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With jQuery, how do I find out which key was pressed when I bind to the keypress event?

$('#searchbox input').bind('keypress', function(e) {});

I want to trigger an submit when ENTER is pressed.

[Update]

Even though I found the (or better: one) answer myself, there seems to be some room for variation ;)

Is there a difference between keyCode and which - especially if I'm just looking for ENTER, which will never be a unicode key?

Do some browsers provide one property and others provide the other one?

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259  
** If anyone has reached this from Google (like I did), know that "keyup" instead of "keypress" works in Firefox, IE, and Chrome. "keypress" apparently only works in Firefox. –  Tyler Nov 22 '09 at 3:05
9  
also, "keydown" works better than "keyup" for triggering an event AFTER the key has been pressed (obviously) but this is important if you say want to trigger an event on the SECOND backspace if a textarea is empty –  Tyler Nov 22 '09 at 5:39
10  
As for e.keyCode VS e.which... From my tests, Chrome and IE8: the keypress() handler will only get triggered for normal characters (i.e. not Up/Down/Ctrl), and both e.keyCode and e.which will return the ASCII code. In Firefox however, all keys will trigger keypress(), BUT: for normal characters e.which will return the ASCII code and e.keyCode will return 0, and for special characters (e.g. Up/Down/Ctrl) e.keyCode will return the keyboard code, and e.which will return 0. How fun. –  jackocnr May 25 '10 at 18:10
2  
Warning: DON'T use the one from google code. The author of jquery submited a patch, that is only on the github repository (and John Resig's fork as well): github.com/tzuryby/jquery.hotkeys. The one from google code misbehaves when binding more than one key event to the same dom node. The new one solves it. –  Daniel Ribeiro Aug 29 '10 at 0:58
2  
"keyup" will get triggered very very late when you e.g. press a key for a long time. See here jsbin.com/aquxit/3/edit so keydown is the way to go –  Toskan Oct 8 '12 at 11:03
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21 Answers 21

up vote 585 down vote accepted

Actually this is better:

 var code = e.keyCode || e.which;
 if(code == 13) { //Enter keycode
   //Do something
 }
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198  
var code = e.keyCode || e.which; –  Jimmy Nov 19 '08 at 19:20
58  
if ((e.keyCode || e.which) == 13) ? ;) –  Kieran Senior Apr 1 '10 at 15:43
40  
According to a comment further down on this page, jQuery normalizes so that 'which' is defined on the event object every time. So, checking for 'keyCode' should be unnecessary. –  Ztyx Jun 22 '10 at 14:58
149  
Why the enormous upvote count? The question is about jQuery, which normalizes this stuff, so there's no need to use anything other than e.which, whichever event you're using. –  Tim Down Jan 25 '11 at 12:33
30  
@Tim: Alas, I just tested this with Firefox using api.jquery.com/keypress : when I press <Tab>, e.which isn't set (remains 0), but e.keyCode is (9). See stackoverflow.com/questions/4793233/… why this matters. –  Marcel Korpel Jan 25 '11 at 12:37
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Try this

$('#searchbox input').bind('keypress', function(e) {
	if(e.keyCode==13){
		// Enter pressed... do anything here...
	}
});
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10  
I come here just to copy this all the time. I gotta memorize the bind part. –  Ryan Sep 1 '11 at 23:38
4  
Hey Ryan, you can use Snippets :) –  Vladimir Prudnikov Sep 7 '11 at 10:26
2  
@VladimirPrudnikov Oh, oh, Ahhhh! Ahh! there were mac's eveywhere at that link - the humanity!!! –  Ben DeMott Jul 6 '12 at 20:41
    
Well, we launched a new version with Windows app too.. check out snippets.me –  Vladimir Prudnikov Jul 9 '12 at 12:59
1  
@VladimirPrudnikov how about a linux version ? –  Arda Sep 12 '12 at 7:19
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If you are using jQuery UI you have translations for common key codes. In ui/ui/ui.core.js:

$.ui.keyCode = { 
    ...
    ENTER: 13, 
    ...
};

There's also some translations in tests/simulate/jquery.simulate.js but I could not find any in the core JS library. Mind you, I merely grep'ed the sources. Maybe there is some other way to get rid of these magic numbers.

You can also make use of String.charCodeAt and .fromCharCode:

>>> String.charCodeAt('\r') == 13
true
>>> String.fromCharCode(13) == '\r'
true
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12  
Correction it's $.ui.keyCode.ENTER not $.keyCode.ENTER -- does work like a charm though thx for the tip! –  daniellmb Sep 2 '09 at 19:12
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Given that you are using jQuery, you should absolutely use .which. Yes different browsers set different properties, but jQuery will normalize them and set the .which value in each case. See documetation at http://api.jquery.com/keydown/ it states:

To determine which key was pressed, we can examine the event object that is passed to the handler function. While browsers use differing properties to store this information, jQuery normalizes the .which property so we can reliably use it to retrieve the key code.

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2  
From what I've seen using event.which and trying to compare to $.ui.keyCode results in uncertain behavior. Specifically the lowercase [L] key's which maps to $.ui.keyCode.NUMPAD_ENTER. Cute. –  Danny Jun 14 '10 at 18:26
4  
Do you have a repro that demonstrates this bug? Its preferable to report this to the owners of jQuery rather than try to reimplement their work. –  Frank Schwieterman Jan 18 '11 at 20:40
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... this example prevents form submission (regularly the basic intention when capturing keystroke #13):

$('input#search').keypress(function(e) {
  if (e.which == '13') {
     e.preventDefault();
     doSomethingWith(this.value);
   }
});
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3  
Nice and simple, yet effective 10/10 –  Nasir Jan 17 '11 at 12:48
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This is probably the better and comprehensive one!

Really the cross-browser way:

if (!event.which && ((event.charCode || event.charCode === 0) ? event.charCode: event.keyCode)) {
    event.which = event.charCode || event.keyCode;
}
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1  
This is the real answer. The accepted one will work for some keys (like enter) but will fail for others (like supr that will be mistaken by a .) –  cad May 14 '10 at 16:31
16  
This is a direct paste from the jQuery source, and is the code that jQuery uses to normalize the .which event property. –  Ian Clelland Jul 7 '10 at 23:08
    
@Ian Clelland: i can't understand your point, is this working right or not!? lol –  aSeptik Nov 9 '10 at 12:06
12  
It does work; I'm sure of it, because jQuery uses exactly that code :) If you already have jQuery available, then just use it -- you don't need to have this in your own code. –  Ian Clelland Nov 10 '10 at 18:51
    
Thanks and i really meant it. It saved my lot of stupid efforts. ;) –  Vikas Gupta Jul 27 '12 at 10:45
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Checkout this excellent jQuery hotkeys plugin which supports key combinations:

$(document).bind('keydown', 'ctrl+c', fn);
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$(document).ready(function(){
    $("#btnSubmit").bind("click",function(){$('#'+'<%=btnUpload.ClientID %>').trigger("click");return false;});
    $("body, input, textarea").keypress(function(e){
        if(e.which==13) $("#btnSubmit").click();
    });
});

Hope this may help you!!!

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edit: This only works for IE...

I realize this is an old posting, but someone might find this useful.

The key events are mapped, so instead of using the keycode value you can also use the key value to make it a little more readable.

$(document).ready( function() {
    $('#searchbox input').keydown(function(e)
    {
     setTimeout(function ()
     { 
       //rather than using keyup, you can use keydown to capture 
       //the input as it's being typed.
       //You may need to use a timeout in order to allow the input to be updated
     }, 5);
    }); 
    if(e.key == "Enter")
    {
       //Enter key was pressed, do stuff
    }else if(e.key == "Spacebar")
    {
       //Spacebar was pressed, do stuff
    }
});

Here is a cheat sheet with the mapped keys which I got from this blog enter image description here

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3  
There is no e.key property. –  SLaks Feb 7 '13 at 20:47
2  
Hmm, it looks like it's an IE specific property. It works for my app in IE but not Chrome. Guess I'm using keycode. –  Kevin Feb 8 '13 at 0:47
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Okay, I was blind:

e.which

will contain the ASCII code of the key.

See https://developer.mozilla.org/En/DOM/Event.which

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The link is broken. –  Nathan Long Nov 19 '08 at 16:19
    
That does not work for all browsers, unless using jQuery –  Lathan Jul 12 '11 at 14:02
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Here's a jquery extension that will handle the enter key being pressed.

(function ($) {
    $.prototype.enterPressed = function (fn) {
        $(this).keyup(function (e) {
            if ((e.keyCode || e.which) == 13) {
                fn();
            }
        });
    };
}(jQuery || {}));

$("#myInput").enterPressed(function() {
    //do something
});

A working example can be found here http://jsfiddle.net/EnjB3/8/

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Here is an at-length description of the behaviour of various browsers http://unixpapa.com/js/key.html

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1  
This is absolutely the page that everyone floundering around providing hopeless answers should be reading. –  Tim Down Jan 25 '11 at 12:31
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I'll just supplement solution code with this line e.preventDefault();. In case of input field of form we don't attend to submit on enter pressed

var code = (e.keyCode ? e.keyCode : e.which);
 if(code == 13) { //Enter keycode
   e.preventDefault();
   //Do something
 }
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Add hidden submit, not type hidden, just plain submit with style="display:none". Here is an example (removed unnecessary attributes from code).

<form>
  <input type="text">
  <input type="submit" style="display:none">
</form>

it will accept enter key natively, no need for JavaScript, works in every browser.

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According to Kilian's answer:

If only enter key-press is important:

<form action="javascript:alert('Enter');">
<input type=text value="press enter">
</form>
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+1 for hinting to a way not shown yet –  Josua Schmid Sep 3 '12 at 13:43
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$(document).bind('keypress', function (e) {
    console.log(e.which);  //or alert(e.which);

});

you should have firbug to see a result in console

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if it is in a form-field, you may try something totally different, too:
set the form's action to
< ... action="javascript:someFunction(whatever)" ... >
this is a lot simpler :-)

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The easiest way that I do is:

$("#element").keydown(function(event) {
    if (event.keyCode == 13) {
        localiza_cep(this.value);
    }
});
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1  
It would be better to use event.which instead of event.keyCode. From jQuery API: The event.which property normalizes event.keyCode and event.charCode. It is recommended to watch event.which for keyboard key input. –  zanetu Sep 16 '13 at 20:39
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Witch ;)

/*
This code is for example. In real life you have plugins like :
https://code.google.com/p/jquery-utils/wiki/JqueryUtils
https://github.com/jeresig/jquery.hotkeys/blob/master/jquery.hotkeys.js
https://github.com/madrobby/keymaster
http://dmauro.github.io/Keypress/

http://api.jquery.com/keydown/
http://api.jquery.com/keypress/
*/

var event2key = {'97':'a', '98':'b', '99':'c', '100':'d', '101':'e', '102':'f', '103':'g', '104':'h', '105':'i', '106':'j', '107':'k', '108':'l', '109':'m', '110':'n', '111':'o', '112':'p', '113':'q', '114':'r', '115':'s', '116':'t', '117':'u', '118':'v', '119':'w', '120':'x', '121':'y', '122':'z', '37':'left', '39':'right', '38':'up', '40':'down', '13':'enter'};

var documentKeys = function(event) {
    console.log(event.type, event.which, event.keyCode);

    var keycode = event.which || event.keyCode; // par exemple : 112
    var myKey = event2key[keycode]; // par exemple : 'p'

    switch (myKey) {
        case 'a':
            $('div').css({
                left: '+=50'
            });
            break;
        case 'z':
            $('div').css({
                left: '-=50'
            });
            break;
        default:
            //console.log('keycode', keycode);
    }
};

$(document).on('keydown keyup keypress', documentKeys);

Demo : http://jsfiddle.net/molokoloco/hgXyq/24/

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Some browsers use keyCode, others use which. If you're using jQuery, you can reliably use which as jQuery standardizes things. Actually, I think you can reliably use either (with jQuery).

$('#searchbox input').bind('keypress', function(e) {
    if(e.keyCode==13){

    }
});
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Try this:

jQuery('#myInput').keypress(function(e) {
    code = e.keyCode ? e.keyCode : e.which;
    if(code.toString() == 13) {
        alert('You pressed enter!');
    }
});
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22  
you're a necromancer, aren't you? –  Gnark Feb 9 '10 at 19:28
2  
I voted this guy down simply cos he was an idiot who didn't know wtf he was talking about :D –  pythonian29033 Jun 24 '13 at 14:54
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protected by Community Aug 21 '12 at 15:59

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