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I have a query that's used in a reporting system of ours that sometimes runs quicker than a second, and other times takes 1 to 10 minutes to run.

Here's the entry from the slow query log:

# Query_time: 543  Lock_time: 0  Rows_sent: 0  Rows_examined: 124948974
use statsdb;
SELECT count(distinct Visits.visitorid) as 'uniques'
 FROM Visits,Visitors
 WHERE Visits.visitorid=Visitors.visitorid
     and candidateid in (32)
     and visittime>=1275721200 and visittime<=1275807599 
     and (omit=0 or omit>=1275807599) 
     AND Visitors.segmentid=9 
     AND Visits.visitorid NOT IN 
         (SELECT Visits.visitorid 
          FROM Visits,Visitors 
          WHERE Visits.visitorid=Visitors.visitorid
              and candidateid in (32) 
              and visittime<1275721200 
              and (omit=0 or omit>=1275807599) 
              AND Visitors.segmentid=9);

It's basically counting unique visitors, and it's doing that by counting the visitors for today and then substracting those that have been here before. If you know of a better way to do this, let me know.

I just don't understand why sometimes it can be so quick, and other times takes so long - even with the same exact query under the same server load.

Here's the EXPLAIN on this query. As you can see it's using the indexes I've set up:

id  select_type table   type    possible_keys   key key_len ref rows    Extra
1   PRIMARY Visits  range   visittime_visitorid,visitorid   visittime_visitorid 4   NULL    82500   Using where; Using index
1   PRIMARY Visitors    eq_ref  PRIMARY,cand_visitor_omit   PRIMARY 8   statsdb.Visits.visitorid    1   Using where
2   DEPENDENT SUBQUERY  Visits  ref visittime_visitorid,visitorid   visitorid   8   func    1   Using where
2   DEPENDENT SUBQUERY  Visitors    eq_ref  PRIMARY,cand_visitor_omit   PRIMARY 8   statsdb.Visits.visitorid    1   Using where

I tried to optimize the query a few weeks ago and came up with a variation that consistently took about 2 seconds, but in practice it ended up taking more time since 90% of the time the old query returned much quicker. Two seconds per query is too long because we are calling the query up to 50 times per page load, with different time periods.

Could the quick behavior be due to the query being saved in the query cache? I tried running 'RESET QUERY CACHE' and 'FLUSH TABLES' between my benchmark tests and I was still getting quick results most of the time.

Note: last night while running the query I got an error: Unable to save result set. My initial research shows that may be due to a corrupt table that needs repair. Could this be the reason for the behavior I'm seeing?

In case you want server info:

  • Accessing via PHP 4.4.4 MySQL 4.1.22
  • All tables are InnoDB
  • We run optimize table on all tables weekly
  • The sum of both the tables used in the query is 500 MB

MySQL config:

key_buffer              = 350M
max_allowed_packet      = 16M
thread_stack            = 128K
sort_buffer             = 14M
read_buffer             = 1M
bulk_insert_buffer_size = 400M
set-variable = max_connections=150
query_cache_limit       = 1048576
query_cache_size        = 50777216
query_cache_type        = 1
tmp_table_size          = 203554432
table_cache             = 120
thread_cache_size       = 4
wait_timeout            = 28800
skip-external-locking
innodb_file_per_table
innodb_buffer_pool_size = 3512M
innodb_log_file_size=100M
innodb_log_buffer_size=4M

Here's the structure, Bill:

CREATE TABLE `Visitors` (
  `visitorid` bigint(20) unsigned NOT NULL auto_increment,
  `ip` int(11) unsigned default '0',
  `candidateid` int(11) unsigned NOT NULL default '0',
  `omit` int(11) unsigned NOT NULL default '0',
  `segmentid` int(10) unsigned NOT NULL default '0',
  PRIMARY KEY  (`visitorid`),
  KEY `cand_visitor_omit` (`candidateid`,`visitorid`,`omit`),
  KEY `ip_omit` (`ip`,`omit`)
) ENGINE=InnoDB DEFAULT CHARSET=latin1 AUTO_INCREMENT=2837988 ;

CREATE TABLE `Visits` (
  `visitid` bigint(20) unsigned NOT NULL auto_increment,
  `visitorid` bigint(20) unsigned NOT NULL default '0',
  `visittime` int(11) unsigned NOT NULL default '0',
  `converted` tinyint(4) NOT NULL default '0',
  `superconverted` tinyint(4) NOT NULL default '0',
  `clickedotheroffer` tinyint(4) NOT NULL default '0',
  PRIMARY KEY  (`visitid`),
  KEY `visittime_visitorid` (`visittime`,`visitorid`),
  KEY `visitorid` (`visitorid`)
) ENGINE=InnoDB DEFAULT CHARSET=latin1 AUTO_INCREMENT=3912081 ;
share|improve this question
    
Can you add the output of SHOW CREATE TABLE for each table Visits and Visitors? I can't tell from your example query which column goes with which table. –  Bill Karwin Jun 10 '10 at 17:45
    
Updated, Bill - sorry should have included that originally –  Shane N Jun 10 '10 at 17:50
    
Thanks. I wonder why you have 350M key_buffer_size if you're not using MyISAM? –  Bill Karwin Jun 10 '10 at 18:43
    
There are other applications on the server that are using MyISAM. Does anything else jump out at you? I think I need to consult our sysadmin... –  Shane N Jun 10 '10 at 18:47
    
You have 50M allocated to your query cache. Could this explain the irregular performance? That is, sometimes the query has to run the hard way, sometimes it can re-use a result from the query cache. Unfortunately, it's hard to know if a specific query benefited from the query cache. –  Bill Karwin Jun 10 '10 at 18:59
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4 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The answer from @OMG Ponies is close to what I was thinking when I asked for your table definitions. Basically, you only need one instance of Visitors in this query.

A given Visitor who has some matching visits in the time period and no matching visits earlier than the time period should be counted:

SELECT COUNT(DISTINCT v.visitorid) AS unique_visitor_count
FROM Visitors v
JOIN Visits current ON v.visitorid = current.visitorid
    AND current.visittime BETWEEN 1275721200 AND 1275807599
LEFT JOIN Visits earlier ON v.visitorid = earlier.visitorid
    AND earlier.visittime < 1275721200
WHERE v.candidateid IN (32)
  AND v.segmentid = 9
  AND v.omit NOT BETWEEN 1 AND 1275807598
  AND earlier.visitorid IS NULL;

You might benefit from an index on Visitors(candidateid,segmentid,omit), since those columns are used in your WHERE clause. You could also try an index on Visitors(visitorid,candidateid,segmentid,omit).

Basically if you can get the query optimization to say using index it means it's getting all the data it needs from the index data structure and it won't have to read the table data at all!


I tried out the query above with a few tries at indexes. The indexes I suggested above didn't help, it still wants to use the cand_visitor_omit index for Visitors. But I changed the visittime_visitorid index on Visits by reversing the columns:

CREATE INDEX visitorid_visittime ON Visits(visitorid, visittime);

This got the optimization plan to tell me it was going to use this as a covering index for both joins to Visits (see "Using index" in the extra field at the right):

+----+-------------+---------+------+---------------------------+---------------------+---------+------------------+------+--------------------------------------+
| id | select_type | table   | type | possible_keys             | key                 | key_len | ref              | rows | Extra                                |
+----+-------------+---------+------+---------------------------+---------------------+---------+------------------+------+--------------------------------------+
|  1 | SIMPLE      | v       | ref  | PRIMARY,cand_visitor_omit | cand_visitor_omit   | 4       | const            |    1 | Using where                          |
|  1 | SIMPLE      | current | ref  | visitorid_visittime       | visitorid_visittime | 8       | test.v.visitorid |    2 | Using where; Using index             |
|  1 | SIMPLE      | earlier | ref  | visitorid_visittime       | visitorid_visittime | 8       | test.v.visitorid |    2 | Using where; Using index; Not exists |
+----+-------------+---------+------+---------------------------+---------------------+---------+------------------+------+--------------------------------------+

Changing the index in this way also makes your other single-column index on Visitors(visitorid) redundant, so you can drop that one.

share|improve this answer
    
Wow Bill - never thought I'd get such a thorough answer on here. At first test your query took .5 seconds...incredible improvement. Gonna integrate your suggestions and see how it performs in production. Thanks so much! –  Shane N Jun 10 '10 at 19:27
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Here's my re-write of your query:

   SELECT COUNT(DISTINCT v.visitorid) AS uniques
     FROM VISITS v
     JOIN VISITORS vv ON vv.visitorid = v.visitorid
                     AND vv.segmentid = 9
LEFT JOIN VISTS pv ON pv.visitorid = v.visitorid
                  AND pv.visitorid = vv.visitorid
                  AND pv.candidateid = v.candidateid
                  AND pv.visittime < 1275721200
                  AND v.omit NOT BETWEEN 1 AND 1275807598
    WHERE x.visitorid IS NULL
      AND v.candidateid = 32
      AND v.visittime BETWEEN 1275721200 AND 1275807599
      AND v.omit NOT BETWEEN 1 AND 1275807598

Two seconds per query is too long because we are calling the query up to 50 times per page load, with different time periods.


Why on earth would you run the same query that many times for a page? It should be run once - you need to define a GROUP BY clause appropriate for the data to return a count for each of these. My assumption is the group by should be by candidateid...

share|improve this answer
1  
Thanks for the input, Ponies (haha nice name). It's getting "Unknown column 'v.candidateid' in 'where clause'", but I think your other point is probably the heart of the issue. The way things are coded we make a query for each row in the report we're showing. It's clean from an OO point of view, but definitely not best in terms of performance. Is it possible to group by multiple fields, such as candidateid and the time bucket? –  Shane N Jun 10 '10 at 18:17
    
@Shane N: Yep, you can group by multiple fields in the GROUP BY clause. –  OMG Ponies Jun 10 '10 at 18:30
1  
This is why clean from an OO point of view is bad design in datbases terms. You need to design differently for databases. OOP principles do not apply, you need to think interms of sets of data not individual rows. –  HLGEM Jun 10 '10 at 19:00
    
Yup - gonna try and squeeze as much as we can out of optimizing this query, but i'm sure in a matter of time we'll be redesigning exactly how you say. Thanks! –  Shane N Jun 10 '10 at 19:25
    
'Clean OO design' doesn't preclude having a dataset, page or calculation context where you can cooperatively cache, sum or pass data between rows. Rows don't exist in a vacuum. If your biz logic has such a concept -- which it probably does -- you can surely do it in OO. –  Thomas W Sep 10 '13 at 2:46
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A query like this may perform better:

SELECT count(distinct v.visitorid) as 'uniques' 
FROM Visits v
inner join Visitors vr on v.visitorid = vr.visitorid 
left outer join (
    SELECT v1.visitorid  
    FROM Visits v1
    inner join Visitors v2 on v1.visitorid = v2.visitorid
    WHERE candidateid = 32  
        and visittime < 1275721200  
        and (omit = 0 or omit >= 1275807599)  
        and v2.segmentid = 9
    ) vo on v.visitorid = vo.visitorid 
where candidateid = 32
    and visittime between 1275721200 and 1275807599  
    and (omit = 0 or omit >= 1275807599)  
    and vr.segmentid = 9  
    and vo.visitorid is null
share|improve this answer
    
Wow Red, you're quick! And without even seeing the schema too...impressive! When running that query I get: an error "Unknown table 'v' in field list" Is v out of scope? I'm gonna try and play around with it, but can you explain why this left join is better than a subselect? –  Shane N Jun 10 '10 at 18:02
    
I updated the query, try again. Joins usually perform better than sub-selects, as the query engine is generally optimized for that. Not always though! Give it a try... –  RedFilter Jun 10 '10 at 18:06
    
Now "Unknown table 'vr' in where clause". But good to know about joins. If I remember correctly, the attempt I made a few weeks ago actually used a similar approach. I think I may just end up taking the consistent 2 second query as opposed to relying on whatever inconsistent magic is making the current query quick most of the time. Thanks for the tips Red! –  Shane N Jun 10 '10 at 18:13
    
Fixed the error, try again! –  RedFilter Jun 10 '10 at 18:20
    
Awesome, Red. Upon first test it dropped the query down to about 1.5 seconds - sweet! Gonna run some more tests, but thanks so much! –  Shane N Jun 10 '10 at 19:24
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If your question is "why it is fast some times" then I'm pretty sure the answer is query cache. When you run this query for the first time it works longer but then it stores the result in cache. And then it simply returns results from cache unless the data set is changed or cache itself expires. Did you consider this option at all?

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, that's what I originally thought, but there are 2 things that make me think otherwise: 1) I still see fast behavior sometimes even immediately after I clear the query cache with RESET QUERY CACHE and FLUSH TABLES 2) I still see fast behavior when brand new variations of the query are used. Example - I'd run the query, then run it again with visittimes that are changed ever so slightly (and I know that haven't been used before). It's my understanding that MySQL would see this as a brand new query and execute it from scratch...am I wrong? –  Shane N Jun 10 '10 at 17:54
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