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How can you view printf output in a Win32 application (entering with a WinMain) in Visual Studio 2010?

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Do you want to open a separate console window from the app, or do you want to display it in a control on the main app window? Or log it to a file? –  Mark Ransom Jun 9 '10 at 19:45
    
Actually I was hoping for something like the console window in xcode where you can see console output without having to change any code. A log showing stdout would do fine too. –  Nick Jun 9 '10 at 20:05
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5 Answers

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Strictly answering your question, you may use printf like functions in a Win32 Application in Visual Studio 2010 using the winbase.h OutputDebugString function.

I wrote a simple program that shows how to do it.


#include <windows.h>
#include <stdio.h>

int WINAPI WinMain(HINSTANCE hInstance, HINSTANCE hPrevInstance, LPSTR lpCmdShow, int nCmdShow)
{
    int number = 10;

    char str[256];

    sprintf_s(str, "It works! - number: %d \n", number);

    OutputDebugString(str);

    return 0;
}

The OutputDebugString function takes a LPCSTR as a parameter. I used the sprintf_s to format the string before printing.

This would print the result to the VS 2010 output window.

I hope it helps!

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Obviously the 256 is there only for example but I like this approach. Definitely what I had in mind. –  Nick Jun 30 '11 at 18:19
    
Sure, just an example. You may wrap it in a class/function for convenience. Glad it helped! Cheers! –  icwnd Jul 5 '11 at 21:34
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I know that I have done this in the past using the AllocConsole function, but I also recall that it was just a little trickier than I expected.

A quick Google search on AllocConsole yields what is apparently a Windows Developer Journal article that seems relevant. From there, the following seems similar to what I recall, vague as it is.

void SetStdOutToNewConsole()
{
  int hConHandle;
  long lStdHandle;
  FILE *fp;

  // allocate a console for this app
  AllocConsole();

  // redirect unbuffered STDOUT to the console
  lStdHandle = (long)GetStdHandle(STD_OUTPUT_HANDLE);
  hConHandle = _open_osfhandle(lStdHandle, _O_TEXT);
  fp = _fdopen( hConHandle, "w" );
  *stdout = *fp;

  setvbuf( stdout, NULL, _IONBF, 0 );
}
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You'll need a console window. By far the easiest way to get one is to change a linker option: Project + Properties, Linker, System, SubSystem = Console. Add a main() method:

int main() {
    return _tWinMain(GetModuleHandle(NULL), NULL, GetCommandLine(), SW_SHOW);
}
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_tWinMain is the main function instead called WinMain for a Win32 application –  Riaz Rizvi Jan 28 at 3:57
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Thanks torak for your answer. It helped me a lot.

I needed a bigger scroll back buffer so made a few additions after taking a look at the API functions. Shared here in case it helps anybody else:

void SetStdOutToNewConsole()
{
    // allocate a console for this app
    AllocConsole();

    // redirect unbuffered STDOUT to the console
    HANDLE consoleHandle = GetStdHandle(STD_OUTPUT_HANDLE);
    int fileDescriptor = _open_osfhandle((intptr_t)consoleHandle, _O_TEXT);
    FILE *fp = _fdopen( fileDescriptor, "w" );
    *stdout = *fp;
    setvbuf( stdout, NULL, _IONBF, 0 );

    // give the console window a nicer title
    SetConsoleTitle(L"Debug Output");

    // give the console window a bigger buffer size
    CONSOLE_SCREEN_BUFFER_INFO csbi;
    if ( GetConsoleScreenBufferInfo(consoleHandle, &csbi) )
    {
        COORD bufferSize;
        bufferSize.X = csbi.dwSize.X;
        bufferSize.Y = 9999;
        SetConsoleScreenBufferSize(consoleHandle, bufferSize);
    }
}

This increases the scroll back (screen buffer) height to 9999 lines.

Tested on Windows XP and Windows 7.

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Here is a page that will tell you how to do this, including sample code.

You must create a console window using AllocConsole(), then associate the C standard file handles to the HANDLEs of the new console window.

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