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I have pointing to, and separately, also and I want the user who visits either, or to share the same sessions. Is this possible? If not, what's the best compromise?

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2 Answers 2

To get applications using the same domain working using the same session cookies, you would configure this in the environment config files.. I do this for some of my applications. This is for Rails 2.3.5 apps, It should be the same for Rails 3, but I am not positive.

First, in config/initializers/session_store.rb, make sure that:

# ActionController::Base.session_store = :active_record_store

is commented out.

Next, all of your applications should use the same key and secret, in the same file, set:

ActionController::Base.session = {
  :key         => '_myapp_session',
  :secret      => 'some really long string of hex'

Finally, configure the environment files to use the same domain:


config.action_controller.session = { 
  :domain => ".rails.local" 


config.action_controller.session = { 
  :domain => "" 
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This still wouldn't work with and And why can't you use active_record_store? –  Tomas Markauskas Jun 10 '10 at 16:48
Edited to add that it only works using the same domain. Using active record store may work across apps on different domains, but you'd probably have to use the same database on both applications, which I was never really able to get working once they moved rails 2.3 to rack, which is why I went with sessions cookies with a shared key and secret. –  Dan McNevin Jun 11 '10 at 2:18
This doesn't answer any of the OP questions. –  rxgx May 16 '12 at 0:39 and can share cookies by setting the cookie domain to This will share cookies across all subdomains of cannot share the cookies with directly, however. There is a solution available using redirects, but it's tricky to implement -- (examples are in, but you could apply the solution to RoR).

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link is outdated –  Mike Atlas Oct 18 '13 at 5:04
@MikeAtlas: well, that's the beauty of a site like Stack Overflow. Instead of down voting because a link is out of date you could spend less than 10 seconds searching Google to find the updated link and edit into the answer. –  Andy E Oct 18 '13 at 9:33
Even better would be to just give code examples here in your post, OP could have searched for 10 seconds on google too. Also, do you really think an ASP.NET solution is a good answer for a RoR question? –  Mike Atlas Oct 18 '13 at 14:48
@Mike: In the absence of an RoR solution, an ASP.NET that is easy to follow is a good enough answer. I've ported code from languages that I'm unfamiliar with myself, many times and I appreciate a half solution when that's all I can get. I agree, code samples would be better, but not being particularly savvy with RoR, I gave the best answer I could give, which was to describe the solution. The first part of my answer may have solved the OP's question, depending on how -> works. You're welcome to provide your own solution, since this one doesn't meet your standards ;-) –  Andy E Oct 18 '13 at 20:12

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