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I need to bea be able to use a static variable set in a class that extends a base class... from the base class.

Consider this:

class Animal {
    public static $color = 'black';

    public static function get_color()
    {
        return self::$color;
    }
}

class Dog extends Animal {
    public static $color = 'brown';
}

echo Animal::get_color(); // prints 'black'
echo Dog::get_color(); // also prints 'black'

This works wonderfully in PHP 5.3.x (Dog::get_color() prints 'brown') since it has late static binding. But my production server runs PHP 5.2.11 and so I need to adapt my script.

Is there a somewhat pretty workaround to solve this issue?

Cheers!
Christoffer

EDIT: The goal

As noted below, this is a very much simplified example of what I am trying to accomplish. If I provide you with the two options I have used to solve my problem (and the problem itself) someone might have a different solution than I...

I have built a base database model that contains functions like "find", "find_by" and "find_all" (all static).

In PHP 5.3 there is a function called get_called_class() which I currently use to determine the called class's name, and then use it to map against the correct database table. Ex class User would point to users.

get_called_class() doesn't exist in PHP 5.2.x and the hack implementations I've found are very unreliable. Then I turned to this option of using a static variable in all model classes which contain the class name.

share|improve this question
1  
I assume Dog should extend Animal? –  Richard JP Le Guen Jun 10 '10 at 19:41
    
You are absolutely right :) –  Christoffer Jun 10 '10 at 19:42
1  
With the further explaining, I think you should put your find/find by functions as methods on a table class rather than statics on a row class (which is what it sounds like you're trying –  gnarf Jun 11 '10 at 16:29
    
Gnarf: Yes, that's what I came up with late last night as well. It's not as pretty but it'll do. –  Christoffer Jun 12 '10 at 8:50

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Sadly, before PHP 5.3 there's no way to simulate late static binding. The only way you can get the inheritance to work as you intend is if those are instance variables and methods.

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Which means I cannot use static methods to create the objects themselves? –  Christoffer Jun 10 '10 at 19:38
1  
Not if you're relying on static data stored in subclasses, no. –  VoteyDisciple Jun 10 '10 at 20:19

I ran into this problem when subclassing something in the Zend Framework. My determination was that in purely static land, you only have one option... Redefine the function in the inheriting class:

class Animal {
    public static $color = 'black';

    public static function get_color()
    {
        return self::$color;
    }
}

class Dog extends Animal {
    public static $color = 'brown';

    public static function get_color() 
    {
      return self::$color;
    }
}

If you are able to create instances - You can use get_class($this) to find out the calling class, for example:

class Animal {
    public static $color = 'black';

    public function getColor() // note, not static
    {
      $class = get_class($this);
      return $class::$color;
    }
}

class Dog extends Animal {
    public static $color = 'brown';
}

$animal = new Animal();
echo $animal->getColor(); // prints 'black'
$dog = new Dog();
echo $dog->getColor(); // prints 'brown'

The only other option I thought of was using a function parameter to the static function to define a class it was being called from. It can default to __CLASS__ and then you can return parent::get_class($class) from the subclass. A pattern like this could be used to make re-using the static function easier (as I doubt returning a public static property is the only thing you are trying to use self:: for in that static method:

class Animal {
    public static $color = 'black';

    public static function get_color($class = __CLASS__)
    {
        // Super Simple Example Case... I imagine this function to be more complicated
        return $class::$color;
    }
}

class Dog extends Animal {
    public static $color = 'brown';

    public static function get_color($class = __CLASS__)
    {
      return parent::get_color($class);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for your answer. It works in the example I provided, but the actual case is quite a bit more complicated. I edit my post to tell you what I actually want to do and hopefully there might be very different angles than the ones I've tried. –  Christoffer Jun 11 '10 at 6:07

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