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There's a really obvious refactoring opportunity in this (working) code.

bool Translations::compatibleNICodes(const Rule& rule, 
                                     const std::vector<std::string>& nicodes)
{
    bool included = false;

    // Loop through the ni codes.
    for(std::vector<std::string>::const_iterator iter = nicodes.begin();
        iter != nicodes.end();
        ++iter)
    {
        // Match against the ni codes of the rule
        if(rule.get_ni1() == *iter)
        {
            // If there's a match, check if it's flagged include or exclude
            const std::string flag = rule.get_op1();
            // If include, code is included unless a later rule excludes it
            if(flag == "INCLUDE"){ included = true; }
            // If exclude, code is specifically excluded
            else if(flag == "EXCLUDE"){ return false; }
        }
        if(rule.get_ni2() == *iter)
        {
            const std::string flag = rule.get_op2();
            if(flag == "INCLUDE"){ included = true; }
            else if(flag == "EXCLUDE"){ return false; }
        }
        if(rule.get_ni3() == *iter)
        {
            const std::string flag = rule.get_op3();
            if(flag == "INCLUDE"){ included = true; }
            else if(flag == "EXCLUDE"){ return false; }
        }
        if(rule.get_ni4() == *iter)
        {
            const std::string flag = rule.get_op4();
            if(flag == "INCLUDE"){ included = true; }
            else if(flag == "EXCLUDE"){ return false; }
        }
        if(rule.get_ni5() == *iter)
        {
            const std::string flag = rule.get_op5();
            if(flag == "INCLUDE"){ included = true; }
            else if(flag == "EXCLUDE"){ return false; }
        }
    }
    return included;
}

I want to turn it to something like:

bool Translations::compatibleNICodes(const Rule& rule, 
                                     const std::vector<std::string>& nicodes)
{
    bool included = false;

    // Loop through the ni codes.
    for(std::vector<std::string>::const_iterator iter = nicodes.begin();
        iter != nicodes.end();
        ++iter)
    {
        // Match against the ni codes of the rule
        included |= matchNICode(rule.get_ni1(), rule.get_op1);
        included |= matchNICode(rule.get_ni2(), rule.get_op2);
        included |= matchNICode(rule.get_ni3(), rule.get_op3);
        included |= matchNICode(rule.get_ni4(), rule.get_op4);
        included |= matchNICode(rule.get_ni5(), rule.get_op5);
    }
    return included;
}

bool Translations::matchNICode(const std::string& ni, 
                               const std::string& op)
{
    if(ni == *iter)
    {
        if(op == "INCLUDE"){ return true; }
        else if(op == "EXCLUDE"){ /*Return worse than false*/ }
    }
    return false;
}

The problem is that I can't get around the problem that I want to exit early if it's an exclude statement.

Note that I can't change the structure of the Rule class.

Any advice?

share|improve this question
    
Why can't you change the structure of the rule class? –  anon Jun 10 '10 at 10:26
    
Rule's a library class, and I don't have access rights. –  deworde Jun 10 '10 at 10:34
    
Refactoring should give some advatange e.g. in understandability of code. Refactoring that way makes compatibleNICodes (CNC) not clearer if matchNICode(MNC) can return to the caller of CNC.If MNC could return to the caller of CNC,it would return false in anycase, not distinguishable from a false from CNC; that can't happen "by design" and you could change`return included`into return true(provided that MNC is able to return directly to the caller of CNC);this means that at the end of each "iter"loop included is true...or MNC has returned false to the caller of CNC.This suggest: >> –  ShinTakezou Jun 10 '10 at 11:34
    
<< This suggest to eliminate the sudden return to CNC caller (which s not possible) from MNC and put in And all the values returned by MNC (which returns true or false, to CNC); if ( !(MNC(..) && MNC(...) && ... )) return false; –  ShinTakezou Jun 10 '10 at 11:36
    
BTW, for Boolean logic you need to use the || operator not the bitwise operator |. So the statement is: included = include || ... –  Thomas Matthews Jun 10 '10 at 15:26

7 Answers 7

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Obviously the code would be much cleaner and simpler, if you could iterate through the ni and op members of Rule in a loop. If you can't refactor Rule, maybe you could create a wrapper around it to achieve this goal.

If you have a single method with such code, I wouldn't bother though. IMO this would only pay off if you can eliminate the duplicated code in several similar methods.

share|improve this answer
    
True. What I was wondering is if there was a way to refactor so that the if statements could be refactored to a sub-routine. –  deworde Jun 10 '10 at 10:13
1  
@deworde, the early exit makes it difficult indeed :-( Of course you could code around it, but the result would be more complicated and less understandable then the current code IMHO. –  Péter Török Jun 10 '10 at 10:27

One possible refactoring is the below, but I'm not sure if it is worth the trouble

#define NI_CLAUSE(ID) \
        if(rule.get_ni ## ID() == *iter) \
        { \
            const std::string flag = rule.get_op ## ID(); \
            if(flag == "INCLUDE"){ included = true; } \
            else if(flag == "EXCLUDE"){ return false; } \
        }

bool Translations::compatibleNICodes(const Rule& rule, 
                                     const std::vector<std::string>& nicodes)
{
    bool included = false;

    // Loop through the ni codes.
    for(std::vector<std::string>::const_iterator iter = nicodes.begin();
        iter != nicodes.end();
        ++iter)
    {
        NI_CLAUSE(1)
        NI_CLAUSE(2)
        NI_CLAUSE(3)
        NI_CLAUSE(4)
        NI_CLAUSE(5)
    }
    return included;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Best option so far. –  deworde Jun 10 '10 at 10:26
3  
I would undef that macro after usage, just as a precaution –  daramarak Jun 10 '10 at 10:58
1  
it's good but it is not refactoring, the code ends to be the same. –  ShinTakezou Jun 10 '10 at 11:47

I assume that the get_niX() or get_opX() methods have some kind of side effect; otherwise, as soon as you get a true, you would want to exit.

If the thing returned from matchNICode() is really worse than false, it may be an exception. In this case, it is quite simple:

bool Translations::compatibleNICodes(const Rule& rule, 
                                     const std::vector<std::string>& nicodes)
{
    bool included = false;

    try
    {
      // Loop through the ni codes.
      for(std::vector<std::string>::const_iterator iter = nicodes.begin();
          iter != nicodes.end();
          ++iter)
      {
        // Match against the ni codes of the rule
        included |= matchNICode(rule.get_ni1(), rule.get_op1);
        included |= matchNICode(rule.get_ni2(), rule.get_op2);
        included |= matchNICode(rule.get_ni3(), rule.get_op3);
        included |= matchNICode(rule.get_ni4(), rule.get_op4);
        included |= matchNICode(rule.get_ni5(), rule.get_op5);
      }
      return included;
    }
    catch (WorseThanFalseException& ex)
    {
      return false; // Or whatever you have to do and return
    }
}

bool Translations::matchNICode(const std::string& ni, 
                               const std::string& op)
{
    if(ni == *iter)
    {
        if(op == "INCLUDE"){ return true; }
        else if(op == "EXCLUDE"){ throw WorseThanFalseException(); } // Whatever this is
    }
    return false;
}
share|improve this answer
bool Translations::compatibleNICodes(const Rule& rule,
                                     const std::vector<std::string>& nicodes)
{
    bool included = false;

    struct
    {
      RULE_GET_NI get_ni;
      RULE_GET_OP get_op;
    } method_tbl[] =
    {
      { &Rule::get_ni1, &Rule::get_op1 },
      { &Rule::get_ni2, &Rule::get_op2 },
      { &Rule::get_ni3, &Rule::get_op3 },
      { &Rule::get_ni4, &Rule::get_op4 },
      { &Rule::get_ni5, &Rule::get_op5 },
    };
    // Loop through the ni codes.
    for(std::vector<std::string>::const_iterator iter = nicodes.begin();
        iter != nicodes.end();
        ++iter)
    {
        for(size_t n = 0; n < 5 /* I am lazy here */; ++n)
        {
            if((rule.*(method_tbl[n].get_ni))() == *iter)
            {
                // If there's a match, check if the rule is include or exclude
                const std::string flag = (rule.*(method_tbl[n].get_op))();
                // If include, code is included unless a later rule excludes it
                if(flag == "INCLUDE"){ included = true; }
                // If exclude, code is specifically excluded
                else if(flag == "EXCLUDE"){ return false; }
            }
        }
    }
    return included;
}

The answer was edited to include only final version.

BTW this problem is fun, just give me some more time and I come up with stl algorithm and functor...

share|improve this answer
    
I like this (+1), allows for both the ideas scattered (for loop and "hiding" of the ugly get_ni/opN in Rule problem) –  ShinTakezou Jun 10 '10 at 10:39
    
I wasn't looking for something this complex really, but I do like the final version. Can you do an edit that just includes that? –  deworde Jun 10 '10 at 10:57

You could get around by creating some kind of tribool class and use lazy evaluation.

class TriState
{
public:
  TriState(): mState(KO) {}

  bool isValid() const { return mState != FATAL; }

  bool ok() const { return mState == OK; }

  void update(std::string const& value,
              std::string const& reference,
              std::string const& action)
  {
    if (mState == FATAL) return;

    if (value == reference)
    {
      if (action == "INCLUDE") mState = OK;
      else if (action == "EXCLUDE") mState = FATAL;
    }
  }

private:
  typedef enum { OK, KO, FATAL } State_t;
  State_t mState;
};

Then you can use the loop as such:

TriState state;

for (const_iterator it = nicodes.begin(), end = nicodes.end();
     it != end && state.isValid(); ++it)
{
   state.update(*it, rule.get_ni1(), rule.get_op1);
   state.update(*it, rule.get_ni2(), rule.get_op2);
   state.update(*it, rule.get_ni3(), rule.get_op3);
   state.update(*it, rule.get_ni4(), rule.get_op4);
   state.update(*it, rule.get_ni5(), rule.get_op5);
}

return state.ok();

Now, if the operation on rule have some kind of side effect that should be avoided, you use a wrapper to get lazy evaluation.

class Wrapper
{
public:
  Wrapper(Rule const& rule): mRule(rule) {}

  std::string const& get_ni(size_t i) const { switch(i) { ... } }
  std::string const& get_action(size_t i) const { switch(i) { ... } }

private:
  Rule const& mRule;
};

Refactor update:

void update(std::string const& value, Wrapper wrapper, size_t index)
{
  if (mState == FATAL) return;

  if (value == wrapper.get_ni(index))
  {
    if (wrapper.get_action(index) == "INCLUDE") mState = OK;
    else if (wrapper.get_action(index) == "EXCLUDE") mState = FATAL;
  }
}

Use a double loop:

TriState state;
Wrapper wrapper(rule);

for (const_iterator it = nicodes.begin(), end = nicodes.end();
     it != end && state.isValid(); ++it)
{
  for (size_t index = 1; index != 6 && state.isValid(); ++index)
    state.update(*it, wrapper, index);
}

return state.ok();

Guideline: Wrap what you can't modify! (look at the Adaptor family of Patterns)

share|improve this answer

This is promised algorithms based solution and it is hardcore... And they are saying STL is here to simplify our programs (this is waaaay longer then the other solution I proposed).

struct FUNCTOR : std::unary_function<bool, std::string const &>
{
  public:
    FUNCTOR(Rule const &r) : included(false), rule(r)
    {
    }
    // returns true if exluded
    bool operator()(std::string const &s)
    {
      static METHODS methods[] =
      {
        { &Rule::get_ni1, &Rule::get_op1 },
        { &Rule::get_ni2, &Rule::get_op2 },
        { &Rule::get_ni3, &Rule::get_op3 },
        { &Rule::get_ni4, &Rule::get_op4 },
        { &Rule::get_ni5, &Rule::get_op5 },
      };
      return(std::find_if(&methods[0], &methods[5], FUNCTOR2(rule, s, included)) != &methods[5]);
    }
    operator bool()
    {
      return(included);
    }
  private:
    struct METHODS
    {
      std::string (Rule::*get_ni)() const;
      std::string (Rule::*get_op)() const;
    };
    struct FUNCTOR2 : std::unary_function<bool, METHODS>
    {
      public:
        FUNCTOR2(Rule const &r, std::string const &s, bool &incl) : rule(r), str(s), included(incl)
        {
        }
        // return true if exluded
        bool operator()(METHODS m)
        {
          if((rule.*m.get_ni)() == str)
          {
            // If there's a match, check if the rule is include or exclude
            const std::string flag = (rule.*m.get_op)();
            // If include, code is included unless a later rule excludes it
            if(flag == "INCLUDE")
              included = true;
            // If exclude, code is specifically excluded
            else if(flag == "EXCLUDE")
            {
              included = false;
              return(true);
            }
          }
          return(false);
        }
      private:
        Rule const &rule;
        std::string const &str;
        bool &included;
    };
    Rule const &rule;
    bool included;
};

bool Translations::compatibleNICodes(const Rule& rule,
                                     const std::vector<std::string>& nicodes)
{
  FUNCTOR f(rule);
  std::find_if(nicodes.begin(), nicodes.end(), f);
  return(f);
}
share|improve this answer

Using a in/out parameter is a straightforward and efficient way to get two return values:

Plus I presume you need lazy evaluation of rule.get_opN()? To do that you'll need to use a pointer-to-member-function.

bool Translations::compatibleNICodes(const Rule& rule, 
                                     const std::vector<std::string>& nicodes)
{
    bool included = false;

    // Loop through the ni codes.
    for(std::vector<std::string>::const_iterator iter = nicodes.begin();
        iter != nicodes.end();
        ++iter)
    {
        // Match against the ni codes of the rule
        if (!matchNICode(rule.get_ni1(), rule, &Rule::get_op1, included)) return false;
        if (!matchNICode(rule.get_ni2(), rule, &Rule::get_op2, included)) return false;
        if (!matchNICode(rule.get_ni3(), rule, &Rule::get_op3, included)) return false;
        if (!matchNICode(rule.get_ni4(), rule, &Rule::get_op4, included)) return false;
        if (!matchNICode(rule.get_ni5(), rule, &Rule::get_op5, included)) return false;
    }
    return included;
}

bool Translations::matchNICode(const std::string& ni, const Rule& rule, 
                               std::string (Rule::* const opfn)(), bool& included)
{
    if (ni == *iter) {
        const std::string& op = (rule.*opfn)();
        if (op == "INCLUDE") {
            included = true;
        }
        else if (op == "EXCLUDE") {
            return false;
        }
    }
    return true;
}
share|improve this answer

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