Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Possible Duplicate:
Nullable types and the ternary operator. Why won’t this work?

This is my code which works

public decimal? Get()
{
    var res = ...
    return res.Count() > 0 ? res.First() : (decimal?) null;
}

and this one doesn't work

public decimal? Get()
{
    var res = ...
    return res.Count() > 0 ? res.First() : null;
}

giving the compiler error:

Error 1 Type of conditional expression cannot be determined because there is no implicit conversion between 'decimal' and '<null>'

I wonder why? any ideas?

share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by LukeH, abatishchev, Matt Mitchell, Neil N, Anthony Pegram Jun 9 '10 at 16:51

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

1  
Duplicate of stackoverflow.com/questions/858080/… –  LukeH Jun 9 '10 at 16:09
1  
...and stackoverflow.com/questions/2450866/… –  LukeH Jun 9 '10 at 16:11
1  
...and stackoverflow.com/questions/75746/… –  LukeH Jun 9 '10 at 16:11
1  
...and stackoverflow.com/questions/2215745/… –  LukeH Jun 9 '10 at 16:12
1  
...and stackoverflow.com/questions/2766932/… –  LukeH Jun 9 '10 at 16:12

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The error is pretty clear. Both the "?" en ":" parts of that conditional operator need to have the same type or must at least be implicitly converted to the same Type. And a lone null doesn't have a good Type.

Maybe you could use .FirstOrDefault(). Depending on the type of your res that would give a null or 0m.

share|improve this answer

This behavior is covered in section 7.13 of the C# language spec.

In short the types of the two expressions in the ternary operator must be * compatible* in order for the compiler to determine the type of the ternary expression. In this case the two types being considered are

  1. decimal
  2. null

The decimal type is a value type and hence null is not convertible to it. The value null has no associated type. This prevents the compiler from determining the type of the expression and leads to a compilation error.

In the first example the second type is decimal?. There is a conversion between decimal and decimal? so the compiler picks decimal? as the type.

share|improve this answer

Off-topic, but...

Using Count is a bit pointless when all you need to know is whether or not the sequence has any elements. Count will loop through all the elements whereas Any will stop as soon as it hits the first element:

public decimal? Get()
{
    var res = ...
    return res.Any() ? res.First() : (decimal?)null;
}

Or maybe this:

public decimal? Get()
{
    var res = ...
    using (var e = res.GetEnumerator())
    {
        return e.MoveNext() ? e.Current : (decimal?)null;
    }
}
share|improve this answer

I'm guessing res is an array of decimals i.e. decimal[]. This would be because you have declared res like this:

var res = { 1.0, 2.0, 3.0 };

and not like this:

var res = { 1.0, 2.0, null };

so there is no reason for the compiler to think res is an array of nullable decimals.

Now you are using a ternary operator which must always return the same (or an equivalent castable) type from both sides.

But as res.First() is a 'decimal' and your null by default is untyped it just makes your null equivalent to the type of your first argument (res.First() i.e. a decimal). By forcing the null to be typed as a nullable decimal ('decimal?') you are actually forcing the compiler to treat res.First() as a nullable decimal too.

However, a better solution overall for you is this:

public decimal? Get()
{
    decimal?[] res = ...
    return res.FirstOrDefault();
}
share|improve this answer
    
The "better solution overalll" assumes res contains nullable decimals, which you've already assumed is not the case at the beginning of your answer. Given a world where res may not contain nullable decimals, then the "better overall solution" is incorrect. –  Anthony Pegram Jun 9 '10 at 16:05
    
Great point - I thought FirstOrDefault would return a NULL but default(decimal) is in fact 0.0M. –  Matt Mitchell Jun 9 '10 at 16:34

In second case you can use res.FirstOrDefault().

IEnumerable<T>.FirstOrDefault() returns first T in set or default<T> if set is empty: null for classes and some default value for structs, in common case - 0.

public decimal? Get()
{
    var res = ...
    return res.FirstOrDefault();
}

which is equal to

public decimal? Get()
{
    var res = ...
    return res.Count() > 0 ? res.First() : default(decimal?);
}
share|improve this answer
1  
FirstOrDefault() for a decimal list would be 0M, regardless of whether you cast the value to decimal? afterwards. This presents a problem. Is 0M a case of a value not existing or is 0M the first value in the list? –  Anthony Pegram Jun 9 '10 at 16:07

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.