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I'm hosting a project in Github, but now I purchased a plan with Dreamhost that includes shell access and Git.

      Github [Origin]
       /         \
  pull/           \pull
     /push     push\
    /               \  
Laptop           Dreamhost
(cloned)          (cloned)

I would like to delete my repo from Github, and starting push directly to DH.

How do I change origin in my Laptop, and should I delete the origin in Dreamhost?

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6 Answers 6

up vote 28 down vote accepted

The easiest way is to edit your .git/config file on your laptop. Simply search for your github url and replace it with the one from DreamHost. Make sure that your ssh public key is set on Dreamhost. Now you can push origin master and you will have populated your dreamhost repository.

You can delete origin on dreamhost but there is no need.

Also, ensure that the repository that is there is bare. By default, you cannot push to non-bare repositories.

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1  
Thanks, by ssl you mean SSH ? –  benoror Jun 10 '10 at 3:35
1  
yes, sorry.. that's a type-o.. updating –  Adam Dymitruk Jun 10 '10 at 3:41
    
Well, as you said, it's a non-bare repo, I'm a little confused. What to do now ? –  benoror Jun 10 '10 at 3:48
    
Found stackoverflow.com/questions/1784506/… –  benoror Jun 10 '10 at 3:55
    
As above, all you need is the --bare option when cloning what is going to be an upstream repo. –  Adam Dymitruk Jun 10 '10 at 5:01
git remote rename origin github
git remote add origin <DreamHost-git-URL>
# test and make sure the DreamHost origin works properly for fetch and push
git remote rm github

I prefer using the 'git remote' command instead of screwing about with the .git/config file by hand.

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2  
I agree. I consider the format of .git/config an implementation detail, I always use the tools like git remote and git config to make sure I don't screw up the syntax. –  Jörg W Mittag Jun 10 '10 at 15:10
1  
Oh +1 because I like this. But you should add further infos how to migrate the tracking branches afterwards... –  hurikhan77 Jun 12 '10 at 19:45
    
I had to add git config branch.master.remote origin. It seems like git changed that variable as a side effect of the remote rename. –  Daniel Luna Jul 12 '11 at 21:41
4  
I had to run following commands: git config branch.master.remote origin git config branch.master.merge refs/heads/master –  JoaoHornburg Feb 15 '12 at 18:29
    
@DanielLuna thanks for your comment, I added this to the answer. –  Thomas Sep 6 '12 at 8:56

The easiest way is:

$ git config remote.origin.url <Dreamhost-git-URL>

You show the remotes after this:

$ git remote -v
origin Dreamhost-git-URL (fetch)
origin Dreamhost-git-URL (push)
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2  
I think this solution looks a lot easier then the 50+ answer ... –  Thomas Sep 6 '12 at 8:57
    
Yep, seems the best solution. –  Profpatsch Mar 13 '13 at 14:27

The best way is to git remote set-url origin <new-url>

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The easiest way is to edit your .git/config file, which lists where the origin lives. You can test it by running a git fetch

You can delete the remote references on the Dreamhost side if you like, in the same file.

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why not simply :

git remote remove origin

git remote add origin <Dreamhost-git-URL>

git push -u origin --all
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