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What is the best way to count the total number of objects created in both stack and heap for different classes. I know that in C++ new and delete operators can be overloaded and hence in the default constructor and destructor the object count can be incremented or decremented as and when the objects get created or destroyed.

Further if i am to extend the same thing for object counting of objects of different classes, then i can create a dummy class and write the object count code in that class and then when i create any new class i can derive it from the Dummy class.

Is there any other optimal solution to the same problem.

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The best way is not to bother - why do you think you need to do this? –  anon Jun 9 '10 at 10:31
    
Basically a duplicate of stackoverflow.com/questions/1926605 –  Björn Pollex Jun 9 '10 at 10:51
    
Do you want to count only objects on stack & heap? Not in globals, function-level statics, temporaries, or exceptions? @Space_cowboy: not really, if you need to exclude certain objects based on their lifetime. –  MSalters Jun 9 '10 at 11:47
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up vote 4 down vote accepted

then i can create a dummy class and write the object count code in that class and then when i create any new class i can derive it from the Dummy class.

Yes, but since each class needs its own count, you have to make a base class template and use the curiously recurring template pattern (CRTP):

template <class Derived>
class InstanceCounter
{
    static int count;

protected:

    InstanceCounter()
    {
        ++count;
    }

    ~InstanceCounter()
    {
        --count;
    }

public:

    static int instance_count()
    {
        return count;
    }
};

template <class Derived>
int InstanceCounter<Derived>::count = 0;

class Test : public InstanceCounter<Test>
{
};

int main()
{
    Test x;
    std::cout << Test::instance_count() << std::endl;
    {
        Test y;
        Test z;
        std::cout << Test::instance_count() << std::endl;
    }
    std::cout << Test::instance_count() << std::endl;
}
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