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I'd like to be able to do:

>>> class a(str):
...     pass
...
>>> b = a()
>>> b.__class__ = str
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
TypeError: __class__ assignment: only for heap types
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closely related: stackoverflow.com/questions/990758/… –  balpha Jun 10 '10 at 9:57
    
I'd like to say that this is a fairly bad message from the interpreter, since the term "heap type" isn't familiar to most Python programmers and there doesn't appear to be any way in Python 3 to create a class whose instances have an assignable class. Or at least I haven't found one. –  holdenweb Mar 30 at 20:34
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3 Answers 3

Python 2 doesn't have a unified object hierarchy (ie. not everything is descended from the object class). Anything that is part of this hierarchy can be played with via class, but those that aren't cannot be modified in this way (or at all, really). These are called Python's "types", and they're hard-coded in C. Examples of types are str, int, float, list, tuple, etc. This means that you cannot use types in the same ways as classes, for example you cannot change the class of an instance of a type, you cannot add, remove or modify methods of types, etc. The following transcript shows the difference in behaviour between types such as str (hard-coded, non-dynamic C constructs) and classes I've called A and B (changeable, dynamic, Python constructs):

>>> str
<type 'str'>
>>> class A:
...     pass
... 
>>> a = A()
>>> A
<class __main__.A at 0xb747f2cc>
>>> a
<__main__.A instance at 0xb747e74c>
>>> type(a)
<type 'instance'>
>>> type(A)
<type 'classobj'>
>>> type(str)
<type 'type'>
>>> type(type(a))
<type 'type'>
>>> type(type(A))
<type 'type'>
>>> A.foo = lambda self,x: x
>>> a.foo(10)
10
>>> A().foo(5)
5
>>> str.foo = lambda self,x: x
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
TypeError: can't set attributes of built-in/extension type 'str'
>>> 'abc'.foo(5)
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
AttributeError: 'str' object has no attribute 'foo'
>>> class B:
...     pass
... 
>>> a.__class__
<class __main__.A at 0xb747f2cc>
>>> a.__class__ = B
>>> a
<__main__.B instance at 0xb747e74c>
>>> 'abc'.__class__
<type 'str'>
>>> 'abc'.__class__ = B
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
TypeError: __class__ must be set to new-style class, not 'classobj' object
>>> class B(object):
...     pass
... 
>>> 'abc'.__class__ = B
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
TypeError: __class__ assignment: only for heap types
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up vote 3 down vote accepted

I've solved it in this way:

>>> class C(str):
...     def __getattribute__(self, name):
...         if name == '__class__':
...             return str
...         else:
...             return super(C, self).__getattribute__(name)
...         
>>> c = C()
>>> c.__class__
<type 'str'>
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Very-very big thanks! I was spent many hours trying resolve this! –  seriyPS Dec 25 '10 at 15:53
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Only classes that were defined with a class keyword could be used for __class__ attribute assignment:

>>> class C:
    pass

>>> class D:
    pass

>>> C().__class__ = D
>>>
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No it isn​'​t​. –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Jun 10 '10 at 9:56
    
That´s not what they say here:bytes.com/topic/python/answers/449635-assigning-self-class –  Juanjo Conti Jun 10 '10 at 9:57
    
In fact, I think __mro__ is the only read-only attribute there. –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Jun 10 '10 at 10:00
    
@Ignacio, @Juanjo: thanks corrected. –  SilentGhost Jun 10 '10 at 10:14
    
I think this is not total true. You may have class A(str) and you cant assign A. –  Juanjo Conti Jun 10 '10 at 11:30
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