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As I was writing another switch in Eclipse, I once again came across a rather weird (to me, at least) default indentation, which is applied to 'switch' statements:

switch (i) {
case 1:
    ...
case n:
    ...
}

I tend to prefer another way:

switch (i) {
    case 1:
        ...
    case n:
        ...
}

Which way is more readable and eye-pleasing for you? I'm still not hundred percent determined what's best for me, so I'd like to stick to what's best for other people who would read my code.

BTW, you're free to close this question if this is too subjective. :)

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closed as not constructive by Andy, Radu Murzea, Neolisk, Romain Francois, Boris Treukhov Jan 28 '13 at 20:19

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My Eclipse by default indents it as 2nd way. Maybe a missetting in the code formatter of your Eclipse? –  BalusC Jun 9 '10 at 12:40
    
Visual Studio also by default formats in 2nd way. –  Naveen Jun 9 '10 at 12:46
2  
@BalusC: Only the "Eclipse 2.1 [built-in]" formatter formats it with extra indentation. Both the "Eclipse [built-in]" and "Java Conventions [built-in]" use no indentation for the case statement (just checked this on Eclipse 3.5). –  Chris Lercher Jun 9 '10 at 12:51
    
Almost every switch statement in a C program that I'm currently working on uses the first example here. I instinctively go to indent them, but then I remember it the first format is used in 5,000 other files :( –  SSH This Dec 18 '12 at 16:49
    
This seems way too subjective. –  Andy Jan 28 '13 at 16:51

7 Answers 7

I prefer the second way as well. But it is more important to stay consistent within a particular application and/or within a particular team than it is to indent one way or the other.

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According to the "official" Java Code Conventions, it's the first variant (no additional indentation for case): http://java.sun.com/docs/codeconv/html/CodeConventions.doc6.html#468

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6  
Oracle busted that link. Try oracle.com/technetwork/java/javase/documentation/… –  unhillbilly Jan 3 '13 at 13:30

I tend to indent all control structure bodies a single (4space) tab like so:

switch (i) 
{
    case 1:
        ...
    case n:
        ...
}

I consider the switch to be the outer control structure and the case directives part of the body(even though they are part of the control structure).

I would then further tab indent each case like so:

switch (i) 
{
    case 1:
        do_something();
    case n:
        do_something_else();
}

I find this to be the most readable format for the switch case construct.

As jkohlhepp has mentioned conformity to the code style conventions of the project you are working on is the most important thing, if you are working on a project that has none, it is worth developing some.

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1  
+1 I too place the opening brace on a new line. –  onedaywhen Jun 9 '10 at 13:41
1  
uggg, the open bracket of a block should go on the same line as the block definition. –  Jay Jun 9 '10 at 14:57
    
-1 since you placed the opening brace on a new line (I'm obviously not downvoting your answer for real, but I really hate that), but +1 (for real this time) for how you indent everything else. –  Daniele Salatti Jul 25 '13 at 12:53

The first is the standard switch case indentation.

switch (i) {

case 1:
    .... // Here you can write more code in a row than using the second way
    break;
case n:
    ....
    break;
default:
    ....
    break;
}

Notice the new inserted line between switch (i) and case 1:

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If you prefer the second case, then for consistency you should also indent the else part of an if statement:

if( test )
    do_something( );
    else
        do_something_else( );

Most people don't do this, and the convention is to keep the branches on the same level as the statement, thus Java prefers the first as the case statement's test and code branches are consistent in level than a if/then/else construct.

I've flip-flopped between them as well, but finally ended preferring the first:

switch (i) {
case 1:
    ...
case n:
    ...
}
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I use second way:

switch (i) {
    case 1:
        ...
    case n:
        ...
}
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The first method makes logical sense (to me), however I also prefer the second method. I think most of us are conditioned to expect that code inside braces will be indented.

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