allowing you to emulate threading. It does so by adding a "yielding" operator (notated as '->') to the language that allows you to write asynchronous code in a single, linear code block.

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In raw Javascript, the best that you can do is using the few asynchronous calls (xmlhttprequest), but that's not really threading and very limited. Google Gears adds a number of APIs to the browser, some of which can be used for threading support.

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The new v8 engine which should come out today supports it (i think)

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If you can't or don't want to use any AJAX stuff, use an iframe or ten! ;) You can have processes running in iframes in parallel with the master page without worrying about cross browser comparable issues or syntax issues with dot net AJAX etc, and you can call the master page's JavaScript (including the JavaScript that it has imported) from an iframe.

E.g, in a parent iframe, to call egFunction() in the parent document once the iframe content has loaded (that's the asynchronous part)

parent.egFunction();

Dynamically generate the iframes too so the main html code is free from them if you want.

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1  
This description was a bit too brief to my liking. Could you either elaborate on how to do this technique, or post some link to a tutorial showing some code? –  oligofren Jan 24 '13 at 9:20

Refer to this blog for multi-threading in javascript

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Here is just a way to simulate multi-threading in Javascript

Now I am going to create 3 threads which will calculate numbers addition, numbers can be divided with 13 and numbers can be divided with 3 till 10000000000. And these 3 functions are not able to run in same time as what Concurrency means. But I will show you a trick that will make these functions run recursively in the same time : jsFiddle

This code belongs to me.

Body Part

    <div class="div1">
    <input type="button" value="start/stop" onclick="_thread1.control ? _thread1.stop() : _thread1.start();" /><span>Counting summation of numbers till 10000000000</span> = <span id="1">0</span>
</div>
<div class="div2">
    <input type="button" value="start/stop" onclick="_thread2.control ? _thread2.stop() : _thread2.start();" /><span>Counting numbers can be divided with 13 till 10000000000</span> = <span id="2">0</span>
</div>
<div class="div3">
    <input type="button" value="start/stop" onclick="_thread3.control ? _thread3.stop() : _thread3.start();" /><span>Counting numbers can be divided with 3 till 10000000000</span> = <span id="3">0</span>
</div>

Javascript Part

var _thread1 = {//This is my thread as object
    control: false,//this is my control that will be used for start stop
    value: 0, //stores my result
    current: 0, //stores current number
    func: function () {   //this is my func that will run
        if (this.control) {      // checking for control to run
            if (this.current < 10000000000) {
                this.value += this.current;   
                document.getElementById("1").innerHTML = this.value;
                this.current++;
            }
        }
        setTimeout(function () {  // And here is the trick! setTimeout is a king that will help us simulate threading in javascript
            _thread1.func();    //You cannot use this.func() just try to call with your object name
        }, 0);
    },
    start: function () {
        this.control = true;   //start function
    },
    stop: function () {
        this.control = false;    //stop function
    },
    init: function () {
        setTimeout(function () {
            _thread1.func();    // the first call of our thread
        }, 0)
    }
};
var _thread2 = {
    control: false,
    value: 0,
    current: 0,
    func: function () {
        if (this.control) {
            if (this.current % 13 == 0) {
                this.value++;
            }
            this.current++;
            document.getElementById("2").innerHTML = this.value;
        }
        setTimeout(function () {
            _thread2.func();
        }, 0);
    },
    start: function () {
        this.control = true;
    },
    stop: function () {
        this.control = false;
    },
    init: function () {
        setTimeout(function () {
            _thread2.func();
        }, 0)
    }
};
var _thread3 = {
    control: false,
    value: 0,
    current: 0,
    func: function () {
        if (this.control) {
            if (this.current % 3 == 0) {
                this.value++;
            }
            this.current++;
            document.getElementById("3").innerHTML = this.value;
        }
        setTimeout(function () {
            _thread3.func();
        }, 0);
    },
    start: function () {
        this.control = true;
    },
    stop: function () {
        this.control = false;
    },
    init: function () {
        setTimeout(function () {
            _thread3.func();
        }, 0)
    }
};

_thread1.init();
_thread2.init();
_thread3.init();

I hope this way will be helpful.

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