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I am looking for color space converter from RGB to HSV, specifically for the range 0 to 255 for both color spaces.

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10  
What's wrong with looking up the closed formula at e.g. wikipedia and writing it down? –  zerm Jun 10 '10 at 20:41
3  
I don't understand some of the math –  Milo Jun 10 '10 at 20:47
4  
@user146780 You do not need to understand why this works to implement it. Beside that, the math is so simple - what exactly is hard to understand? –  zerm Jun 10 '10 at 20:51
1  
WHat's wrong with avoiding reinventing the wheel? –  Fukuzawa Yukio Aug 2 '13 at 20:59
2  
If you're going to complain that he didn't read the article at wikipedia, you could have at least posted the link :P –  eremzeit Oct 20 '13 at 20:55

8 Answers 8

I've used these for a long time - no idea where they came from at this point... I have tried multiple times to get this formatted properly but cannot seem to accomplish it.

    typedef struct {
    double r;       // percent
    double g;       // percent
    double b;       // percent
} rgb;

    typedef struct {
    double h;       // angle in degrees
    double s;       // percent
    double v;       // percent
} hsv;

    static hsv      rgb2hsv(rgb in);
    static rgb      hsv2rgb(hsv in);

hsv rgb2hsv(rgb in)
{
    hsv         out;
    double      min, max, delta;

    min = in.r < in.g ? in.r : in.g;
    min = min  < in.b ? min  : in.b;

    max = in.r > in.g ? in.r : in.g;
    max = max  > in.b ? max  : in.b;

    out.v = max;                                // v
    delta = max - min;
    if( max > 0.0 ) { // NOTE: if Max is == 0, this divide would cause a crash
        out.s = (delta / max);                  // s
    } else {
        // if max is 0, then r = g = b = 0              
            // s = 0, v is undefined
        out.s = 0.0;
        out.h = NAN;                            // its now undefined
        return out;
    }
    if( in.r >= max )                           // > is bogus, just keeps compilor happy
        out.h = ( in.g - in.b ) / delta;        // between yellow & magenta
    else
    if( in.g >= max )
        out.h = 2.0 + ( in.b - in.r ) / delta;  // between cyan & yellow
    else
        out.h = 4.0 + ( in.r - in.g ) / delta;  // between magenta & cyan

    out.h *= 60.0;                              // degrees

    if( out.h < 0.0 )
        out.h += 360.0;

    return out;
}


rgb hsv2rgb(hsv in)
{
    double      hh, p, q, t, ff;
    long        i;
    rgb         out;

    if(in.s <= 0.0) {       // < is bogus, just shuts up warnings
        out.r = in.v;
        out.g = in.v;
        out.b = in.v;
        return out;
    }
    hh = in.h;
    if(hh >= 360.0) hh = 0.0;
    hh /= 60.0;
    i = (long)hh;
    ff = hh - i;
    p = in.v * (1.0 - in.s);
    q = in.v * (1.0 - (in.s * ff));
    t = in.v * (1.0 - (in.s * (1.0 - ff)));

    switch(i) {
    case 0:
        out.r = in.v;
        out.g = t;
        out.b = p;
        break;
    case 1:
        out.r = q;
        out.g = in.v;
        out.b = p;
        break;
    case 2:
        out.r = p;
        out.g = in.v;
        out.b = t;
        break;

    case 3:
        out.r = p;
        out.g = q;
        out.b = in.v;
        break;
    case 4:
        out.r = t;
        out.g = p;
        out.b = in.v;
        break;
    case 5:
    default:
        out.r = in.v;
        out.g = p;
        out.b = q;
        break;
    }
    return out;     
}
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Curiosity is killing me. What is the point of the comments saying things such as: < is bogus, just shuts up warnings? –  Stargazer712 Jun 13 '13 at 18:06
2  
@Stargazer712 If you do the math,it should be ==, but if you use that you may get a complaint about comparing floats. While theoretically it's impossible for it to be >, using ">=" instead of "==" shuts down the compiler error that I get on the Mac using llvm/Xcode, –  David H Jun 13 '13 at 20:45
    
if(in.s <= 0.0) { if(isnan(in.h)) { out.r = in.v; out.g = in.v; out.b = in.v; return out; } // error - should never happen out.r = 0.0; out.g = 0.0; out.b = 0.0; return out; } This part of code is gives wrong results. When you have white rgb color and convert it to hsv and then back to rgb the result becomes black. rgb (1.0, 1.0, 1.0) translates to hsv as (0.0, 0.0, 1.0) and hsv 0.0 0.0 1.0 translates to rgb as (0.0, 0.0, 0.0) –  user65721 Aug 15 '13 at 11:33
    
corrected version of the that part is if(in.s <= 0.0) { out.r = in.v; out.g = in.v; out.b = in.v; return out; } –  user65721 Aug 15 '13 at 11:37
    
@user65721 thanks for catching and fixing this. I just updated the code. –  David H Aug 15 '13 at 20:43

You can also try this code without floats (faster but less accurate):

typedef struct RgbColor
{
    unsigned char r;
    unsigned char g;
    unsigned char b;
} RgbColor;

typedef struct HsvColor
{
    unsigned char h;
    unsigned char s;
    unsigned char v;
} HsvColor;

RgbColor HsvToRgb(HsvColor hsv)
{
    RgbColor rgb;
    unsigned char region, remainder, p, q, t;

    if (hsv.s == 0)
    {
        rgb.r = hsv.v;
        rgb.g = hsv.v;
        rgb.b = hsv.v;
        return rgb;
    }

    region = hsv.h / 43;
    remainder = (hsv.h - (region * 43)) * 6; 

    p = (hsv.v * (255 - hsv.s)) >> 8;
    q = (hsv.v * (255 - ((hsv.s * remainder) >> 8))) >> 8;
    t = (hsv.v * (255 - ((hsv.s * (255 - remainder)) >> 8))) >> 8;

    switch (region)
    {
        case 0:
            rgb.r = hsv.v; rgb.g = t; rgb.b = p;
            break;
        case 1:
            rgb.r = q; rgb.g = hsv.v; rgb.b = p;
            break;
        case 2:
            rgb.r = p; rgb.g = hsv.v; rgb.b = t;
            break;
        case 3:
            rgb.r = p; rgb.g = q; rgb.b = hsv.v;
            break;
        case 4:
            rgb.r = t; rgb.g = p; rgb.b = hsv.v;
            break;
        default:
            rgb.r = hsv.v; rgb.g = p; rgb.b = q;
            break;
    }

    return rgb;
}

HsvColor RgbToHsv(RgbColor rgb)
{
    HsvColor hsv;
    unsigned char rgbMin, rgbMax;

    rgbMin = rgb.r < rgb.g ? (rgb.r < rgb.b ? rgb.r : rgb.b) : (rgb.g < rgb.b ? rgb.g : rgb.b);
    rgbMax = rgb.r > rgb.g ? (rgb.r > rgb.b ? rgb.r : rgb.b) : (rgb.g > rgb.b ? rgb.g : rgb.b);

    hsv.v = rgbMax;
    if (hsv.v == 0)
    {
        hsv.h = 0;
        hsv.s = 0;
        return hsv;
    }

    hsv.s = 255 * long(rgbMax - rgbMin) / hsv.v;
    if (hsv.s == 0)
    {
        hsv.h = 0;
        return hsv;
    }

    if (rgbMax == rgb.r)
        hsv.h = 0 + 43 * (rgb.g - rgb.b) / (rgbMax - rgbMin);
    else if (rgbMax == rgb.g)
        hsv.h = 85 + 43 * (rgb.b - rgb.r) / (rgbMax - rgbMin);
    else
        hsv.h = 171 + 43 * (rgb.r - rgb.g) / (rgbMax - rgbMin);

    return hsv;
}
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1  
You can convert all 16,777,216 possible RGB colors to HSV and back again to RGB. Unfortunately, using this algorithm you will find that some colors will not roundtrip well. Perhaps they perceptually look about the same but numerically there is a substantial difference, e.g. (0, 237, 11) will roundtrip to (0, 237, 0) etc. This is not the case when using David H's algorithm based on floating point calculations. –  Martin Liversage Jul 23 '13 at 9:02

I wrote this in HLSL for our rendering engine, it has no conditions in it:

    float3  HSV2RGB( float3 _HSV )
    {
        _HSV.x = fmod( 100.0 + _HSV.x, 1.0 );                                       // Ensure [0,1[

        float   HueSlice = 6.0 * _HSV.x;                                            // In [0,6[
        float   HueSliceInteger = floor( HueSlice );
        float   HueSliceInterpolant = HueSlice - HueSliceInteger;                   // In [0,1[ for each hue slice

        float3  TempRGB = float3(   _HSV.z * (1.0 - _HSV.y),
                                    _HSV.z * (1.0 - _HSV.y * HueSliceInterpolant),
                                    _HSV.z * (1.0 - _HSV.y * (1.0 - HueSliceInterpolant)) );

        // The idea here to avoid conditions is to notice that the conversion code can be rewritten:
        //    if      ( var_i == 0 ) { R = V         ; G = TempRGB.z ; B = TempRGB.x }
        //    else if ( var_i == 2 ) { R = TempRGB.x ; G = V         ; B = TempRGB.z }
        //    else if ( var_i == 4 ) { R = TempRGB.z ; G = TempRGB.x ; B = V     }
        // 
        //    else if ( var_i == 1 ) { R = TempRGB.y ; G = V         ; B = TempRGB.x }
        //    else if ( var_i == 3 ) { R = TempRGB.x ; G = TempRGB.y ; B = V     }
        //    else if ( var_i == 5 ) { R = V         ; G = TempRGB.x ; B = TempRGB.y }
        //
        // This shows several things:
        //  . A separation between even and odd slices
        //  . If slices (0,2,4) and (1,3,5) can be rewritten as basically being slices (0,1,2) then
        //      the operation simply amounts to performing a "rotate right" on the RGB components
        //  . The base value to rotate is either (V, B, R) for even slices or (G, V, R) for odd slices
        //
        float   IsOddSlice = fmod( HueSliceInteger, 2.0 );                          // 0 if even (slices 0, 2, 4), 1 if odd (slices 1, 3, 5)
        float   ThreeSliceSelector = 0.5 * (HueSliceInteger - IsOddSlice);          // (0, 1, 2) corresponding to slices (0, 2, 4) and (1, 3, 5)

        float3  ScrollingRGBForEvenSlices = float3( _HSV.z, TempRGB.zx );           // (V, Temp Blue, Temp Red) for even slices (0, 2, 4)
        float3  ScrollingRGBForOddSlices = float3( TempRGB.y, _HSV.z, TempRGB.x );  // (Temp Green, V, Temp Red) for odd slices (1, 3, 5)
        float3  ScrollingRGB = lerp( ScrollingRGBForEvenSlices, ScrollingRGBForOddSlices, IsOddSlice );

        float   IsNotFirstSlice = saturate( ThreeSliceSelector );                   // 1 if NOT the first slice (true for slices 1 and 2)
        float   IsNotSecondSlice = saturate( ThreeSliceSelector-1.0 );              // 1 if NOT the first or second slice (true only for slice 2)

        return  lerp( ScrollingRGB.xyz, lerp( ScrollingRGB.zxy, ScrollingRGB.yzx, IsNotSecondSlice ), IsNotFirstSlice );    // Make the RGB rotate right depending on final slice index
    }
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This link has formulas for what you want. Then it's a matter of performance (numerical techniques) if you want it fast.

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this should be on here: it works anyway. And it looks good compared to the above ones.

        float3 Hue(float H)
        {
            half R = abs(H * 6 - 3) - 1;
            half G = 2 - abs(H * 6 - 2);
            half B = 2 - abs(H * 6 - 4);
            return saturate(half3(R,G,B));
        }

        half4 HSVtoRGB(in half3 HSV)
        {
            return half4(((Hue(HSV.x) - 1) * HSV.y + 1) * HSV.z,1);
        }
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@fins's answer has an overflow issue on Arduio as you turn the saturation down. Here it is with some values converted to int to prevent that.

typedef struct RgbColor
{
    unsigned char r;
    unsigned char g;
    unsigned char b;
} RgbColor;

typedef struct HsvColor
{
    unsigned char h;
    unsigned char s;
    unsigned char v;
} HsvColor;

RgbColor HsvToRgb(HsvColor hsv)
{
    RgbColor rgb;
    unsigned char region, p, q, t;
    unsigned int h, s, v, remainder;

    if (hsv.s == 0)
    {
        rgb.r = hsv.v;
        rgb.g = hsv.v;
        rgb.b = hsv.v;
        return rgb;
    }

    // converting to 16 bit to prevent overflow
    h = hsv.h;
    s = hsv.s;
    v = hsv.v;

    region = h / 43;
    remainder = (h - (region * 43)) * 6; 

    p = (v * (255 - s)) >> 8;
    q = (v * (255 - ((s * remainder) >> 8))) >> 8;
    t = (v * (255 - ((s * (255 - remainder)) >> 8))) >> 8;

    switch (region)
    {
        case 0:
            rgb.r = v;
            rgb.g = t;
            rgb.b = p;
            break;
        case 1:
            rgb.r = q;
            rgb.g = v;
            rgb.b = p;
            break;
        case 2:
            rgb.r = p;
            rgb.g = v;
            rgb.b = t;
            break;
        case 3:
            rgb.r = p;
            rgb.g = q;
            rgb.b = v;
            break;
        case 4:
            rgb.r = t;
            rgb.g = p;
            rgb.b = v;
            break;
        default:
            rgb.r = v;
            rgb.g = p;
            rgb.b = q;
            break;
    }

    return rgb;
}

HsvColor RgbToHsv(RgbColor rgb)
{
    HsvColor hsv;
    unsigned char rgbMin, rgbMax;

    rgbMin = rgb.r < rgb.g ? (rgb.r < rgb.b ? rgb.r : rgb.b) : (rgb.g < rgb.b ? rgb.g : rgb.b);
    rgbMax = rgb.r > rgb.g ? (rgb.r > rgb.b ? rgb.r : rgb.b) : (rgb.g > rgb.b ? rgb.g : rgb.b);

    hsv.v = rgbMax;
    if (hsv.v == 0)
    {
        hsv.h = 0;
        hsv.s = 0;
        return hsv;
    }

    hsv.s = 255 * ((long)(rgbMax - rgbMin)) / hsv.v;
    if (hsv.s == 0)
    {
        hsv.h = 0;
        return hsv;
    }

    if (rgbMax == rgb.r)
        hsv.h = 0 + 43 * (rgb.g - rgb.b) / (rgbMax - rgbMin);
    else if (rgbMax == rgb.g)
        hsv.h = 85 + 43 * (rgb.b - rgb.r) / (rgbMax - rgbMin);
    else
        hsv.h = 171 + 43 * (rgb.r - rgb.g) / (rgbMax - rgbMin);

    return hsv;
}
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GLSL Shader version based on Patapoms answer:

vec3 HSV2RGB( vec3 hsv )
{
    hsv.x = mod( 100.0 + hsv.x, 1.0 ); // Ensure [0,1[
    float   HueSlice = 6.0 * hsv.x; // In [0,6[
    float   HueSliceInteger = floor( HueSlice );
    float   HueSliceInterpolant = HueSlice - HueSliceInteger; // In [0,1[ for each hue slice
    vec3  TempRGB = vec3(   hsv.z * (1.0 - hsv.y), hsv.z * (1.0 - hsv.y * HueSliceInterpolant), hsv.z * (1.0 - hsv.y * (1.0 - HueSliceInterpolant)) );
    float   IsOddSlice = mod( HueSliceInteger, 2.0 ); // 0 if even (slices 0, 2, 4), 1 if odd (slices 1, 3, 5)
    float   ThreeSliceSelector = 0.5 * (HueSliceInteger - IsOddSlice); // (0, 1, 2) corresponding to slices (0, 2, 4) and (1, 3, 5)
    vec3  ScrollingRGBForEvenSlices = vec3( hsv.z, TempRGB.zx );           // (V, Temp Blue, Temp Red) for even slices (0, 2, 4)
    vec3  ScrollingRGBForOddSlices = vec3( TempRGB.y, hsv.z, TempRGB.x );  // (Temp Green, V, Temp Red) for odd slices (1, 3, 5)
    vec3  ScrollingRGB = mix( ScrollingRGBForEvenSlices, ScrollingRGBForOddSlices, IsOddSlice );
    float   IsNotFirstSlice = clamp( ThreeSliceSelector, 0.0,1.0 );                   // 1 if NOT the first slice (true for slices 1 and 2)
    float   IsNotSecondSlice = clamp( ThreeSliceSelector-1.0, 0.0,1. );              // 1 if NOT the first or second slice (true only for slice 2)
    return  mix( ScrollingRGB.xyz, mix( ScrollingRGB.zxy, ScrollingRGB.yzx, IsNotSecondSlice ), IsNotFirstSlice );    // Make the RGB rotate right depending on final slice index
}
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Why not use Trigonometry?

When observing the changes of the RGB values along the increase of the HUE value something tells me it looks like THREE PHASED SINUSES topped off at half their normal maxima. Like here: http://i.stack.imgur.com/Eb4Mc.jpg

So what if we'd implement Trigonometry with some adjustments to make it fit into what we want? Would the software take longer because of this approach?

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3  
Since this is not an answer, it should be a comment on the question. –  TheSoftwareJedi Jan 7 at 12:49

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