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I have a Maven web application with text files in

src/main/webapp/textfilesdir

As I understand it, during the package phase this textfilesdir directory will be copied into the

target/project-1.0-SNAPSHOT

directory, which is then zipped up into a

target/project-1.0-SNAPSHOT.war

Problem

Now, I need to do a string replacement on the contents of the text files in target/project-1.0-SNAPSHOT/textfilesdir. This must then be done after the textfilesdir is copied into target/project-1.0-SNAPSHOT, but prior to the target/project-1.0-SNAPSHOT.war file being created. I believe this is all done during the package phase.

How can a plugin (potentially maven-antrun-plugin), plug into the package phase to do this.

The text files don't contain properties, like ${property-name} to filter on. String replacement is likely the only option.

Options

  1. Modify the text files after the copy into target/project-1.0-SNAPSHOT directory, yet prior to the WAR creation.

  2. After packaging, extract the text files from WAR, modify them, and add them back into the WAR.

I'm thinking there is another option here I'm missing. Thoughts anyone?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Option 1 is not doable, prepare-package is too early, package is too late so I don't see where you could plug any custom work. Option 2 is doable but a painful IMO. So here are some more propositions (all based on AntRun and the ReplaceRegExp and/or Replace tasks).

Solution 1:

  1. Create a new folder where you put the text files that need to be processed.
  2. Bind the antrun plugin to prepare-package and configure it to process the files and put the processed files in some directory under target (e.g. target/textfilesdir).
  3. Configure the war plugin to include target/textfilesdir as a webResource. Refer to Adding and Filtering External Web Resources for the details.

Solution 2:

  1. Bind the antrun plugin to prepare-package and configure it to process the text files from src/main/webapp/textfilesdir and put the processed files in the target/project-1.0-SNAPSHOT.
  2. Configure the war plugin to exclude the previously processed files. Again, refer to Adding and Filtering External Web Resources for the details.

I think I'd go for the second solution.

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as usually, I'll suggest to use gmaven (docs.codehaus.org/display/GMAVEN/Executing+Groovy+Code) to embed groovy rather than ant, but otherwise I fully agree (+1) –  Sean Patrick Floyd Jun 10 '10 at 21:49
    
@seanizer: I need to think more Groovy :) It would certainly play nicely here. –  Pascal Thivent Jun 10 '10 at 21:57
    
yup. while I'm not too crazy about building groovy apps (grails etc), I think groovy is absolutely underrated as a scripting language –  Sean Patrick Floyd Jun 10 '10 at 22:00
    
Agreed, option 2 sounds like the way to go. I was wondering if there might be another approach, but this is less pom configuration than I originally thought. Thanks! Ant to the rescue? :) –  Jaco van Niekerk Jun 10 '10 at 22:08
    
Will check out gmaven too... –  Jaco van Niekerk Jun 10 '10 at 22:09
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I had a problem with the phases, using prepare-package not copied the file to war, my solution was this:

Add this configuration in maven-war-plugin

<plugin>
             <groupId>org.apache.maven.plugins</groupId> 
             <artifactId>maven-war-plugin</artifactId> 
              <version>2.1.1</version> 
         <executions>
          <execution>
               <phase>prepare-package</phase>
               <goals>
                    <goal>exploded</goal>
               </goals>
          </execution>
          <executions> 
               <configuration>
               <webResources>
                    <resource>
                         <directory>${basedir}/WebContent?</directory> <excludes>
               <!--Exclude the file because it is copied using the maven replacer plugin -->
                         <exclude>/style.scss</exclude>
                         </excludes>
                    </resource>
               </webResources>
          </configuration>
          </plugin>
          Add the configuration to replacer 
 <plugin>
       <groupId>com.google.code.maven-replacer-plugin</groupId> 
       <artifactId>replacer</artifactId> 
       <version>1.5.1</version> 
       <executions>
          <execution>
               <id>scss-replacement</id> <phase>prepare-package</phase> <goals>
               <goal>replace</goal>
               </goals> <configuration>
               <file>WebContent?/css/style.scss</file>
               <!-- My local file(WebContent?/css/style.scss) have a param
               $url: "http://localhost:8080/interface";
               --> <!-- regex with match to $url: "http://localhost:8080/interface"; -->
               <token>\$url:.</token>
               <!-- Replace to -->
               <value>\$url: "www.myapplication.com.br/css/style.css";</value>
               <outputFile>target/app/css/style.scss</outputFile>

               </configuration>
          </execution>
     <executions>
<plugin>

The output File not overwrite the file, so i put the configuration maven-war-plugin to exclude the file style.scss. bye!

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You can use maven-replacer-plugin:

<plugin>
       <groupId>com.google.code.maven-replacer-plugin</groupId>
       <artifactId>maven-replacer-plugin</artifactId>
       <version>1.3.7</version>
       <executions>
           <execution>
               <phase>prepare-package</phase>
               <goals>
                   <goal>replace</goal>
               </goals>                   
           </execution>
       </executions>
       <configuration>
           <file>target/${project.artifactId}-${project.version}/WEB-IN/site.xml</file>
           <replacements>
               <replacement>
                   <token>ear.version</token>
                   <value>${ear.version}-${maven.build.timestamp}</value>
               </replacement>         
           </replacements>
       </configuration>
   </plugin>

But you need two more tricks. One is adding the explode goal to the war plugin:

<plugin>
    <groupId>org.apache.maven.plugins</groupId>
    <artifactId>maven-war-plugin</artifactId>
    <version>2.1.1</version>
        .....
        <executions>
        <execution>
        <phase>prepare-package</phase>
            <goals>
                 <goal>exploded</goal>
             </goals>
         </execution>
    </executions>
</plugin>

And finally to need to call mvn clean before the package. You can do it from your pom:

                   <plugin>
                    <artifactId>maven-clean-plugin</artifactId>
                    <version>2.4.1</version>
                    <executions>
                      <execution>
                        <id>auto-clean</id>
                        <phase>initialize</phase>
                        <goals>
                          <goal>clean</goal>
                        </goals>
                      </execution>
                    </executions>
            </plugin>

If you are using a version of the maven-war-plugin newer than 2.0.1, you will need to include true in the configuration of the maven-war-plugin, otherwise the changes to your file(s) will be splotted when the war plugin copies your webapp over a second time. If you are using Hudson/Jenkins, you will have to use a version newer than 2.0.1.

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I had the same problem and I was fiddling a lot with this issue, so I will answer although this question is pretty old. As stated by leandro and Phil, one can use the maven-replacer-plugin. But their solution didn't work for me. Enabling useCache caused an error which made it impossible to build the project. Additionally, I can't make the auto-clean thing to work properly. As I am not allowed yet to comment on the post, I will provide my full solution here:

First of all, configure the maven-replacer-plugin:

<plugin> 
  <groupId>com.google.code.maven-replacer-plugin</groupId>
  <artifactId>maven-replacer-plugin</artifactId>
  <version>1.3.7</version>
  <executions>
    <execution>
      <phase>prepare-package</phase>
      <goals>
        <goal>replace</goal>
      </goals>
    </execution>
  </executions>
  <configuration>
    <includes>
      <include>target/${project.build.finalName}/static/**/*.css</include>
    </includes>
    <regex>false</regex>
    <token>someString</token>
    <value>replaceString</value>
  </configuration>
</plugin>

Before the actual war is built, we create an exploded war. This means, the whole content of the war file is stored in a sub directory (which is target/${project.build.finalName} by default). After that, the maven-replacer-plugin will change the contents of the files as we have specified. Finally, the .war will be packed in the package phase by the default-war job. To avoid the content of the exploded war folder being overridden, one has to set warSourceDirectory to the directory where the exploded war stuff is stored. The following configuration snippet will do this job:

<plugin>
  <artifactId>maven-war-plugin</artifactId>
  <version>2.1.1</version>
  <executions>
    <execution>
      <id>prepare</id>
      <phase>prepare-package</phase>
      <goals>
        <goal>exploded</goal>
  </goals>
    </execution>
    <execution> 
      <id>default-war</id>
      <phase>package</phase>
      <goals>
        <goal>war</goal>
      </goals>
      <configuration>
        <warSourceDirectory>${project.build.directory}/${project.build.finalName}</warSourceDirectory>
      </configuration>
    </execution>
  </executions>
</plugin>

The package with the replaced content can be built using mvn clean package

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Fantastic, thank you. –  user467257 Jan 18 '13 at 8:31
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