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I'm creating a jQuery plugin. So far it's working fine, but I'm having doubt about the way I'm doing things:

jQuery.fn.myMethod = function() {
  return this.each(function(){
    MyScope.doSomething(jQuery(this).attr("id"));
  });
};

var MyScope = {

  // The functions contained in MyScope are extremely linked to the logic 
  // of this plugin and it wouldn't make a lot of sense to extract them

  doSomething: function(id){
    // something
    doSomethingElse(23);
    // some more code
    doSomethingElse(55);
  },

  doSomethingElse: function(someInt){
    // some code 
  }
};

I use MyScope to store all my "private" functions. I don't want the user to be able to go $("p").doSomething(), but I do need to use them.

I could move everything in the myMethod function, but it would create a 100 lines long function and people would hate me for it.

What's the best practices in this situation? Are there any great tutorials out there regarding this?

share|improve this question
    
Just something to note, the entire jQuery library is in one function, it's a perfectly legitimate method of scoping, when you need a closure, use a closure :) –  Nick Craver Jun 10 '10 at 14:06

3 Answers 3

up vote 18 down vote accepted

You can encapsulate your functions to do what you want, like this:

jQuery.fn.myMethod = function() {
  return this.each(function(){
    doSomething(jQuery(this).attr("id"));
  });        
  function doSomething(id){
    //do something
  }
  function doSomethingElse(){
    // some code
  }
};

You can view a quick demo here

"I could move everything in the myMethod function, but it would create a 100 lines long function and people would hate me for it." ....why?

The code has to be defined somewhere, if you don't want it to be externally accessible there are a few ways, but I don't see why anyone would dislike you doing exactly this. It's all about scope and where you want things, as long as you're not declaring it multiple times and exposing only what you want, I don't see any problem.

There are several styles to declaring it, some with the same effect, the option I gave is one of many, but placing things inside myMethod is a perfectly reasonable approach.


To be more complete, here's another alternative:

(function($) { 
    function doSomething(id){
      //do something, e.g:  doSomethingElse('bob');
    }
    function doSomethingElse(str){
      //some code
    }
    $.fn.myMethod = function() {
      return this.each(function(){
        doSomething(jQuery(this).attr("id"));
      });   
    };
})(jQuery);

Or another:

(function($) { 
    var me = {
        doSomething: function(id){
         //do something, e.g:  this.doSomethingElse('bob');
        },
        doSomethingElse: function(str){
          //some code
        }
    };
    $.fn.myMethod = function() {
      return this.each(function(){
        me.doSomething(jQuery(this).attr("id"));
      });   
    };
})(jQuery);

Related articles:

share|improve this answer
    
@nick: having only one huge function and 0 code reuse is fairly bad imho. Especially since I call doSomethingElse() in 3 or 4 different places in doSomething(). –  marcgg Jun 10 '10 at 13:58
    
@marcgg: Your example doesn't show that...you should give more clues about your usage if that's the case, even hinting these will be used for multiple plugins would be a start. –  Nick Craver Jun 10 '10 at 13:59
    
@nick I'll update my example right now –  marcgg Jun 10 '10 at 14:00
1  
It's easy to check. var f = function() { function g() {}; return g; }; var g1 = f(), g2 = f(); alert(g1 === g2); If Nick is right, you'd expect true, if I'm correct you'd expect false. Guess which it is :) –  Tim Down Jun 10 '10 at 14:31
1  
@Tim Down: In that case you're returning it outside the closure it's in, so of course it'd need a copy each time to expose it, I'm not sure that's a valid test at all. To be clear, not saying you're wrong, just saying that test isn't a valid way to determine it. –  Nick Craver Jun 10 '10 at 14:34

There's nothing wrong with using a large function just to create a new scope. The following keeps doSomething and doSomethingElse private and avoids defining new doSomething and doSomethingElse functions for each invocation of myMethod, which is what would happen if you put doSomething and doSomethingElse inside myMethod's definition.

(function() {
  function doSomething(id) {
    // Something
  }

  function doSomethingElse() {
    // Something else
  }

  jQuery.fn.myMethod = function() {
    return this.each(function(){
      doSomething(this.id);
    });
  };
})();
share|improve this answer
    
Sorry but I'm not sure what you are trying to do here. Could you give an example of how this would be used? –  marcgg Jun 10 '10 at 14:02
    
The point is that doSomething and doSomethingElse are only accessible within the enclosing function, not outside. The example is the call to doSomething(this.id); within the definition of jQuery.fn.myMethod. Keeping the doSomething and doSomethingElse functions from being accessible to other code is what I thought you wanted and is what this achieves. Have I misunderstood the question? –  Tim Down Jun 10 '10 at 14:06
    
@tim: That's pretty cool, thanks! I'm not really familiar with this ( function(){})(); syntax, is there any documentation on what this will do? –  marcgg Jun 10 '10 at 14:10
    
@marcgg: blog.morrisjohns.com/javascript_closures_for_dummies.html No offense meant by the name, but it's a good closure learning reference. –  Nick Craver Jun 10 '10 at 14:12
    
marcgg: It's commonly referred to as the Module Pattern. If you Google for it, there's plenty of references. This one looks reasonable: adequatelygood.com/2010/3/JavaScript-Module-Pattern-In-Depth –  Tim Down Jun 10 '10 at 14:22

I would put everything inside the jQuery.fn.myMethod function, to avoid possible namespace collisions, and make for cleaner code. This pattern also allows you to to make private methods which are not accessible from outside the myMethod function.

jQuery.fn.myMethod = function(options) {
  // Set up a "that" object, which can be referenced from anywhere inside this function
  var that = {};

  // If the plugin needs optional arguments, you can define them this way
  if (typeof(options) == 'undefined') options = {};
  that.options.option1 = options.option1 || 'default value 1';
  that.options.option2 = options.option2 || 'default value 2';

  that.init = function() {
    // psuedo-constructor method, called from end of function definition
  }

  that.doSomething = function() {
    // something
  }

  that.doSomethingElse = function() {
    // something else
  } 

  // Call init method once all methods are defined
  that.init();

  // Return the matched elements, to allow method chaining
  return jQuery(this);
}
share|improve this answer
    
that is pretty interesting, do you know if it's a common practice? –  marcgg Jun 10 '10 at 13:59
    
What's the point of that? You could use local variables instead of an object with properties. –  Tim Down Jun 10 '10 at 14:02
    
I think so, at least among my colleagues and I. I've seen plenty of jQuery plugins written this way also, or at least some variation of this. –  Harold1983- Jun 10 '10 at 14:03
    
The point of the "that" object is to avoid possible namespace collisions. For example, if I had just called my methods init(), doSomething(), and doSomethingElse(), I risk accidentally calling a global function by the same name. While this is unlikely, it's still one less thing to worry about. Also, you can pass the "that" object to callback methods, giving them access to the current scope. –  Harold1983- Jun 10 '10 at 14:06
    
@harold1983: any example out there? –  marcgg Jun 10 '10 at 14:07

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