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IEnumerable<String> existedThings = 
        from mdinfo in mdInfoTotal select mdinfo.ItemNo;

IEnumerable<String> thingsToSave = 
        from item in lbXReadSuccess.Items.Cast<ListItem>() select item.Value;

Here are two IEnumerable.

I want to check whether a value in existedThings exist in thingsToSave.

O.K. I can do that with 3 line code.

bool hasItemNo;
foreach(string itemNo in existedThings)
    hasItemNo= thingsToSave.Contains(itemNo);

But, It looks dirty.

I just want to know if there is better solution.

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Sorry about my poor English! –  sunglim Jun 10 '10 at 11:16
2  
Don't worry about it, I've seen far worse from supposed native English speakers. You're doing fine! –  David M Jun 10 '10 at 11:20
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7 Answers 7

up vote 8 down vote accepted
 int[] id1 = { 44, 26, 92, 30, 71, 38 };
 int[] id2 = { 39, 59, 83, 47, 26, 4, 30 };

 IEnumerable<int> both = id1.Intersect(id2);

 foreach (int id in both)
     Console.WriteLine(id);

 //Console.WriteLine((both.Count() > 0).ToString());
 Console.WriteLine(both.Any().ToString());

Look for the Enumerable.Intersect Method

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6  
Use .Any() instead of .Count()>0 to avoid unnecessary iteration. –  Nathan Baulch Jun 10 '10 at 11:25
    
Thanks for that! –  VMAtm Jun 10 '10 at 15:52
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The upvoted answers propose an algorithm that will have O(n^2) complexity if the IEnumerable wasn't derived from a class that implements ICollection<>. A Linq query for example. The Count() extension method then has to iterate all elements to count them. That's not cool. You only need to check if the result contains any elements:

 bool hasItemNo = existedThings.Intersect(thingsToSave).Any();

The order matters btw, make the enumeration that you expect to have the smallest number of items the argument of Intersect().

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+1 for pointing out the order in which you use the collections. –  rsgoheen Jul 7 '11 at 10:37
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You can use Intersect to achieve this:

// puts all items that exists in both lists into the inBoth sequence
IEnumerable<string> inBoth = existedThings.Intersect(thingsToSave);
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bool hasItemNo = existedThings.Intersect(thingsToSave).Count() > 0;

You can even provide your own comparer if you need to: Enumerable.Intersect

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It's dirty and it also won't work! Your hasItemNo would only be true if the last value in existedThings was in thingsToSave.

Since you tagged this with "Linq", though, I'm guessing this code will work for you:

bool hasItemNo = thingsToSave.Intersect(existedThings).Count() > 0
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Good catch on the boolean assignment! +1 –  Lazarus Jun 10 '10 at 11:24
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You may try intersecting the two sequences and see if the resulting sequence contains any elements

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Not absolutely clear on what you really want here but here's a suggestion for retrieving only the strings that exist in the thingstoSave and existedThings.

IEnumerable<String> existedThings = 
        from mdinfo in mdInfoTotal select mdinfo.ItemNo;

IEnumerable<String> thingsToSave = 
        from item in lbXReadSuccess.Items.Cast<ListItem>() 
        where existedThings.Contains(item.Value)
        select item.Value;
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