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I'm new to both unit testing and Visual Studio 2010 (just upgraded from 2008). I'm interested in using VS2010's new built-in unit testing tools, but would like to get the lay of the land first. I haven't been able to find any resources or tutorials on unit testing with VS2010 specifically - has anyone found a good walk-through?

I'm also open to persuasion that we should stick with NUnit or the like, if anyone knows a reason to avoid the built-in tools.

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PEX and PEX Tutorial

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PEX is good for white box unit testing but may not be viable for some projects as it's under Microsoft Research Licence which specifically states non Commercial use :( - research.microsoft.com/en-us/projects/pex/license.aspx –  Russ Cam Jun 9 '10 at 20:35
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Not true. You can use it commercially. It is now officially a power toy and is covered under this license --> research.microsoft.com/en-us/projects/pex/rtwpowertool.rtf –  Srikar Doddi Jun 9 '10 at 21:12
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Here's a Channel9 video titled "TestDriven Development with Visual Studio 2010".

She goes through the basics of the Test Project, and it seems a good intro, Channel9-style!

Aside: This is vintage 2008 material, and the GUI of Visual Studio doesn't look like RTM. You can see though, when she selects text, that it appears to highlight ala 2010.

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I prefer using open source tools such as NUnit, the reason is, if you use the built-in testing tools in your projects, those will not be available to developers running express versions of Visual Studio. This might not be a good enough reason for you but it is for me, specially when you work with .NET open source projects.

Good luck!

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