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Here is javascript code (jquery) for adding a row of images:

var tr = $('<tr>');
var td = '<td><img src="myimg.jpg"/></td>';
tr.append(td).append(td).append(td);
$('#mytable tbody tr:eq(0)').before(tr);
tr.empty(); //I really don't need this line...

Technically tr.empty() shouldn't have worked. It actually does the opposite of what I want. What is the techinical term for this behaviour - You've added tr to the DOM, but any jquery function calls to that object still works, where as you'd normally not expect it to work i.e. make changes to the DOM?

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Hmm, in what way does the call to empty() do the opposite of what you want (or expect). tr is a reference to the "object" you just added to the DOM and you can still operate on it. –  mkluwe Jun 9 '10 at 7:08

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I think you have a case of a shared mutable object. You are modifying the object in one place and are surprised to see the changes visible in another place. It's not technically wrong; it's just what happens when you have multiple references to an object that can be modified.

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so if tr.empty() didn't make changes to the DOM, it wud hve been called an immutable object? –  deostroll Jun 9 '10 at 9:47
    
No, if tr.empty() didn't exist, and all other methods and writable properties that alter the state of tr in a visible way did not exist, it would be an immutable object. Search around for "mutable object" and "immutable object" for more info. –  user85509 Jun 9 '10 at 10:42

If there is a particular term for this other than 'object reference', I don't know what it is. I'd suggest that your expectation:

any jquery function calls to that object still works, where as you'd normally not expect it to work i.e. make changes to the DOM?

should be adjusted - for object variables, one should expect that whichever particular reference a change is made through, all references see the updated object.

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