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Here's some JavaScript:

linkElem.click(function () {
    var data = linkElem.data();
    alert(''+data.mls + ' ' + data.id);
});

It works.

linkElem is a local variable that I create in a loop inside a function. I assign some data to it with jQuery's .data(). If I did not call .click(), linkElem would be reassigned during the loop and then recycled after the function returns. However, I have created an anonymous function which references linkElem. So I am no longer sure what is going on.

My guess is that all of the anonymous functions and linkElems created during the loop are given UIDs of some kind and moved to persistent/global scope. Is this correct? Gratuitous detail would be much appreciated.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Yes, your description is pretty close. The local storage for a Javascript function call is just a block of memory allocated for local variables. If you "capture" that by creating another function inside a called function, then the storage is retained and the local variables carry on with their lives, unaware that the function that gave them birth might be long dead.

It's important to keep in mind that only functions create such storage — things like brace-enclosed loop bodies are not separate storage areas. Thus a common error is to declare a variable in a function and re-use it among several functions created in a loop. That's not inherently wrong, but the effect can be surprising:

function whatever() {
  for (var i = 0; i < 3; ++i) {
    setTimeout(function() { alert(i); }, 5000);
  }
}

If you run that, you'll see three alerts that all say "3". Why? Because they all share the same "i" variable. You can avoid that by introducing another function layer:

function whatever() {
  for (var i = 0; i < 3; ++i) {
    setTimeout((function(private_i) { return function() { alert(private_i); }; })(i), 5000);
  }
}

The "wrapper" function is just there to provide a local variable (the parameter "private_i") whereto the loop variable "i" can be copied.

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However, I have created an anonymous function which references linkElem. So I am no longer sure what is going on.

It still gets reassigned, unless you are wrapping it in another level of scope (NB: another function).

Consider the following:

for (var j = 0;j < 10;j += 1) {
    arrayOfLinks[j].onclick = function () {
        alert(j);
    };
}

In this case, all of those links would alert 10 when clicked, because j is outside of the scope and is being updated.

If you're creating linkElem in the same way, you are likely to only get the result of the last linkElem in the loop.

This is a better way:

linkElem.click(function () {
    var data = $(this).data(); // no longer dependent on `linkElem` reference
    alert(''+data.mls + ' ' + data.id);
});
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Please refer to this How do JavaScript closures work? This may help you understanding closures.

Whenever you see the function keyword within another function, the inner function has access to variables in the outer function.

function foo(x) {
  var tmp = 3;
  function bar(y) {
    alert(x + y + (++tmp));
  }
  bar(10);
}
foo(2)

This will always alert 16, because bar can access the x which was defined as an argument to foo, and it can also access tmp from foo.

That is a closure. A function doesn't have to return in order to be called a closure. Simply accessing variables outside of your immediate lexical scope creates a closure.

function foo(x) {
  var tmp = 3;
  return function (y) {
    alert(x + y + (++tmp));
  }
}
var bar = foo(2); // bar is now a closure.
bar(10);

The above function will also alert 16, because bar can still refer to x and tmp, even though it is no longer directly inside the scope.

However, since tmp is still hanging around inside bar's closure, it is also being incremented. It will be incremented each time you call bar.

The simplest example of a closure is this:

var a = 10;
function test() {
  console.log(a); // will output 10
  console.log(b); // will output 6
}
var b = 6;
test();

When a Javascript function is invoked, a new execution context is created. Together with the function arguments and the parent object, this execution context also receives all the variables declared outside of it (in the above example, both 'a' and 'b').

It is possible to create more than one closure function, either by returning a list of them or by setting them to global variables. All of these will refer to the same x and the same tmp, they don't make their own copies.

[you]: Fascinating, tell me more!

Here the number x is a literal number. As with other literals in JavaScript, when foo is called, the number x is copied into foo as its argument x.

On the other hand, JavaScript always uses references when dealing with Objects. If say, you called foo with an Object, the closure it returns will reference that original Object!

function foo(x) {
  var tmp = 3;
  return function (y) {
    alert(x + y + tmp);
    x.memb = x.memb ? x.memb + 1 : 1;
    alert(x.memb);
  }
}
var age = new Number(2);
var bar = foo(age); // bar is now a closure referencing age.
bar(10);

As expected, each call to bar(10) will increment x.memb. What might not be expected, is that x is simply referring to the same object as the age variable! After a couple of calls to bar, age.memb will be 2! This referencing is the basis for memory leaks with HTML objects.

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