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This seems pretty simple and maybe I'm just overlooking the proper flag, but how would I, in one command, copy a file from one directory to another and rename it in the destination directory? Here's my command:

if exist "bin\development\whee.config.example"
  if not exist "TestConnectionExternal\bin\Debug\whee.config"
    xcopy "bin\development\whee.config.example"
          "TestConnectionExternal\bin\Debug\whee.config"

It prompts me with the following every time:

Does TestConnectionExternal\bin\Debug\whee.config specify a file name or directory name on the target (F = file, D = directory)?

I want to suppress this prompt; the answer is always F.

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13 Answers

up vote 83 down vote accepted

Don't use the xcopy, use copy instead, it doesn't have this issue.

xcopy is generally used when performing recursive copies of multiple files/folders, or when you need the verification/prompting features it offers. For single file copies, the copy command works just fine.

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24  
copy will not copy the file if the entire directory structure for the destination doesn't already exist. xcopy will automatically create all needed directories. –  BQ. Jun 21 '11 at 15:14
14  
It's amazing that xcopy has this omission. If it simply had an option for files like it has for directories (/I), this would be solved and xcopy could be a great replacement for copy. Instead, due to this defect, you have to choose copy for these situations. –  Rocketmonkeys Aug 12 '11 at 15:15
    
copy worked fine in my case because the destination directory structure exists, so I didn't need that feature of xcopy. –  Sarah Vessels Mar 20 '12 at 17:09
6  
As others have already pointed out, @Arnshea's answer is the correct one. This is because a) the OP's particular circumstance of already having the directory structure in place was not mentioned in the question, and b) it is far more valuable for future readers of this question who will come here looking for an answer regarding xcopy and not just copy. –  Mike Nakis Sep 4 '12 at 7:33
2  
Well @Amshea's answer is also the correct one because the question is specific to xcopy, and this answer is basically "don't use xcopy". Doesn't really answer the question about xcopy at all, now does it? –  BrainSlugs83 Feb 3 '13 at 2:54
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Back to the original question:

 xcopy "bin\development\whee.config.example" "TestConnectionExternal\bin\Debug\whee.config"

could be done with two commands eg:

mkdir "c:\mybackup\TestConnectionExternal\bin\Debug\whee.config\.."
xcopy "bin\development\whee.config.example" "c:\mybackup\TestConnectionExternal\bin\Debug\whee.config"

By simply appending "\.." to the path of the destination file the destination diretctory is created if it not already exists. In this case

"c:\mybackup\TestConnectionExternal\bin\Debug\"

which is the parent directory of the non exsiting direcory

"c:\mybackup\TestConnectionExternal\bin\Debug\whee.config\.."

At least for WIN7 mkdir does not care if the directoy

"c:\mybackup\TestConnectionExternal\bin\Debug\whee.config\"

really exists.

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This is from Bills answer.

Just to be really clear for others.

If you are copying ONE file from one place to another AND you want the full directory structure to be created, use the following command:

xcopy "C:\Data\Images\2013\08\12\85e4a707-2672-481b-92fb-67ecff20c96b.jpg" "C:\Target Data\\Images\2013\08\12\85e4a707-2672-481b-92fb-67ecff20c96b.jpg\" 

Yes, put a backslash at the end of the file name and it will NOT ask you if it's a file or directory. Because there is only ONE file in the source, it will assume it's a file.

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Just go to http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb491035.aspx

Here's what the MAIN ISSUE is "... If Destination does not contain an existing directory and does not end with a backslash (), the following message appears: ...

Does destination specify a file name or directory name on the target (F = file, D = directory)?

You can suppress this message by using the /i command-line option, which causes xcopy to assume that the destination is a directory if the source is more than one file or a directory.

Took me a while, but all it takes is RTFM.

Bill.

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This should be the top answer! Just to be really clear for others. If you are copying ONE file from one place to another AND you want the full directory structure to be created, use the following command: xcopy /"C:\Data\Images\2013\08\12\85e4a707-2672-481b-92fb-67ecff20c96b.jpg" "C:\Target Data\\Images\2013\08\12\85e4a707-2672-481b-92fb-67ecff20c96b.jpg\" . Yes, put a backslash at the end of the file name! –  adudley Aug 20 '13 at 8:02
    
Best answer. Not a work-around, like other "popular" answers. –  Christopher Bull Apr 14 at 8:36
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xcopy src dest /I

REM This assumes dest is a folder and will create it, if it doesnt exists

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Work Around, use ReName... and Name it some Cryptic Name, then ReName it to its Proper Name

C:

CD "C:\Users\Public\Documents\My Web Sites\AngelFire~Zoe\"

XCopy /D /I /V /Y "C:\Users\Public\Documents\My Web Sites\HostGator ~ ZoeBeans\cop.htm"

Ren "cop.htm" "christ-our-passover.htm"

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Since you're not actually changing the filename, you can take out the filename from the destination and there will be no questions.

xcopy bin\development\whee.config.example TestConnectionExternal\bin\Debug\  /Y

This approach works well when the destination directory is guaranteed to exist, and when the source may equally be a file or directory.

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1  
@downvoters: Why this answer could have been downvoted? In this context, the Debug directory is probably guaranteed to exist. –  Jirka Hanika May 14 '13 at 8:56
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I suggest robocopy instead of copy or xcopy. Used as command or in GUI on clients or servers. Tolerant of network pauses and you can choose to ignore file attributes when copying of copy by file attributes. Oh, and it supports multi-core machines so files are copied much faster in "parallel" with each other instead of sequentially. robocopy can be found on MS TechNet.

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Another option is to use a destination wildcard. Note that this only works if the source and destination filenames will be the same, so while this doesn't solve the OP's specific example, I thought it was worth sharing.

For example:

    xcopy /y "bin\development\whee.config.example" "TestConnectionExternal\bin\Debug\*" 

will create a copy of the file "whee.config.example" in the destination directory without prompting for file or directory.

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This worked great for me, thanks! –  vitaminjeff May 10 '13 at 17:15
1  
This should be the official answer, it works great and it's less hacky. –  Durden81 Jul 24 '13 at 13:52
    
The "echo f |" way is cool, but this avoids the extra output that I often search for to find problems in the first place. –  Richard Hein Mar 11 at 22:27
    
@Durden81 - as zippycoder points out, their answer does not rename the file, which was a requirement of the OP. –  ShellShock May 29 at 15:25
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So, there is a simple fix for this. It is admittedly awkward, but it works. xcopy will not prompt to find out if the destination is a directory or file IF the new file(filename) already exists. If you precede your xcopy command with a simple echo to the new filename, it will overwrite the empty file. Example

echo.>newfile.txt
xcopy oldfile.txt newfile.txt /Y
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Use copy instead of xcopy when copying files.

e.g. copy "bin\development\whee.config.example" "TestConnectionExternal\bin\Debug\whee.config"

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I am trying to copy a file to the same folder with a different name and xcopy cannot work. I use copy /Y source destination to pass the overwrite confirmation. –  SandRock Jun 16 at 17:37
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I use

echo f | xcopy /f /y srcfile destfile

to get around it.

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1  
@Arnshea - thanks! Adapted for silent directory copy echo d | xcopy srcdirectory destdirectory /S –  Dr. ABT Jan 22 '12 at 20:27
1  
+1 @Arnshea it took me some time to understand what you are exactly doing there and since im working on a german windows installation its echo d | xcopy ... for me. You are brilliant –  Thomas May 25 '12 at 7:17
7  
He's simulating a user response to the question that xcopy will ask. –  John Munsch Aug 15 '12 at 18:13
2  
@Thomas Does that imply that a batch file that uses this technique won't be portable across different locales? –  Max Nanasy Oct 4 '12 at 0:20
7  
@MaxNanasy I confirmed that this is not portable across locales. In a german setup, you pass in D for a file or V for a directory. :( –  Matt Dec 13 '12 at 21:44
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You cannot specify that it's always a file. If you don't need xcopy's other features, why not just use regular copy?

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1  
One reason is that copy, being an internal command, doesn't set ErrorLevel. If you want to be able to influence the path of a batch file if a copy error occurs, you need to use XCOPY. –  rossmcm Jul 7 '11 at 2:48
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