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when I try to overload operator == and != in C#, and override Equal as recommended, I found I have no way to distinguish a normal object and null. For example, I defined a class Complex.

public static bool operator ==(Complex lhs, Complex rhs)
{
    return lhs.Equals(rhs);
}

public static bool operator !=(Complex lhs, Complex rhs)
{
    return !lhs.Equals(rhs);
}

public override bool Equals(object obj)
{
    if (obj is Complex)
    {
        return (((Complex)obj).Real == this.Real &&
                   ((Complex)obj).Imaginary == this.Imaginary);
    }
    else
    {
        return false;
    }
}

But when I want to use

if (temp == null)

When temp is really null, some exception happens. And I can't use == to determine whether the lhs is null, which will cause infinite loop.

What should I do in this situation.

One way I can think of is to us some thing like Class.Equal(object, object) (if it exists) to bypass the == when I do the check.

What is the normal way to solve the problem?

Thank you.

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5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You should consider using the static Equals method in the operator overloads (which will call the instance Equals method):

public static bool operator ==(Complex lhs, Complex rhs)
{
    return Equals(lhs, rhs);
}

public static bool operator !=(Complex lhs, Complex rhs)
{
    return !Equals(lhs, rhs);
}

Note: You may also check for null in the Equals method.

You can also read the Object.Equals Topic on MSDN, which is a great source of samples.

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Thanks, it works, but I'm not sure why. And, why can Object be omitted in Object.Equals()? And I didn't find why this can prevent the null problem in MSDN. (Does it check null first?) –  LLS Jun 9 '10 at 13:21
    
You don't need the Object class prefix because Complex inherit from Object; Complex see the Object's static methods. I don't know the internals of the static Equals method, but it likely check for null before calling the instance Equals method. –  Laurent Etiemble Jun 9 '10 at 13:28
    
If lhs is not null the static Equals calls the instance method Equals on lhs. If lhs is null Equals compares the references of lhs and rhs. –  Jakob Christensen Jun 9 '10 at 13:35
    
Thank you. It seems to be an elegant solution. –  LLS Jun 9 '10 at 13:40

You can use the following at the top of your Equals override:

if (Object.ReferenceEquals(obj, null))
    return false;

The exception you are getting is probably a StackOverflowException because your == operator will cause infinite recursion.

EDIT:

If Complex is a struct you should not have any problems with NullReferenceExceptions. If Complex is a class you can change your implementation of the == and != operator overloads to avoid the exception (Laurent Etiemble already pointed this out in his answer):

public static bool operator ==(Complex lhs, Complex rhs)
{
    return Equals(lhs, rhs);
}

public static bool operator !=(Complex lhs, Complex rhs)
{
    return !Equals(lhs, rhs);
} 
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Actually it's Object reference not set to an instance of an object. It should work, thanks. :) –  LLS Jun 9 '10 at 12:59
    
The exception still exists, since null.Equals() is attempted to be called. –  LLS Jun 9 '10 at 13:02
    
I'd consider making Complex a struct instead of a class. –  Jakob Christensen Jun 9 '10 at 13:19
    
That's true. It just an example. And thanks anyway. (Actually Microsoft has already implemented Complex, so there is no need to create one in real life) –  LLS Jun 9 '10 at 13:39
public static bool operator ==(Complex lhs, Complex rhs)
{
    if (Object.ReferenceEquals(lhs, null))
    {
        return Object.ReferenceEquals(rhs, null);
    }

    return lhs.Equals(rhs);
}

public static bool operator !=(Complex lhs, Complex rhs)
{
    return !(lhs == rhs);
}

Poor man's unit test

Action<Complex, Complex> tester = (left, right) =>
{
    Console.WriteLine(left == right);
    Console.WriteLine(left != right);
    Console.WriteLine(left == null);
    Console.WriteLine(left != null);
    Console.WriteLine("---");
};

tester(new Complex(), new Complex());
tester(null, new Complex());
tester(null, null);
tester(new Complex(), null);
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Thanks a lot. It's easy to understand. –  LLS Jun 9 '10 at 13:40

I think you shoud test for null in the == operator implementation. Otherwise, when lhs is null, you'd call Complex(null).Equals (I don't know for C#, but in Java this would be a Nullpointer Exception)

To test for null, I suggest something like:

if (null == lhs && null == rhs) return true
else if (null == lhs) return false
else return lhs.Equals(rhs);

So Object.Equals will be called for all == comparisons above.

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You get a recursive call to the == operator. –  user159335 Jun 9 '10 at 13:16
    
Ok, interesting. Just being curious, how comes that operator ==(Complex, Complex) is called, when I test for null == lhs? How does the compiler decide that "null" is of type Complex? –  nang Jun 9 '10 at 13:22

There is a better approach then using operators is and cast:

Complex c = obj as Complex;
return (c != null) && (c.Real == this.Real) && (c.Imaginary == this.Imaginary);

Here is a quick test concerning Equals operator override and comparing with null:

class Complex
{
    public override bool Equals(object obj)
    {
        if (obj is Complex)
        {
            return true;
        }
        else
        {
            return false;
        }
    }
}

Debugging doesn't step into operator's body:

var b = (new Complex() == new Complex());
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Thanks, but it seems that c != null will cause infinite loop. –  LLS Jun 9 '10 at 12:52
    
@LLS: Really? Interesting. Not sure that comparing with null will use object comparing operator. But maybe.. –  abatishchev Jun 9 '10 at 13:02
    
@LLS: See my updated post –  abatishchev Jun 9 '10 at 13:17
    
I haven't tested it yet, but it was a caution in the text book. And I did encounter this problem when I tried to recursively call ==. –  LLS Jun 9 '10 at 13:17

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