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What would be the fastest way to list the names of files from 1000+ directories and sub-directories?

EDIT; The current code I use is:

import java.io.File;

public class DirectoryReader {

  static int spc_count=-1;

  static void Process(File aFile) {
    spc_count++;
    String spcs = "";
    for (int i = 0; i < spc_count; i++)
      spcs += " ";
    if(aFile.isFile())
      System.out.println(spcs + "[FILE] " + aFile.getName());
    else if (aFile.isDirectory()) {
      System.out.println(spcs + "[DIR] " + aFile.getName());
      File[] listOfFiles = aFile.listFiles();
      if(listOfFiles!=null) {
        for (int i = 0; i < listOfFiles.length; i++)
          Process(listOfFiles[i]);
      } else {
        System.out.println(spcs + " [ACCESS DENIED]");
      }
    }
    spc_count--;
  }

  public static void main(String[] args) {
    String nam = "D:/";
    File aFile = new File(nam);
    Process(aFile);
  }

}
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What do you mean by fastest? simplest to code, best performing on a certain OS, or best performing for certain directory structures? –  Peter Recore Jun 9 '10 at 17:02
    
Well in my case; to be fast on WinXP and the simplest possible. –  Adnan Jun 9 '10 at 17:03
    
thanks for this @Adnan! –  Rye Sep 7 '11 at 9:53
    
Cooool !!!!!!!! –  XXX May 24 '12 at 7:20
    
Upvoting because this is a common usecase and it certainly helped me –  Redandwhite Jul 27 '12 at 7:53
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5 Answers

up vote 8 down vote accepted

This looks fine (Recursively going through the directory) The bottleneck will be all the file i/o you need to do, optimizing your Java will not show any real improvements.

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Thank you @Romain Hippeau –  Adnan Jun 9 '10 at 17:30
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As this answer shows up on top of google, i'm adding a java 7 nio solution for listing all files and directories, it is takes about 80% less time on my system.

try {
    Path startPath = Paths.get("c:/");
    Files.walkFileTree(startPath, new SimpleFileVisitor<Path>() {
        @Override
        public FileVisitResult preVisitDirectory(Path dir,
                BasicFileAttributes attrs) {
            System.out.println("Dir: " + dir.toString());
            return FileVisitResult.CONTINUE;
        }

        @Override
        public FileVisitResult visitFile(Path file, BasicFileAttributes attrs) {
            System.out.println("File: " + file.toString());    
            return FileVisitResult.CONTINUE;
        }

        @Override
        public FileVisitResult visitFileFailed(Path file, IOException e) {
            return FileVisitResult.CONTINUE;
        }
    });
} catch (IOException e) {
    e.printStackTrace();
}
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The only improvement is to get rid of static spc_count and pass spcs string as a parameter to Process.

public static void main(String[] args) {
  String nam = "D:/";
  File aFile = new File(nam);
  Process("", aFile);
}

And when doing recursive call, do

static void Process( String spcs, File aFile) {
  ...
  Process(spcs + " ", listOfFiles[i]);
  ...
}

This way you can call this method from more than 1 thread.

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Thank you for the tip @Alexander Pogrebnyak –  Adnan Jun 9 '10 at 18:59
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Until Java 7 introduces the new java.nio.file classes (like DirectoryStream), I'm afraid what you already have will be the fastest.

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Thank you @R. Bemrose –  Adnan Jun 9 '10 at 17:31
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If you're open to using a 3rd party library, check out javaxt-core. It includes a multi-threaded recursive directory search that should be faster than iterating through one directory at a time. There are some examples here:

http://www.javaxt.com/javaxt-core/io/Directory/Recursive_Directory_Search

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