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I am looking for a LaTeX package that does syntax highlighting on code. For example, right now I use the verbatim block to write code:

\begin{verbatim}
    <html>
       <head>
           <title>Hello</title>
       </head>
       <body>Hello</body>
    </html>
\end{verbatim}

And this works fine to display the code on my document. But, suppose I wanted to highlight the HTML markup the way an IDE would in the output document? Is there a package that could help?

I would like to do the same for various languages such as Java, C#, HTML, CSS and so on.

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3  
I'm not satisfied with lstlisting. It does not highlight XML code at all and screws up when using foreign Unicode characters. JavaScript is not supported, too, as it seems. Can LGrind handle such things? –  webjunkie Feb 4 '09 at 13:51
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6 Answers

up vote 98 down vote accepted

You can use the listings package. It supports many different languages and there are lots of options for customising the output.

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{listings}

\begin{document}
\begin{lstlisting}[language=html]
<html>
    <head>
        <title>Hello</title>
    </head>
    <body>Hello</body>
</html>
\end{lstlisting}
\end{document}
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Excellent...this is exactly what I was looking for. Thanks. –  Vincent Ramdhanie Nov 19 '08 at 0:04
9  
Does this do colors by default? I'm not seeing colored output in my test usage, and I'm not sure if that's an error on my part, or simply not a feature. –  Benson Apr 11 '09 at 0:24
8  
I found an answer here: tjansson.dk/?p=419. You can simply use the lstset command to set all kinds of styles for different properties. –  Benson Apr 11 '09 at 1:40
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After asking a similar question I’ve created another package which uses Pygments, and offers quite a few more options than texments. It’s called minted and is quite stable and usable.

Just to show it off, here’s a code highlighted with minted:

Example code

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This is actually quite a good job. Having to install Pygments does pose a bit of a challenge but I'm sure most persons will be willing to do so. –  Vincent Ramdhanie Jan 24 '10 at 13:58
1  
@Vincent: Unfortunately, installing Pygments on Windows is quite a bit more complicated at the moment (the user has to adapt the PATH variable and create a cmd script). I’m hoping to convince the Pygments maintainers to ship pygmentize with an .exe wrapper to make this step easier. –  Konrad Rudolph Jan 25 '10 at 12:45
1  
After trying both listings and minted/Pygments I decided minted was much better (more flexible). HOWEVER it will require jumping through a dozen hoops, upgrading to MiKTeX 2.8, installing Python, installing other components and so on. Minted documentation is poor and it doesn't support breaking long lines. But eventually I got it to render Java/XML in Eclipse colours! jevon.org/wiki/Eclipse_Pygments_Style –  jevon May 25 '10 at 0:19
    
@soundasleepful: The minted documentation is continually updated. ;-) I actually find it quite extensive (of course I’m biased) but I’m happy to address any complaints. As it stands, the “requirements” section is admittedly awful. –  Konrad Rudolph May 25 '10 at 9:13
    
It's also extremely easy to define your own Lexers for new languages in Pygments (they're just regular expressions), so if you're working with weird and esoteric academic programming languages, Pygments/minted is definitely the best. –  jevon Jun 16 '10 at 5:11
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I recommend Pygments. It accepts a piece of code in any language and outputs syntax highlighted LaTeX code. It uses fancyvrb and color packages to produce its output. I personally prefer it to the listing package. I think fancyvrb creates much prettier results.

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1  
While I admire the macrology behind listings, I also agree that pygments has the edge: nicer highlighting, easier customisation, some ability to mix syntaxes, and the ability to output to formats other than Latex, such as HTML. –  Charles Stewart May 27 '10 at 17:44
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LGrind does this. It's a mature LaTeX package that's been around since adam was a cowboy and has support for many programming languages.

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I mostly use lstlistings in papers, but for coloured output (for slides) I use pygments instead.

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I would suggest defining your own package based on the following tex code; this gives you complete freedom. http://ubuntuforums.org/archive/index.php/t-331602.html

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Thanks. I will look into this. –  Vincent Ramdhanie Nov 14 '09 at 17:24
    
The link just shows specific settings for syntax highlighting Python code with the 'listings' package... –  las3rjock Nov 14 '09 at 17:29
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