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Building on another SO question, how can one check whether two well-formed XML snippets are semantically equal. All I need is "equal" or not, since I'm using this for unit tests.

In the system I want, these would be equal (note the order of 'start' and 'end'):

<?xml version='1.0' encoding='utf-8' standalone='yes'?>
<Stats start="1275955200" end="1276041599">
</Stats>

# Reordered start and end

<?xml version='1.0' encoding='utf-8' standalone='yes'?>
<Stats end="1276041599" start="1275955200" >
</Stats>

I have lmxl and other tools at my disposal, and a simple function that only allows reordering of attributes would work fine as well!


Working snippet based on IanB's answer:

from formencode.doctest_xml_compare import xml_compare
# have to strip these or fromstring carps
xml1 = """    <?xml version='1.0' encoding='utf-8' standalone='yes'?>
    <Stats start="1275955200" end="1276041599"></Stats>"""
xml2 = """     <?xml version='1.0' encoding='utf-8' standalone='yes'?>
    <Stats end="1276041599" start="1275955200"></Stats>"""
xml3 = """ <?xml version='1.0' encoding='utf-8' standalone='yes'?>
    <Stats start="1275955200"></Stats>"""

from lxml import etree
tree1 = etree.fromstring(xml1.strip())
tree2 = etree.fromstring(xml2.strip())
tree3 = etree.fromstring(xml3.strip())

import sys
reporter = lambda x: sys.stdout.write(x + "\n")

assert xml_compare(tree1,tree2,reporter)
assert xml_compare(tree1,tree3,reporter) is False
share|improve this question
1  
from formencode.doctest_xml_compare import xml_compare – laike9m Jan 4 '15 at 8:59
up vote 15 down vote accepted

You can use formencode.doctest_xml_compare -- the xml_compare function compares two ElementTree or lxml trees.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Ian, I'm glad someone your already had this solved! – Gregg Lind Jun 9 '10 at 17:37
1  
This function is incorrect, if you swap attributes order in xml it will return False. – mnowotka May 29 '14 at 13:59
    
@mnowotka not true, it does compare equal for attributes in different order – Anentropic Feb 6 '15 at 12:44
    
@ian-bicking Great tool! Have you put a license on it, I can't seem to find any info on it. – Plux Sep 28 '15 at 10:25

The order of the elements can be significant in XML, this may be why most other methods suggested will compare unequal if the order is different... even if the elements have same attributes and text content.

But I also wanted an order-insensitive comparison, so I came up with this:

from lxml import etree
import xmltodict  # pip install xmltodict


def normalise_dict(d):
    """
    Recursively convert dict-like object (eg OrderedDict) into plain dict.
    Sorts list values.
    """
    out = {}
    for k, v in dict(d).iteritems():
        if hasattr(v, 'iteritems'):
            out[k] = normalise_dict(v)
        elif isinstance(v, list):
            out[k] = []
            for item in sorted(v):
                if hasattr(item, 'iteritems'):
                    out[k].append(normalise_dict(item))
                else:
                    out[k].append(item)
        else:
            out[k] = v
    return out


def xml_compare(a, b):
    """
    Compares two XML documents (as string or etree)

    Does not care about element order
    """
    if not isinstance(a, basestring):
        a = etree.tostring(a)
    if not isinstance(b, basestring):
        b = etree.tostring(b)
    a = normalise_dict(xmltodict.parse(a))
    b = normalise_dict(xmltodict.parse(b))
    return a == b
share|improve this answer
    
This is definitely the best answer and should be accepted. This is the only answer that actually cares about crucial fact that order of fields in XML doesn't matter. – mnowotka May 29 '14 at 13:58
1  
there are two things to consider: order of attributes really does not matter. however order of elements is significant in XML, this code is for a special case where you don't care the order of elements – Anentropic May 29 '14 at 14:15

I had the same problem: two documents I wanted to compare that had the same attributes but in different orders.

It seems that XML Canonicalization (C14N) in lxml works well for this, but I'm definitely not an XML expert. I'm curious to know if somebody else can point out drawbacks to this approach.

parser = etree.XMLParser(remove_blank_text=True)

xml1 = etree.fromstring(xml_string1, parser)
xml2 = etree.fromstring(xml_string2, parser)

print "xml1 == xml2: " + str(xml1 == xml2)

ppxml1 = etree.tostring(xml1, pretty_print=True)
ppxml2 = etree.tostring(xml2, pretty_print=True)

print "pretty(xml1) == pretty(xml2): " + str(ppxml1 == ppxml2)

xml_string_io1 = StringIO()
xml1.getroottree().write_c14n(xml_string_io1)
cxml1 = xml_string_io1.getvalue()

xml_string_io2 = StringIO()
xml2.getroottree().write_c14n(xml_string_io2)
cxml2 = xml_string_io2.getvalue()

print "canonicalize(xml1) == canonicalize(xml2): " + str(cxml1 == cxml2)

Running this gives me:

$ python test.py 
xml1 == xml2: false
pretty(xml1) == pretty(xml2): false
canonicalize(xml1) == canonicalize(xml2): true
share|improve this answer
    
Had also this approach in mind and am searching for the drawbacks or whether this might really be the canonical way to compare xml documents... (pun intended) – michuelnik Jan 29 '14 at 22:02
    
I have been using this for over a year on a site I run that compares XML documents for version control purposes. It works fairly well but the c14n doesn't control for having the same child elements in a different order, so I sometimes still get spurious results. – mehaase Jan 30 '14 at 0:55
    
Does c14n reorder childs? I would guess no... Do you mean the case where the same childs are present but in different order you would like a "no difference" result but this delivers "difference detected"? In my case order of the childs might be important. ;) – michuelnik Jan 30 '14 at 13:41
    
@michuelnik Correct. C14n doesn't not reorder children. And that leads to false positives in my use case, where I'm not concerned about the order of the children. – mehaase Jan 30 '14 at 15:25

If you take a DOM approach, you can traverse the two trees simultaneously while comparing nodes (node type, text, attributes) as you go.

A recursive solution will be the most elegant - just short-circuit further comparison once a pair of nodes are not "equal" or once you detect a leaf in one tree when it's a branch in another, etc.

share|improve this answer
1  
This is the solution, I was just hoping someone had written one already. – Gregg Lind Jun 11 '10 at 14:25

Here a simple solution, convert XML into dictionaries (with xmltodict) and compare dictionaries together

import json
import xmltodict

class XmlDiff(object):
    def __init__(self, xml1, xml2):
        self.dict1 = json.loads(json.dumps((xmltodict.parse(xml1))))
        self.dict2 = json.loads(json.dumps((xmltodict.parse(xml2))))

    def equal(self):
        return self.dict1 == self.dict2

unit test

import unittest

class XMLDiffTestCase(unittest.TestCase):

    def test_xml_equal(self):
        xml1 = """<?xml version='1.0' encoding='utf-8' standalone='yes'?>
        <Stats start="1275955200" end="1276041599">
        </Stats>"""
        xml2 = """<?xml version='1.0' encoding='utf-8' standalone='yes'?>
        <Stats end="1276041599" start="1275955200" >
        </Stats>"""
        self.assertTrue(XmlDiff(xml1, xml2).equal())

    def test_xml_not_equal(self):
        xml1 = """<?xml version='1.0' encoding='utf-8' standalone='yes'?>
        <Stats start="1275955200">
        </Stats>"""
        xml2 = """<?xml version='1.0' encoding='utf-8' standalone='yes'?>
        <Stats end="1276041599" start="1275955200" >
        </Stats>"""
        self.assertFalse(XmlDiff(xml1, xml2).equal())

or in simple python method :

import json
import xmltodict

def xml_equal(a, b):
    """
    Compares two XML documents (as string or etree)

    Does not care about element order
    """
    return json.loads(json.dumps((xmltodict.parse(a)))) == json.loads(json.dumps((xmltodict.parse(b))))
share|improve this answer

Thinking about this problem, I came up with the following solution that renders XML elements comparable and sortable:

import xml.etree.ElementTree as ET
def cmpElement(x, y):
    # compare type
    r = cmp(type(x), type(y))
    if r: return r 
    # compare tag
    r = cmp(x.tag, y.tag)
    if r: return r
    # compare tag attributes
    r = cmp(x.attrib, y.attrib)
    if r: return r
    # compare stripped text content
    xtext = (x.text and x.text.strip()) or None
    ytext = (y.text and y.text.strip()) or None
    r = cmp(xtext, ytext)
    if r: return r
    # compare sorted children
    if len(x) or len(y):
        return cmp(sorted(x.getchildren()), sorted(y.getchildren()))
    return 0

ET._ElementInterface.__lt__ = lambda self, other: cmpElement(self, other) == -1
ET._ElementInterface.__gt__ = lambda self, other: cmpElement(self, other) == 1
ET._ElementInterface.__le__ = lambda self, other: cmpElement(self, other) <= 0
ET._ElementInterface.__ge__ = lambda self, other: cmpElement(self, other) >= 0
ET._ElementInterface.__eq__ = lambda self, other: cmpElement(self, other) == 0
ET._ElementInterface.__ne__ = lambda self, other: cmpElement(self, other) != 0
share|improve this answer

Adapting Anentropic's great answer to Python 3 (basically, change iteritems() to items(), and basestring to string):

from lxml import etree
import xmltodict  # pip install xmltodict

def normalise_dict(d):
    """
    Recursively convert dict-like object (eg OrderedDict) into plain dict.
    Sorts list values.
    """
    out = {}
    for k, v in dict(d).items():
        if hasattr(v, 'iteritems'):
            out[k] = normalise_dict(v)
        elif isinstance(v, list):
            out[k] = []
            for item in sorted(v):
                if hasattr(item, 'iteritems'):
                    out[k].append(normalise_dict(item))
                else:
                    out[k].append(item)
        else:
            out[k] = v
    return out


def xml_compare(a, b):
    """
    Compares two XML documents (as string or etree)

    Does not care about element order
    """
    if not isinstance(a, str):
        a = etree.tostring(a)
    if not isinstance(b, str):
        b = etree.tostring(b)
    a = normalise_dict(xmltodict.parse(a))
    b = normalise_dict(xmltodict.parse(b))
    return a == b
share|improve this answer
    
You can use dict_constructor=dict option for xmltodict: xmltodict.parse(a, dict_constructor=dict) , so you should not need to use normalise_dict function. – inoks Jun 11 at 19:16

Since the order of attributes is not significant in XML, you want to ignore differences due to different attribute orderings and XML canonicalization (C14N) deterministically orders attributes, you can that method for testing equality:

xml1 = b'''    <?xml version='1.0' encoding='utf-8' standalone='yes'?>
    <Stats start="1275955200" end="1276041599"></Stats>'''
xml2 = b'''     <?xml version='1.0' encoding='utf-8' standalone='yes'?>
    <Stats end="1276041599" start="1275955200"></Stats>'''
xml3 = b''' <?xml version='1.0' encoding='utf-8' standalone='yes'?>
    <Stats start="1275955200"></Stats>'''

import lxml.etree

tree1 = lxml.etree.fromstring(xml1.strip())
tree2 = lxml.etree.fromstring(xml2.strip())
tree3 = lxml.etree.fromstring(xml3.strip())

import io

b1 = io.BytesIO()
b2 = io.BytesIO()
b3 = io.BytesIO()

tree1.getroottree().write_c14n(b1)
tree2.getroottree().write_c14n(b2)
tree3.getroottree().write_c14n(b3)

assert b1.getvalue() == b2.getvalue()
assert b1.getvalue() != b3.getvalue()

Note that this example assumes Python 3. With Python 3, the use of b'''...''' strings and io.BytesIO is mandatory, while with Python 2 this method also works with normal strings and io.StringIO.

share|improve this answer

SimpleTAL uses a custom xml.sax handler to compare xml-documents https://github.com/janbrohl/SimpleTAL/blob/python2/tests/TALTests/XMLTests/TALAttributeTestCases.py#L47-L112 (the results for getXMLChecksum are compared) but I prefer generating a list instead of a md5-hash

share|improve this answer

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