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I am working on an embeddable javascript which inserts HTML elements onto unknown pages. I have no control of the stylesheets of the pages I'll be inserting HTML into. The problem is that the HTML I insert will mistakenly stylized by the page, and I want to prevent that.

What's the least verbose and/or resource intensive to go about ensuring the elements I insert are exactly as I'd like them to be? Is there an easy way to clear all styling for a given HTML element and children? In firebug, for instance, you can remove all styling. I feel like there must, and the very least should, be a native way to exempt certain HTML elements from stylesheet rules?

Example:

var myHTML = $("<div>my html in here</div>");
myHTML.resetAllStyles();   //<--- what would this function do?
myHTML.appendTo("body");

I really want to avoid explicitly stating the attributes I want for each element I insert...

PS: I have a lot of experience with JS and CSS, so you can assume that I'll understand pretty much anything you're going to tell me.

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+1 for the great discussion you started :) –  Kau-Boy Jun 11 '10 at 0:32
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2 Answers

I'm going to throw this out there as a possibility. How about custom tags for your bookmarklet? Requires a little more tinkering with a custom xml namespace because of IE, but may be workable for you.

jQuery doesn't seem to mind either.

http://jsfiddle.net/uvfAf/1/

jQuery:

$('#tester').animate({opacity: .3},1000);

HTML:

   // Not the main HTML tags. These are embedded in the body as the root
   //   of the bookmarklet. Scary? Perhaps.
<html xmlns:customtag>
    <style> 
        @media all {  
          customtag\:someElement { 
            width:100px; 
            height: 100px; 
            background: blue; 
            display: block; 
          } 
          customtag\:someOtherElement { 
            width: 50px; 
            height: 50px; 
            background: red; 
            display: block; 
          }
        }
    </style>
    <customtag:someElement id='tester'>test</customtag:someElement>
    <customtag:someOtherElement>test</customtag:someOtherElement>
</html>​

I used this page to figure out how to do custom tags in IE:

http://happyworm.com/blog/tag/custom-tags/

EDIT:

Looks like IE wants the xmlns to be defined in HTML tags, so I changed the container to <html>. Not sure of the ramifications overall, but seems to work.

I updated the example and the jsFiddle.

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This is an awesome approach! I'll give this a shot, though I suspect I'm in for a world of hurt when it comes to cross browser compatibility. –  Sambo Jun 11 '10 at 20:06
    
In Chrome/Safari/Firefox, you wouldn't have to go to the trouble of all the funky XML namespace tags. You could just assign whatever tag you want <mycustomtag></mycustomtag> and it would work. IE is the problem, hence the xml namespacing. Seems to work just fine cross-browser. –  user113716 Jun 11 '10 at 20:11
    
@Sambo - Be sure to let me know how it turns out for you. –  user113716 Jun 11 '10 at 20:49
    
how would you handle input tags like this? For example how to namespace the input tag to behave like password? –  Pentium10 Jul 23 '12 at 9:53
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You cannot prevent an element inheriting CSS styles from parent nodes. All you can do is overwriting all styles that has been inherited.

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Awful. Who are the short sighted idiots that came up with this spec? –  Sambo Jun 10 '10 at 23:38
2  
@Sambo - There are mechanisms to do this, if you want a frame, use a frame, an <iframe>. –  Nick Craver Jun 10 '10 at 23:42
    
They were very clever creating CSS. But some programmers have to learn that they can not reinvent a programming lanuage for their needs :) –  Kau-Boy Jun 10 '10 at 23:43
3  
@Sambo - Why not? an <iframe> doesn't have to be another document or URL. CSS does exactly what it's name says, it cascades :) –  Nick Craver Jun 10 '10 at 23:45
1  
@Sambo - Also stop and think if you should be doing this, what properties are interfering? Shouldn't you just set those, and let the user/page define the rest so it fits with the overall theme? –  Nick Craver Jun 11 '10 at 0:05
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