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I have a style defined for my ListBoxItems with a trigger to set a background color when IsSelected is True:

    <Style x:Key="StepItemStyle" TargetType="{x:Type ListBoxItem}">
        <Setter Property="SnapsToDevicePixels" Value="true"/>
        <Setter Property="OverridesDefaultStyle" Value="true"/>
        <Setter Property="Template">
            <Setter.Value>
                <ControlTemplate TargetType="ListBoxItem">
                    <Border Name="Border" Padding="0" SnapsToDevicePixels="true">
                        <ContentPresenter />
                    </Border>
                    <ControlTemplate.Triggers>
                        <Trigger Property="IsSelected" Value="True">
                            <Setter TargetName="Border" Property="Background" Value="#40a0f5ff"/>
                        </Trigger>
                    </ControlTemplate.Triggers>
                </ControlTemplate>
            </Setter.Value>
        </Setter>
    </Style>

This style maintains the selected item even when the ListBox and ListBoxItem loses focus, which in my case is an absolute must. The problem is that I also want the ListBoxItem to be selected when one of its TextBox's child gets focused. To achieve this I add a trigger that sets IsSelected to true when IsKeyboardFocusWithin is true:

<Trigger Property="IsKeyboardFocusWithin" Value="True">
    <Setter Property="IsSelected" Value="True" />
</Trigger>

When I add this trigger the Item is selected when the focus is on a child TextBox, but the first behaviour disappears. Now when I click outside the ListBox, the item is de-selected.

How can I keep both behaviours?

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4 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

When your listbox looses focus, it will set selected item to null because of your trigger. You can select on focus using some code behind that will not unselect when you loose focus.

XAML:

<Window x:Class="SelectedTest.Window1"
    xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"
    xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"
    Height="300" Width="300">

    <StackPanel>
        <TextBox Text="Loose focus here" />
        <ListBox Name="_listBox" ItemsSource="{Binding Path=Items}">
            <ListBox.ItemTemplate>
                <DataTemplate>
                    <StackPanel Orientation="Horizontal" GotFocus="OnChildGotFocus">
                        <TextBox Text="{Binding .}" Margin="10" />
                        <TextBox Text="{Binding .}" Margin="10" />
                    </StackPanel>
                </DataTemplate>
            </ListBox.ItemTemplate>
            <ListBox.ItemContainerStyle>
                <Style TargetType="{x:Type ListBoxItem}">
                    <Setter Property="SnapsToDevicePixels" Value="true"/>
                    <Setter Property="OverridesDefaultStyle" Value="true"/>
                    <Setter Property="Template">
                        <Setter.Value>
                            <ControlTemplate TargetType="ListBoxItem">
                                <Border Name="Border" SnapsToDevicePixels="true" Background="Transparent">
                                    <ContentPresenter />
                                </Border>
                                <ControlTemplate.Triggers>
                                    <Trigger Property="IsSelected" Value="True">
                                        <Setter TargetName="Border" Property="Background" Value="Red"/>
                                    </Trigger>                                   
                                </ControlTemplate.Triggers>
                            </ControlTemplate>
                        </Setter.Value>
                    </Setter>
                </Style>
            </ListBox.ItemContainerStyle>
        </ListBox>
    </StackPanel>
</Window>

Code behind:

private void OnChildGotFocus(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e) 
{   
   _listBox.SelectedItem = (sender as StackPanel).DataContext; 
}
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Thanks very much! That's exactly what I was looking for. –  jpsstavares Jun 11 '10 at 13:45
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I figured out that IsKeyboardFocusWithin is not the best solution.

What I did in this case was to set the style on all of the controls used as DataTemplate to send the GotFocus-event to be handled in code behind. Then, in code behind, I searched up the visual tree (using VisualTreeHelper) to find the ListViewItem and set IsSelected to true. This way it does not "touch" the DataContext and works just with the View elements.

<Style TargetType="{x:Type Control}" x:Key="GridCellControlStyle">
...
<EventSetter Event="GotFocus" Handler="SelectListViewItemOnControlGotFocus"/>
...

private void SelectListViewItemOnControlGotFocus(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
{
var control = (Control)sender;
FocusParentListViewItem(control);
}

private void FocusParentListViewItem(Control control)
{
var listViewItem = FindVisualParent<ListViewItem>(control);
if (listViewItem != null)
    listViewItem.IsSelected = true;
}

public static T FindVisualParent<T>(UIElement element) where T : UIElement
{
UIElement parent = element; 

while (parent != null)
{
    var correctlyTyped = parent as T; 

    if (correctlyTyped != null)
    {
        return correctlyTyped;
    }

    parent = VisualTreeHelper.GetParent(parent) as UIElement;
} 

return null;
}
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"When I add this trigger the Item is selected when the focus is on a child TextBox, but the first behaviour disappears. Now when I click outside the ListBox, the item is de-selected."

Actually, I don't think it has lost that original behavior. What I suspect is happening is you're clicking directly in the textbox from somewhere else so the underlying ListBoxItem never actually became selected. If it did however, you'd see the selection would still remain after you left as you want.

You can test this by forcing the ListBoxItem to be selected by clicking directly on it (side-note: you should always give it a background, even if just 'transparent' so it can receive mouse clicks, which it won't if it's null) or even just hitting 'Shift-Tab' to set the focus there, back from the textbox.

However, that doesn't solve your issue, which is that the TextBox gets the focus but doesn't let the underlying ListBoxItem know about it.

The two approaches you can use for that are an event trigger or an attached behavior.

The first is an event trigger on the IsKeyboardFocusWithinChanged event where you set 'IsSelected' to true if the keyboard focus changed to true. (Note: Sheridan's answer does a faux-change-notification but it should not be used in cases where you can multi-select in the list because everything becomes selected.) But even an event trigger causes issues because you lose the multi-select behaviors such as toggling or range-clicking, etc.

The other (and my preferred approach) is to write an attached behavior which you would set on the ListBoxItem's style.

Here's the attached behavior. Note: You again would need to handle the multi-select stuff if you want to implement that. Also note that although I'm attaching the behavior to a ListBoxItem, inside I cast to UIElement. This way you can also use it in ComboBoxItem, TreeViewItem, etc. Basically any ContainerItem in a Selector-based control.

public class AutoSelectWhenAnyChildGetsFocus
{
    public static readonly DependencyProperty EnabledProperty = DependencyProperty.RegisterAttached(
        "Enabled",
        typeof(bool),
        typeof(AutoSelectWhenAnyChildFocused),
        new UIPropertyMetadata(false, Enabled_Changed));

    public static bool GetEnabled(DependencyObject obj){ return (bool)obj.GetValue(EnabledProperty); }
    public static void SetEnabled(DependencyObject obj, bool value){ obj.SetValue(EnabledProperty, value); }

    private static void Enabled_Changed(DependencyObject sender, DependencyPropertyChangedEventArgs e)
    {
        var attachEvents = (bool)e.NewValue;
        var targetUiElement = (UIElement)sender;

        if(attachEvents)
            targetUiElement.IsKeyboardFocusWithinChanged += TargetUiElement_IsKeyboardFocusWithinChanged;
        else
            targetUiElement.IsKeyboardFocusWithinChanged -= TargetUiElement_IsKeyboardFocusWithinChanged;
    }

    static void TargetUiElement_IsKeyboardFocusWithinChanged(object sender, DependencyPropertyChangedEventArgs e)
    {
        var targetUiElement = (UIElement)sender;

        if(targetUiElement.IsKeyboardFocusWithin)
            Selector.SetIsSelected(targetUiElement, true);
    }

}

...and you simply add this as a property setter in your ListBoxItem's style

<Setter Property="behaviors:AutoSelectWhenAnyChildGetsFocus.Enabled" Value="True" />

This of course assumes you've imported an XML namespace called 'behaviors' that points to the namespace where the class is contained. You can put the class itself in a shared 'Helper' library, which is what we do. That way, everywhere we want it, its a simple property set in the XAML and the behavior takes care of everything else.

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I know this is an old post, but there is a much easier way to get your required functionality:

<Trigger Property="IsKeyboardFocusWithin" Value="True"> 
    <Setter Property="IsSelected" Value="True" /> 
</Trigger>
<Trigger Property="IsKeyboardFocusWithin" Value="False"> 
    <Setter Property="IsSelected" Value="True" /> 
</Trigger>

I know it looks strange, but it works and no code behind is required.

EDIT from MarqueIV >>>>>>>

This technique does not work with multi-select listboxes because of the conflicting triggers. In the case of the mode being set to 'Multiple', all rows become selected, and [only in my opinion] in the case of the mode being set to 'Extended' it interferes with CTRL-Clicking on rows.

You can see these issue using the code below. Paste it in a new window and run. The list on the left is single-select. The one on the right is multi-select and has all rows selected (it's set to 'Multiple.' Change to 'Extended' and try selecting ranges to see the other issue.)

<Window x:Class="TriggerTest.MainWindow"
    xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"
    xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"
    Width="300" Height="200" WindowStartupLocation="CenterScreen"
    Title="Trigger Test" >

    <Window.Resources>
        <Style TargetType="{x:Type ListBoxItem}">
            <Style.Triggers>
                <Trigger Property="IsKeyboardFocusWithin" Value="True">
                    <Setter Property="IsSelected" Value="True" />
                </Trigger>
                <Trigger Property="IsKeyboardFocusWithin" Value="False">
                    <Setter Property="IsSelected" Value="True" />
                </Trigger>
            </Style.Triggers>
        </Style>
    </Window.Resources>

    <UniformGrid Margin="4" Rows="1" Columns="2">

        <ListBox Margin="4">
            <ListBoxItem>First Item</ListBoxItem>
            <ListBoxItem>Second Item</ListBoxItem>
            <ListBoxItem>Third Item</ListBoxItem>
            <ListBoxItem>Fourth Item</ListBoxItem>
        </ListBox>

        <ListBox SelectionMode="Multiple" Margin="4">
            <ListBoxItem>First Item</ListBoxItem>
            <ListBoxItem>Second Item</ListBoxItem>
            <ListBoxItem>Third Item</ListBoxItem>
            <ListBoxItem>Fourth Item</ListBoxItem>
        </ListBox>

    </UniformGrid>

</Window>

EDIT from Answer Author >>>>>>>

Wow! MarqueIV, you are like a flea biting on a dog's tail that just won't let go! So, well done, you've managed to find a situation where this code doesn't work. Rather than simply moving on to find another solution to whatever problem you had like most people would have, you've managed to show that this doesn't work if the ListBox.SelectionMode is set to Muliple.

While I conceed that your first point made is accurate, I'm not sure how this helps the author of this question to whom my answer was aimed at. He made no mention of using multiple selection. My answer was a suitable answer for @jpsstavares's question. I really don't think that you have the right to waste so much of my time because it doesn't answer your particular problem.

Furthermore, I must confess that I never use a ListBox.SelectionMode of Muliple, much prefering the more flexible Extended mode, which does work perfectly with this code. (I even tried it with your code sample and simply changed the mode to Extended... did you even test your own code before going on this rampage?

In fact, ignore that question. Let's just say that you're completely right and great and whatever you want for you to just let this whole ridiculous situation go now. Please stop wasting my valuable time.

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Um, yes this looks strange. From what I can tell, this always sets IsSelected to 'True' so why use triggers at all? Why not just set IsSelected to be true? But of course the question there is why would you even want to do that? In short, what exactly do you think you are you doing here? S.O. is a site where answers are supposed to be explained, not just shown, especially when by your own admission it looks strange. –  MarqueIV Oct 5 '12 at 3:40
    
Well MarqueIV, it's not a big code sample and if you'd have tried it out instead of patronising me, you'd already have worked out why it should be as it is. All the same, here is your explanation: The IsKeyboardFocusWithin property is updated as keyboard focus changes in the application. As the relevant UIElement gains focus, this sets the IsSelected property to true, but if we left it like that, then it would be set back to false as the relevant UIElement lost focus. Therefore the second Trigger is to ensure that it remains selected even if the UIElement is no longer focused. –  Sheridan Oct 5 '12 at 15:55
    
It's not patronizing to ask you to explain your code. The entire point of S.O. is to help developers solve their problems through understanding. So rather than getting unnecessarily offended to a legitimate question, why don't you edit your answer and explain why you did that instead of using an Event trigger on IsKeyboardFocusWithinChanged, which would be much less confusing as by your own explanation, you're reacting to the change, not the value itself, and that's exactly what Event triggers are made for. The way you did it may work, but it isn't clear, and that's why I raised the issue. –  MarqueIV Oct 5 '12 at 17:31
    
Actually, I just tested your code, and as I expected, it doesn't work in the case where your ListBox can multi-select because you've set up triggers that always set 'IsSelected' to true when again, you actually want a trigger on the change. This is at best a 'hack' for single-select lists and you really should put that in your answer as it will just confuse more people. –  MarqueIV Oct 5 '12 at 18:01
    
It works just fine for me in all situations. I'm sorry if you can't get it to work. Maybe you should just stick to your other method instead of continuing to patronise a fellow user... the patronising part was where you try telling me how to behave here despite me being a member for years. Now I've explained why the code sample is as it is. Can we please leave it at that instead of wasting any more space on this post? –  Sheridan Oct 8 '12 at 22:29
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