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Tie::Hash has these:

sub FIRSTKEY { my $a = scalar keys %{$_[0]}; each %{$_[0]} }
sub NEXTKEY  { each %{$_[0]} }

NEXTKEY takes two arguments, one of which is the last key but that arg is never referenced?

The various Tie docs don't shed any light on this other than this in perltie:

my $a = keys %{$self->{LIST}};      # reset each() iterator

looking at the doc for each doesn't add to this.

What's going on?

share|improve this question

You only need to worry about the second argument to NEXTKEY if you care about which key was accessed last. By default, hashes don't care about the order, so it is not used.

As for the second part, the keys function in scalar context returns the number of items in the hash. Any call to keys resets the iterator used by keys and each because it exhausts the iterator.

A call to keys is really a call to FIRSTKEY and calls to NEXTKEY until there are no more items left in that haven't been returned.

A call to each is a call to FIRSTKEY (if FIRSTKEY hasn't been called yet) or a call to NEXTKEY (if FIRSTKEY has been called).

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;

my $i = 0;
tie my %h, "HASH::Sorted", map { $_ => $i++ } "a" .. "g";

for my $key (keys %h) {
    print "$key => $h{$key}\n";
}
print "\n";

my $first = each %h;
print "first $first => $h{$first}\n";

my ($second_key, $second_value) = each %h;
print "second $second_key => $second_value\n";

print "\nall of them again:\n";
for my $key (keys %h) {
    print "$key => $h{$key}\n";
}

package HASH::Sorted;

sub TIEHASH {
    my $class = shift;

    return bless { _hash => { @_ } }, $class;
}

sub FETCH {
    my ($self, $key) = @_;

    return $self->{_hash}{$key};
}

sub STORE {
    my ($self, $key, $value) = @_;

    return $self->{_hash}{$key} = $value;
}

sub DELETE {
    my ($self, $key) = @_;

    return delete $self->{_hash}{$key};
}

sub CLEAR {
    my $self = shift;

    %{$self->{_hash}} = ();
}

sub EXISTS {
    my ($self, $key) = @_;

    return exists $self->{_hash}{$key};
}

sub FIRSTKEY {
    my $self = shift;

    #build iterator     
    $self->{_list} = [ sort keys %{$self->{_hash}} ];    

    return $self->NEXTKEY;
}

sub NEXTKEY {
    my $self = shift;

    return shift @{$self->{_list}};
}

sub SCALAR {
    my $self = shift;
    return scalar %{$self->{_hash}};
}
share|improve this answer
1  
under what circumstances is NEXTKEY called in an array context? I've never seen logic for a multi-value return from that method. – pilcrow Jun 10 '10 at 15:28
    
@pilcrow It isn't, I mistakenly assumed that my ($k, $v) = each %h; would call FIRSTKEY and NEXTKEY in list context, apparently it calls FETCH to get the value. I will change the code. – Chas. Owens Jun 10 '10 at 15:54
    
whew, thanks. You turned my understanding of perltie upside-down there for a moment. :) – pilcrow Jun 10 '10 at 16:02
    
Can you comment on how to handle multiple simultaneous loops over the same object. There is only one _list – mmccoo Jun 10 '10 at 17:07
    
@mmccoo Perl's default hashes don't support multiple iterators, but it is possible to do, but you must use a custom method, I will create a second answer with one solution. – Chas. Owens Jun 10 '10 at 18:23

This one uses a custom each method to allow you to iterate over the sorted hash more than one time. All of the standard rules about not being allowed to add or remove keys are still in effect though. It would be trivial to add a warning that iterators were still in use on a call to STORE or DELETE.

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;

my $i = 0;
tie my %h, "HASH::Sorted", map { $_ => $i++ } "a" .. "g";

for my $key (keys %h) {
    print "$key => $h{$key}\n";
}
print "\n";

my $first = each %h;
print "first $first => $h{$first}\n";

my ($second_key, $second_value) = each %h;
print "second $second_key => $second_value\n";

print "\nall of them again:\n";
for my $key (keys %h) {
    print "$key => $h{$key}\n";
}

print "\nmultiple iterators\n";

my $o = tied %h;
while (my ($k, $v) = $o->each("outer")) {
    print "$k => $v\n";

    while (my ($k, $v) = $o->each("inner")) {
        print "\t$k => $v\n";
    }
}

print "\nhybrid solution\n";
while (my ($k, $v) = each %h) {
    print "$k => $v\n";

    #the iter_name is an empty string
    while (my ($k, $v) = $o->each) {
        print "\t$k => $v\n";
    }
}


package HASH::Sorted;

sub each {
    my ($self, $iter_name) = (@_, "DEFAULT");

    #each has not been called yet for this iter
    unless (exists $self->{_iters}{$iter_name}) {
        $self->{_iters}{$iter_name} = [ sort keys %{$self->{_hash}} ];
    }

    #end of list
    unless (@{$self->{_iters}{$iter_name}}) {
        delete $self->{_iters}{$iter_name};
        return;
    }

    my $key = shift @{$self->{_iters}{$iter_name}};

    if (wantarray) {
        return $key, $self->{_hash}{$key};
    }

    return $key;
}

sub TIEHASH {
    my $class = shift;

    return bless {
        _hash => { @_ },
        _iters => {},
    }, $class;
}

sub FETCH {
    my ($self, $key) = @_;

    return $self->{_hash}{$key};
}

sub STORE {
    my ($self, $key, $value) = @_;

    return $self->{_hash}{$key} = $value;
}

sub DELETE {
    my ($self, $key) = @_;

    return delete $self->{_hash}{$key};
}

sub CLEAR {
    my $self = shift;

    %{$self->{_hash}} = ();
}

sub EXISTS {
    my ($self, $key) = @_;

    return exists $self->{_hash}{$key};
}

sub FIRSTKEY {
    my $self = shift;

    #build iterator     
    $self->{_list} = [ sort keys %{$self->{_hash}} ];    

    return $self->NEXTKEY;
}

sub NEXTKEY {
    my $self = shift;

    return shift @{$self->{_list}};
}

sub SCALAR {
    my $self = shift;
    return scalar %{$self->{_hash}};
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the follow up. It seems there should be a way to do this without deviating from the normal looping syntax. One question that comes to mind is how does 'each' store it's state from iteration to the next? each seems to have the ability to 'yield' that the rest of perl does not – mmccoo Jun 11 '10 at 15:27
    
@mmccoo See hv_iternext in hv.c in the perl source code or in perlapi (perldoc.perl.org/perlapi.html#hv_iternext). – Chas. Owens Jun 11 '10 at 16:04
    
@mmccoo without giving each extra information, how would it know which iterator to use? The normal thing to do when you want to iterate over the same hash at different rates is to use keys to get the list of keys and iterate over that instead. Out of curiosity, why do you want to be able to have two hash iterators? – Chas. Owens Jun 11 '10 at 16:09
    
@mmccoo Schwern is looking into making each capable of iterating more than one thing at a time. The tentative plan is to use Devel::Declare to modify every each function into safe_each UNIQUE_ID. Take a look here: github.com/schwern/perl5i/issues/issue/142 – Chas. Owens Jun 24 '10 at 10:55

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