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While I found similar question I didn't find an answer to my problem

When I try to rename the directory from FOO to foo via git mv FOO foo I get

fatal: renaming 'FOO' failed: Invalid argument

OK. So I try git mv FOO foo2 && git mv foo2 foo

But when I try to commit via git commit . I get

# On branch master
# Untracked files:
#   (use "git add <file>..." to include in what will be committed)
#
# foo
nothing added to commit but untracked files present (use "git add" to track)

When I add the directory via git add foo nothing changes and git commit . gives me the same message again.

What am I doing wrong? I thought I'm using a case-sensitive system (OSX) why can't I simply rename the directory?

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5  
OS X's file system isn't case-sensitive. –  mipadi Jun 10 '10 at 4:47
1  
@mipadi It can operate in case-sensitive mode but that's usually off by default. –  GordonM Jun 15 '12 at 12:07

8 Answers 8

up vote 165 down vote accepted

You are in a case insensitive environment. Further, adding with out the -A will not take care of the remove side of the mv as Git understands it. Warning! Ensure that no other changes or untracked files are around when you do this or they will get committed as part of this change! git stash -u first, do this and then git stash pop after. Continuing: To get around this, do the following:

mv foo foo2
git add -A
git commit -m "renaming"
mv foo2 FOO
git add -A
git commit --amend -m "renamed foo to FOO"

That's the drawn out way of changing the working directory, committing and then collapsing the 2 commits. You can just move the file in the index, but to someone that is new to git, it may not be explicit enough as to what is happening. The shorter version is

git mv foo foo2
git mv foo2 FOO
git commit -m "changed case of dir"

As suggested in one of the comments, you can also do an interactive rebase (git rebase -i HEAD~5 if the wrong case was introduced 5 commits ago) to fix the case there and not have the wrong case appear anywhere in the history at all. You have to be careful if you do this as the commit hashes from then on will be different and others will have to rebase or re-merge their work with that recent past of the branch.

this is related to correcting the name of a file: Is git not case sensitive?

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1  
Thanks. This was driving me crazy. I didn't know about the -A or the --amend option. –  oschrenk Jun 10 '10 at 5:18
1  
very helpful, thank you –  Allyn Jun 14 '11 at 15:59
1  
Careful with the -A, since it will recursively add all content in your current directory, including untracked stuff. Might be better to just git add foo2. –  rich.e Dec 22 '12 at 4:00
    
That is correct. However you will need to stage both the removal of foo2 as well as the addition of FOO separately. -A takes care of both. Vice versa for the first step. I'll add the warning. Thanks! –  Adam Dymitruk Dec 23 '12 at 20:00
    
You can also clean up your history with an interactive rebase git rebase -i HEAD~2. Note: To simplify this, set the final message in your first commit and fixup the second one. –  Alex B. Aug 21 '13 at 12:47

You want to set the option core.ignorecase to false, which will make Git pay attention to case on file systems that don't natively support it. To enable in your repo:

$ git config core.ignorecase false

Then you can rename the file with git mv and it'll work as expected.

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I think this may have undesirable effects elsewhere. Case insensitive systems should let Git think that it's the same dir. –  Adam Dymitruk Jun 10 '10 at 5:00
2  
I added the option to my global config but it didn't help –  oschrenk Jun 10 '10 at 5:20
5  
On OS X? It worked for me. –  mipadi Jun 10 '10 at 11:06
2  
I see some weird behavior using this with OSX. hrm I modified a file that doesn't exist .. hrm error: The following untracked working tree files would be overwritten by checkout: but ... those files don't exist. –  Skylar Saveland Aug 26 '11 at 15:04
    
This was exactly what I was looking for. I am running CentOS 5.6 and it did not pick up the change of case. –  crmpicco Apr 10 at 8:31

I was able to resolve this, using git 1.7.7 as follows:

$ git mv improper_Case improve_case2
$ git mv improve_case2 improve_case
$ git commit -m "<your message>"

Apparently the 6 character improvement requirement which StackOverflow imposes doesn't help when trying to correct small mistakes.

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Interesting. Maybe GIT improved something since then. When I'll stumble upon this problem again, I'll try this again. –  oschrenk May 29 '12 at 12:04
    
much easier doing it this way –  olore Jul 17 '12 at 22:04

You're not using a case-sensitive filesystem in OS X unless you explicitly choose such. HFS+ can be case-sensitive, but the default is case-insensitive.

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3  
Using the case-sensitive file system on OS X is not a good idea. A lot of apps do NOT work correctly, I learned from trying this. One particular problem is that Adobe Photoshop will refuse to install saying that case-sensitive file system is not supported. –  orange80 Sep 9 '11 at 17:01

(git mv-free variant.)

I ran into this problem in Git on Mac OS X 10.9. I solved it as follows:

git rm -r --cached /path/to/directory

That stages the directory for deletion in Git but does not actually remove any physical files (--cached). This also makes the directory, now with the proper case, show up in untracked files.

So you can do this:

mv /path/to/directory /path/to/DIRECTORY
git add -A /path/to/DIRECTORY

Git will then recognize that you have renamed the files, and when you do git status you should see a number of renamed: lines. Inspect them and ensure they look correct, and if so, you can commit the changes normally.

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I found that the mv command didn't work to actually rename the directory; I had to rename it within Finder. Other than that this fix works perfectly. –  Adam S Sep 12 at 13:40

Force it with -f option:

git mv -f FOO foo
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Improving Adam Dymitruk's answer (silly that SO doesn't let me comment his answer), using "git mv" will automatically stage exactly the moved files. No stashing is needed and the risky "git add -A" can be avoided:

old="abc";    new="ABC";
tmp="$old-renamed";
git mv "$old" "$tmp";
git commit -m "Renamed '$old' to '$tmp'.";
git mv "$tmp" "$new";
git commit --amend -m "Renamed '$old' to '$new'.";
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Here's a really simple solution around all the gitfoo on this page.

  1. Copy the files out of your project manually.
  2. git rm all the files.
  3. git commit like normal.
  4. add the files back manually.
  5. git add all the files.
  6. git commit like normal.
  7. profit.
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