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How to check user authority or permission in Java Code ? For example - I want to show or hide button for user depending on role. There are annotations like:

@PreAuthorize("hasRole('ROLE_USER')")

How to make it in Java code? Something like :

if(somethingHere.hasRole("ROLE_MANAGER")) {
   layout.addComponent(new Button("Edit users"));
}
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10 Answers 10

up vote 31 down vote accepted

Spring Security 3.0 has this API

SecurityContextHolderAwareRequestWrapper.isUserInRole(String role)

http://static.springsource.org/spring-security/site/apidocs/org/springframework/security/web/servletapi/SecurityContextHolderAwareRequestWrapper.html#isUserInRole(java.lang.String)

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1  
This just do for-each lookup over auth.getAuthorities() It's easier to copy this code than construct or retreive SecurityContextHolderAwareRequestWrapper object. I'd rather wanted to use all security EL methods. For example hasPermission from ACL –  Piotr Gwiazda Jun 11 '10 at 11:58

you can use the isUserInRole method of the HttpServletRequest object.

something like:

public String createForm(HttpSession session, HttpServletRequest request,  ModelMap   modelMap) {


    if (request.isUserInRole("ROLE_ADMIN")) {
        // code here
    }
}
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You're the best! –  Christian Vielma Apr 30 '13 at 18:15
    
easier to test I think –  bob l'éponge est un ... Feb 14 at 11:16

You can retrieve the security context and then use that:

    import org.springframework.security.core.Authentication;
    import org.springframework.security.core.GrantedAuthority;
    import org.springframework.security.core.context.SecurityContext;
    import org.springframework.security.core.context.SecurityContextHolder;

    protected boolean hasRole(String role) {
        // get security context from thread local
        SecurityContext context = SecurityContextHolder.getContext();
        if (context == null)
            return false;

        Authentication authentication = context.getAuthentication();
        if (authentication == null)
            return false;

        for (GrantedAuthority auth : authentication.getAuthorities()) {
            if (role.equals(auth.getAuthority()))
                return true;
        }

        return false;
    }
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You can implement a hasRole() method as below - (This is tested on spring security 3.0.x not sure about other versions.)

  protected final boolean hasRole(String role) {
    boolean hasRole = false;
    UserDetails userDetails = getUserDetails();
    if (userDetails != null) {
      Collection<GrantedAuthority> authorities = userDetails.getAuthorities();
      if (isRolePresent(authorities, role)) {
        hasRole = true;
      }
    } 
    return hasRole;
  }
  /**
   * Get info about currently logged in user
   * @return UserDetails if found in the context, null otherwise
   */
  protected UserDetails getUserDetails() {
    Object principal = SecurityContextHolder.getContext().getAuthentication().getPrincipal();
    UserDetails userDetails = null;
    if (principal instanceof UserDetails) {
      userDetails = (UserDetails) principal;
    }
    return userDetails;
  }
  /**
   * Check if a role is present in the authorities of current user
   * @param authorities all authorities assigned to current user
   * @param role required authority
   * @return true if role is present in list of authorities assigned to current user, false otherwise
   */
  private boolean isRolePresent(Collection<GrantedAuthority> authorities, String role) {
    boolean isRolePresent = false;
    for (GrantedAuthority grantedAuthority : authorities) {
      isRolePresent = grantedAuthority.getAuthority().equals(role);
      if (isRolePresent) break;
    }
    return isRolePresent;
  }
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Thank you, Gopi! –  anton1980 Jul 11 '12 at 16:30
    
SecurityContextHolder.getContext().getAuthentication() can retrieve null. Maybe you add some check? –  Mrusful Jan 20 '13 at 9:45

Instead of using a loop to find the authority from UserDetails you can also do:

Collection<? extends GrantedAuthority> authorities = authentication.getAuthorities();
boolean authorized = authorities.contains(new SimpleGrantedAuthority('ROLE_ADMIN'));
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The answer from JoseK can't be used when your in your service layer, where you don't want to introduce a coupling with the web layer from the reference to the HTTP request. If you're looking into resolving the roles while in the service layer, Gopi's answer is the way to go.

However, it's a bit long winded. The authorities can be accessed right from the Authentication. Hence, if you can assume that you have a user logged in, the following does it:

/**
 * @return true if the user has one of the specified roles.
 */
protected boolean hasRole(String[] roles) {
    boolean result = false;
    for (GrantedAuthority authority : SecurityContextHolder.getContext().getAuthentication().getAuthorities()) {
        String userRole = authority.getAuthority();
        for (String role : roles) {
            if (role.equals(userRole)) {
                result = true;
                break;
            }
        }

        if (result) {
            break;
        }
    }

    return result;
}
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I'm using this:

@RequestMapping(method = RequestMethod.GET)
public void welcome(SecurityContextHolderAwareRequestWrapper request) {
    boolean b = request.isUserInRole("ROLE_ADMIN");
    System.out.println("ROLE_ADMIN=" + b);

    boolean c = request.isUserInRole("ROLE_USER");
    System.out.println("ROLE_USER=" + c);
}
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Strangely enough, I don't think there is a standard solution to this problem, as the spring-security access control is expression based, not java-based. you might check the source code for DefaultMethodSecurityExpressionHandler to see if you can re-use something they are doing there

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So your solution is to use DefaultMethodSecurityExpressionHandler as bean and get expression parser and check it in EL ? –  Piotr Gwiazda Jun 11 '10 at 12:03
    
that probably won't work, as the handler operates on methodinvocations (which you don't have in your context). you probably need to create your own bean that does something similar, but without using a methodinvocation context –  Sean Patrick Floyd Jun 11 '10 at 12:54

Better late then never, let me put in my 2 cents worth.

In JSF world, within my managed bean, I did the following:


HttpServletRequest req = (HttpServletRequest) FacesContext.getCurrentInstance().getExternalContext().getRequest();
SecurityContextHolderAwareRequestWrapper sc = new SecurityContextHolderAwareRequestWrapper(req, "");

As mentioned above, my understanding is that it can be done the long winded way as followed:


Object principal = SecurityContextHolder.getContext().getAuthentication().getPrincipal();
UserDetails userDetails = null;
if (principal instanceof UserDetails) {
    userDetails = (UserDetails) principal;
    Collection  authorities = userDetails.getAuthorities();
}
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This is sort of coming at the question from the other end but I thought I'd throw it in as I really had to dig on the internet to find this out.

There is a lot of stuff about how to check roles but not much saying what you are actually checking when you say hasRole("blah")

HasRole checks the granted authorities for the currently authenticated principal

So really when you see hasRole("blah") really means hasAuthority("blah").

In the case I've seen, you do this with a class that Implements UserDetails which defines a method called getAuthorities. In this you'll basically add some new SimpleGrantedAuthority("some name") to a list based on some logic. The names in this list are the things checked by the hasRole statements.

I guess in this context the UserDetails object is the currently authenticated principal. There's some magic that happens in and around authentication providers and more specifically the authentication-manager that makes this happen.

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