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I'm learning C++ and I want to make clean and readable code. I was wondering which way is better? (this is supposed to make the factorial of 9)

First Method:

int main(){
    int i = 1,r = i;
    while (i < 10) {
       r *= ++i;
    }
}

Second Method:

int main(){
    int i = 1,r = i;
    while (i < 10) {
       i++;
       r *= i
    }
}

The first may be harder to understand but it's one less line. Is it worth it? What about performance? Obviously it wouldn't matter in such a trivial example but it would be a good practice to make fast code from the beginning.

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3  
It's r *= i not r* = i!. –  KennyTM Jun 10 '10 at 18:55
5  
re programming fast from the beginning: premature optimization is the root of all evil and many bugs. –  tloach Jun 10 '10 at 18:58
1  
You're short some semicolons and a closing brace, while you're at it. –  Grumdrig Jun 10 '10 at 18:59
12  
The compiler doesn't care how many lines you use. A few extra minutes typing to add clarity will save hours and days of debugging in the future. –  Thomas Matthews Jun 10 '10 at 19:01
1  
Yep. You shouldn't be trying to outsmart your compiler unless you have a positive reason to do so. –  Cogwheel Jun 10 '10 at 19:16

12 Answers 12

That while can't get much simpler, but you can always switch to a for!

int r = 1;

for (int i = 1; i <= 10; i++) {
   r *= i;
}
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2  
r is uninitialized. –  Neil Williams Jun 10 '10 at 18:57
4  
@jboyd: it won't throw an exception, r will just have garbage in it. –  Ferruccio Jun 10 '10 at 19:00
2  
for is good, meaningful names are good too. –  msw Jun 10 '10 at 19:05
1  
Postfix increment is unnecessary, always use prefix as long as you do not needs the copy from the postfix. But +1 for using for, much more readable IMO. –  daramarak Jun 10 '10 at 19:09
1  
@wds prefix is not about optimization, it is about reducing side effects. –  daramarak Jun 16 '10 at 8:46
int factorial(int n) {
   int product = 1;
   for (int i = 1; i <= n; i++) {
      product *= i;
   }
   return product;
}

is way more readable (and generalized).

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4  
Indeed. Code should be written for people first and for computers second. –  Instance Hunter Jun 10 '10 at 19:25
3  
I would like to give this a +10, if I only could. I hadn't even seen that that code is an iterative factorial, which just shows that names are very relevant. –  sbi Jun 10 '10 at 20:42
    
i like this the most though I voted for both of the for loop ones, the variable names here are clearer and this is a better example of what one should do on the job. –  Cervo Jun 10 '10 at 23:01
    
This one is better than LukeN's. –  Matthieu M. Jun 11 '10 at 6:52
    
It's basically the same except I didn't wrap it in a function and left the name "j" the keep it similar to OP's code :) –  LukeN Jun 11 '10 at 8:08

The second one, no doubt.

Mainly because if you're debugging the code, you always suspect the line r *= ++i; to be errorous.

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Personally, of the two, I'd use the first one; it's readable and clear. If you were to use the second one, use the prefix increment (++i) on the standalone line anyway; it's slightly faster (ignoring potential compiler optimizations) in the general case.

Also, I'd probably use a for loop in this case -- I'm assuming there's a reason you're not.

There's not a good general rule for this -- if the line had more operations in it and function calls etc, it'd start being too complex. You get a good feel for complexity vs brevity as you get more experience.

And finally, I wouldn't worry about micro optimizations like this as you code, especially if you're just learning.

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thanks, I feared that 1st one was not so readable, and a for is a good idea, my book just used a while thats why I posted like that. –  user363834 Jun 10 '10 at 19:04
1  
Cory, ++i is prefix increment, since the operator is prefixing the operand. i++ is postfix increment. Otherwise a very good point, +1 from me. . Most start with using i++ on int and forget that this might hurt performance when i is some user-defined type. –  sbi Jun 10 '10 at 20:39
    
Thanks for fixing my typo; that's what I get for mind-dumping random advice between compiles. :) –  Cory Petosky Jun 14 '10 at 17:37
1  
I would say that the most important point about the prefix increment is not optimization but good style and reduction of side effects. When using postfix you create a copy. –  daramarak Jun 16 '10 at 10:15
int main(){ 
   int i = 1,r = i; 
   while (i++ < 10) { 
      r *= i;
   } 

And forgetting some semi colons.

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You could go a little more compact even...

int main() {
  int i = 10, r = 1;
  while (--i) r *= i;
}

not that that's really a good idea.

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Not if you want to maintain that code! –  LukeN Jun 10 '10 at 19:06

As others has pointed out, try not to write 'smart code' but 'understandable code'. The solution given by msw is very good because the names of the variables shows what its purpose is.

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int main()
{
    int answer = factorial(10);
}

int factorial(int n)
{
    if (n == 1) return 1;
    return n * factorial(n-1);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Totally impractical but still I didn't see any other recursive versions. Now we just need someone to make a tail recursive version of it :) +1 –  Cervo Jun 10 '10 at 22:59

Why not fold the intended number in the while loop? Main thing for me is code readability because someone else is going to come back later and have to figure it out. Also, factorial's get really big fast, so you might want to use a long. Try to use the best type for the job.

long main() {
    return factorial( 10 );
}

long factorial( int n ) {
    long ans = (long) n;

    // error checking here
    if (n <= 0) { return -1; }
    while (n-- > 0) {
        ans *= n;
    }
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I think the other answers are better example of writing clear and readable code, but if you must have something that is very similar to the original code you posted, this might be a cleaner alternative.

int main(){
    int r, i = r = 1;
    while (i++ < 10) {
       r *= i;
    }
}

In my opinion, pre- and post-increment operators that are combined with assignments are one of the hardest code constructs to mentally parse. Pre- and post-increment in conditionals is a lot more common.

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1  
you have a bug compared to original code - your loop is longer, wrong use of ++ –  Greg Domjan Jun 10 '10 at 20:32
    
I fail to see how while (i++ < 10) is any clearer than i *= ++i; –  Robert Tuck Jun 10 '10 at 22:30
    
@Greg: Fixed a declaration bug, but the loops are identical. I just compiled and ran them both to be sure. –  Lucas Jun 11 '10 at 2:58

Method #1, up to limitations of some debugging tools.

Compact code should be preferred, the problem is that you cannot debug aggregate statements on many of the popular cheap debugging tools. This often make you break long expressions, extract variables, etc.

In case of simple code as this one, compactness really outweights. You can see some of the motivation here: http://steve-yegge.blogspot.com/2008/02/portrait-of-n00b.html

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prefer ++i to i++

++i increments and gives back the new value i++ is doing 2 steps, creating a temp, incrementing the value and returning the temp old value

As such in general usage where you can use ++i the code will be simpler to understand. Both your examples can use ++i so there is little difference.

prefer for to while when you have simple loops similar to for each.

for (int i = 2, r=1; i <= 10; ++i) {
  r *= i
}
share|improve this answer
    
The compiler will optimize away the temporaries if it can with i++, so this is a pretty out of date argument. And then you went and used i== in your own for loop, so -1 from me. –  John Dibling Jun 11 '10 at 14:18
1  
quite right, poor typing habbit ++i it should have been. The Compile MIGHT optimise out temporaries, or have little cost, my argument is not compiler speed but comprehension of purpose. –  Greg Domjan Jun 11 '10 at 17:52
    
I don't really think anyone has any trouble understanding i++ as the last clause in a for loop. Some of us do have trouble understanding why you've declared r in the scope of the loop though, so once the loop is over you can't return it. –  Peter Jun 13 '10 at 22:39
1  
uhm, return r from main? well I guess if there was more to the example than doing something with r then discarding any result it might matter more, but as it is only used inside the loop I reduced the scope. And see Johns response above for an easy example of how i++ can easily be used incorrectly. –  Greg Domjan Jun 14 '10 at 19:24

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