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I would like to use an enum value for my switch statment in C++. Is it possible to use the enum values enclosed in the "{}" as choices for the "switch()"? I know that switch() needs an integer value in order to direct the flow of programming to the appropriate case number. If this is the case, do I just make a variable for each constant in the 'enum' statment? I also want the user to be able to pick the choice and pass that choice to the switch() statement.

For example:

cout << "1 - Easy, ";
cout << "2 - Medium, ";
cout << "3 - Hard: ";

enum myChoice { EASY = 1, MEDIUM = 2, HARD = 3 };

cin >> ????

switch(????)
{
case 1/EASY:  // (can I just type case EASY?)
    cout << "You picked easy!";
    break;

case 2/MEDIUM: 
    cout << "You picked medium!";
    break;

case 3/HARD: // ..... (same thing as case 2 except on hard.)

default:
    return 0;
}
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2  
All of those cases == 1. –  Crazy Eddie Jun 10 '10 at 23:07
1  
@Noah: I believe he's using a slash to indicate "one or the other", not division. While mathematically you're correct, I don't believe that is the actual code he intends to use. –  KevenK Jun 11 '10 at 0:16

6 Answers 6

You can use an enumerated value just like an integer:

myChoice c;

...

switch( c ) {
case EASY:
    DoStuff();
    break;
case MEDIUM:
    ...
}
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You're on the right track. You may read the user input into an integer and switch on that:

  enum Choice
  {
    EASY = 1, 
    MEDIUM = 2, 
    HARD = 3
  };

  int i = -1;

// ...<present the user with a menu>...

  cin >> i;

  switch(i)
  {
  case EASY:
    cout << "Easy\n";
    break;
  case MEDIUM:
    cout << "Medium\n";
    break;
  case HARD:
    cout << "Hard\n";
    break;
  default:
    cout << "Invalid Selection\n";
    break;
  }
share|improve this answer
    
Should probably initialise i to a value that will hit the default case, though, or a value interpreted as I/O error. –  Steve Jessop Jun 10 '10 at 23:21
    
typedef enum e { ... }; ?? The typedef is optional in C++ but if present, there should be a typedef-ed name after the closing brace. Also, in C++ (as compared to C) you should use the enum type and not int for the variable (even if the compiler will gladly take int). –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Jun 10 '10 at 23:39
    
@Steve: agreed. Updated. –  Adam Jun 10 '10 at 23:53
    
@David: typedef error was definitely not standard form. Fixed. I chose not to declare the input as 'Choice' because that makes the input stream operator '>>' ambiguous. –  Adam Jun 10 '10 at 23:53
1  
Ok on the type of the variable, but still is more C++ like to have: enum Choice { EASY = 1, MEDIUM = 2, HARD = 3 }; rather than having a typedef of an unnamed enum. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Jun 10 '10 at 23:55

Some things to note:

You should always declare your enum inside a namespace as enums are not proper namespaces and you will be tempted to use them like one.

Always have a break at the end of each switch clause execution will continue downwards to the end otherwise.

Always include the default: case in your switch.

Use variables of enum type to hold enum values for clarity.

see here for a discussion of the correct use of enums in C++.

This is what you want to do.

namespace choices
{
    enum myChoice 
    { EASY = 1 ,
        MEDIUM = 2, 
        HARD = 3  
    };
}

int main(int c, char** argv)
{
    choices::myChoice enumVar;
    cin >> enumVar;
    switch (enumVar)
    {
        case choices::EASY:
        {
            // do stuff
            break;
        }
        case choices::MEDIUM:
        {
            // do stuff
            break;
        }

        default:
        {
            // is likely to be an error
        }
    };

}
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In order for this to work you would need to overload the istream operator>> for the enumeration. –  James McNellis Jun 10 '10 at 23:37
1  
+1 overall, but I disagree in the always provide a default: case. I understand that the intention is triggering a known error so that it can be easily corrected if a new enumerated value is later added to the enumeration. I prefer actually processing the input to guarantee the correctness of the user data, and not providing a default tag, but rather having the compiler warn about switch statements if there is any value that falls outside of all tested cases. This way you get an even faster error report: the compiler will complain if a value is added to the enumeration. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Jun 10 '10 at 23:44
    
Also you probably need to initialise enumVar. This code yields undefined behavior if cin >> enumVar doesn't write a value, which is typically the case when operator>> encounters an error. As James says, though, you'll be overloading the operator for the enum anyway, so you could write it to always assign something even on error. –  Steve Jessop Jun 11 '10 at 0:50
    
good comments and suggestions, that'll learn me to post a code solution without compiling it first :P –  radman Jun 11 '10 at 1:06

You can use a map to map the input to your enum:

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <map>
using namespace std;

enum level {easy, medium, hard};
map<string, level> levels;

void register_levels()
{
    levels["easy"]   = easy;
    levels["medium"] = medium;
    levels["hard"]   = hard;
}

int main()
{
    register_levels();
    string input;
    cin >> input;
    switch( levels[input] )
    {
    case easy:
        cout << "easy!"; break;
    case medium:
        cout << "medium!"; break;
    case hard:
        cout << "hard!"; break;
    }
}
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This will return easy if the string does not match any of the valid choices. –  dreamlax Jun 11 '10 at 1:32

i had a similar issue using enum with switch cases later i resolved it on my own....below is the corrected code, perhaps this might help.

     //Menu Chooser Programe using enum
     #include<iostream>
     using namespace std;
     int main()
     {
        enum level{Novice=1, Easy, Medium, Hard};
        level diffLevel=Novice;
        int i;
        cout<<"\nenter a level: ";
        cin>>i;
        switch(i)
        {
        case Novice: cout<<"\nyou picked Novice\n"; break;
        case Easy: cout<<"\nyou picked Easy\n"; break;
        case Medium: cout<<"\nyou picked Medium\n"; break;
        case Hard: cout<<"\nyou picked Hard\n"; break;
        default: cout<<"\nwrong input!!!\n"; break;
        }
        return 0;
     }
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The user's input will always be given to you in the form of a string of characters... if you want to convert the user's input from a string to an integer, you'll need to supply the code to do that. If the user types in a number (e.g. "1"), you can pass the string to atoi() to get the integer corresponding to the string. If the user types in an english string (e.g. "EASY") then you'll need to check for that string (e.g. with strcmp()) and assign the appropriate integer value to your variable based on which check matches. Once you have an integer value that was derived from the user's input string, you can pass it into the switch() statement as usual.

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1  
The code to convert the input from a string to an integer is int i; cin >> i;. This isn't C, so there's no need to mess around with the C library. –  Mike Seymour Jun 10 '10 at 23:16

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